I am a newbie in a box way world, maybe you guys can help me? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by angelw View Post
    Nothing wrong with my comprehension, however, I'm not familiar with the word "doo".

    A tongue in cheek comment relating back to 2outof3's comment in Post#5, where he asks:
    "Why do you want to build a new box way lathe? What will be special about it?". Accordingly, the only thing special about the Lathe that 2outof3 incorrectly gleaned was being built, is that the OP is calling it a CNC Machine.

    Regards,

    Bill
    My assumption which was not corrected or commented on by the op.

  2. #22
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    Those big old Tree mills used bolted on ground ways which sat on pedestals. I see no reason why you couldn't grind accurate bars, then bolt them on. Then again, why not just buy big honkin' linear rails and be done with it?

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Harrington View Post
    Those big old Tree mills used bolted on ground ways .....
    Mitsui Seiki uses bolted on hardened tool steel ways. It works. There is a bunch of scraping done on the mounting surfaces to achieve the geometry required.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2outof3 View Post
    My assumption which was not corrected or commented on by the op.
    The OP has made one Post only; his opening Post. He hasn't corrected, or commented on anyone's reply.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by angelw View Post
    The OP has made one Post only; his opening Post. He hasn't corrected, or commented on anyone's reply.
    So, I guess we should let this thread die.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2outof3 View Post
    So, I guess we should let this thread die.
    Clearly the OP has no interest, as is often the case. The thread is only continuing via some interest of the Forum; which, to a large degree, is what Forums are about. But I doubt that we will hear, not even a thanks for your advice, from the OP again on this subject.

    Regards,

    Bill

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  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by machtool View Post
    You can not run Turcite against Turcite. You need a differential hardness.

    I fail to see how that solves your problem? You have one long axis, in which you don't have a grinder long enough to make. How does cladding that with Turcite take away the fact it needs to be the datum? Flat / straight etc.
    Thank you for your answer. Okay, I got the point here that the surfaces need to be in different hardness. The main reason why using turcite on both surfaces is because of the lack of grinder machine, which is needed to achieve some kind of mirror finish for one of the surfaces. Besides that, I have an Okuma milling machine which has both of its surfaces (on the x axis) are covered by something (I'm not sure if this is the same type of turcite, or turcite vs other PTFE, gotta check this out). I think flatness/straightness is still can be achieved by hand scraping (?)

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    Quote Originally Posted by cameraman View Post
    @Sofya what size is your intended travel / travels ?


    Don't have a giant gantry style Okuma surface grinder no problem...





    ^^^ (re- introducing) the... Janko- grinder; makes you think though in terms of what can be improved upon if in a real jam and held at gun point.

    Re machtool's point about flatness / datum … Hand scraping seems to have endured for a very long time (I think) simply because large cast iron assemblies can be rendered to extraordinary levels of flatness and straight ness (if you know what you are doing / have experience / skills .) without having to buy a giant multimillion dollar surface grinding machine.


    Depending on length of travels; you may have to get familiar with the correct use of autocollimators for mapping out flatness straightness and parallelism.


    @Sofya a good reference for some of these more traditional techniques IS (still) "Foundations of Mechanical Accuracy" (Wayne R. Moore ). Slight twist on the box way method though … (more reminiscent of surface grinder layout and design).


    Depends on the machine you are building... prepping surfaces for linear rolling element guides is a lot less time consuming and in terms of motion have greater sensitivity / response / lower friction but still need to be pretty damn rigorous geometrically.
    it is 2500mm long. I agree that going with LM Guide is the best way out, gotta go with that if this boxway thingy takes a huge cost, haha.

    And also big thanks for the reference about mechanical accuracy, gotta check that out (thumbs up!!)

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    hm... higher rigidity?

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sofya View Post
    I have an Okuma milling machine which has both of its surfaces (on the x axis) are covered by something (I'm not sure if this is the same type of turcite, or turcite vs other PTFE, gotta check this out).
    I seriously doubt any Okuma ever produced has a plastic on plastic slide way system. I think you might be confusing a wiper plastic or the smear film that's left by a deteriorating wiper. No way known Okuma didn't ever put a plastic / Turcite slide against anything other than a Cast Iron or Induction hardened slide way.

    In my experience of Okuma. The long way / main slide ways will be O.K. Some wear for sure, but the saddle will need relining and scrapping in.

    I've spent many a month in Jakarta. I was there the week you threw out Soharto. We got locked in the hotel for a week, We were the first expats back. I could have run for mayor of Blok M.

    Its only a 7 hour plane trip. I could send you the best hand scraper in the Southern Hemisphere. Failing that I'm come and do it.

    Regards Phil.


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