I don't know what to do with my new CNC machine - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 33 of 33
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Medina OH
    Posts
    1,853
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    157
    Likes (Received)
    809

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scruffy887 View Post
    Persistence is your friend here. Or as my FIL used to say "even a blind pig occasionally finds an acorn". At some point you will find something. While waiting you can look around some scrap yards for cheap metal to practice on. Or engineering plastics to play with. Stuff that can be machined with little or no tool wear.
    I've always used the phrase "beat your head against the desk until something useful comes out" can't remember which teacher told me that

    If the machine is paid for, and you don't need the money, first and foremost HAVE FUN.

    There was a time that I worked full time as a tool & die maker, and had a hobby shop on the side. I only did work I found entertaining, creative, or challenging. Those were the days of running a Hermle at work and coming home to a shop full of 1940's and older manual machines.

    I find I do my best work when I am passionate about what I am making.

    I would tell you to get a seat of Fusion. Even if you pay for it, it's like $500 a year. If you paid outright for a Haas, you can probably scrounge that up.

    Make some gauges, tooling, setup pieces for the shop. This will help you get some processes and programming figured out relative to how the machine runs and cuts.

  2. Likes mTeryk, wheelieking71 liked this post
  3. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Abingdon, VA
    Posts
    3,354
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4487
    Likes (Received)
    3101

    Default I don't know what to do with my new CNC machine

    Get Fusion360 CAD/CAM and learn how to use it, (YouTube is your friend here).

    Go around to all the regional factories, hand out business cards and discuss your abilities. Emphasize low overhead and quick turnaround.

    If you can’t get in the front door to speak to someone, go in through shipping/receiving. People there are friendly, and will direct you to who you need to speak with about work.

    Persistence is key.

    And don’t overpromise! Be honest about prices, capabilities, and deliveries.

    Don’t let the purchasing agents beat you down on every quote...hold your price when you can.

    Good luck!

  4. #23
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    362
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    98
    Likes (Received)
    128

    Default

    Lots of good advice in this thread, might I add, don't try to compete in the race to the bottom. Be competitive but don't be the guy that drives prices so low it can't be done without cutting corners.

    If you are confident in your pricing and a customer tells you someone else can do it much cheaper......tell them to politely take the work there. They usually won't and if they do they will likely be back when cheapy Charlie screws everything up.

  5. Likes as9100d liked this post
  6. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,193
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3307
    Likes (Received)
    1726

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mtndew View Post
    Let me get this straight.... You buy a machine BEFORE you have an order for parts?

    Isn't that putting the cart before the horse?
    I had this discussion with a fellow tool and diemaker about 10 years ago. I was buying some manual machines and he told me that I was supposed to find the jobs first then buy machines to do it on. I told him that I didn't care if I found work for them or not as the machines were more for a hobby shop than anything else.

    Next thing I know I have a buddy that restores old tractors bringing me parts to repair. Then some Harley guys bring me motorcycle parts to work on. Then a tool and die shop finds out that I have machines and can help them out in a jam. It didn't take long and I had more work than I wanted. Be careful what you wish for. There's more to life than making lots of money.

  7. Likes Cole2534 liked this post
  8. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Mebane North Carolina USA
    Posts
    6,659
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    53
    Likes (Received)
    1910

    Default

    This question comes up every 2-3 weeks

  9. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    97
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    I really don't know how people get a bunch of orders before even having a machine without some really good connections. If a shop told me they don't have a machine yet I wouldn't take them seriously unless I knew them personally.

  10. Likes Fal Grunt, Bobw, wheelieking71, Ray-BGKY liked this post
  11. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    846
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    597
    Likes (Received)
    319

    Default

    There is a trade show called “Design2Part” (every month somewhere different in the states I think?) where there are 1,000 little booths with people offering different mfg services. I imagine it’s at least a couple thou to exhibit but could certainly hand out a lot of business cards. Or other trade shows...

  12. Likes Ray-BGKY liked this post
  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    5,870
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7395
    Likes (Received)
    7462

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lazyman View Post
    I really don't know how people get a bunch of orders before even having a machine without some really good connections. If a shop told me they don't have a machine yet I wouldn't take them seriously unless I knew them personally.
    Yea, Agreed. I had all those contacts. But, out of integrity and respect, I ignored them because I did not want to step on toes.
    When enough time had passed that I felt it was okay (and had the blessing of the respected toes), the contacts were all dried up.
    I am still chasing them around trying to figure out who is where?

  14. Likes Ray-BGKY liked this post
  15. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    97
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    26

    Default

    I personally bought my VF-2SSYT without any kind of major work lined up. I had been doing some small jobs here and there with a DIY machine and a Tormach. I actually bought it to manufacture a product with the idea that I could get some small jobs here and there to support the payments but I knew if I had no work for it I could afford to make payments no matter what since I put it in my garage. The way I see it, people are buying decked out trucks for over 50k or boats that don't make you any money. Buying a VMC was like my version of buying a Porche or something. Next thing I know, I'm getting flooded with all the work I could handle and to this day have yet to do what I intended to do with the machine in the first place.

    To the OP, all my connections engineers working at companies who want their parts done fast. Once you save their asses they will keep sending work to you.

  16. Likes Ray-BGKY, rcoope liked this post
  17. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,020
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    210
    Likes (Received)
    619

    Default

    Exactly where is local?
    Don


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  18. #31
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Ridgefield, Wa USA
    Posts
    583
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    193
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    I have a product line I will sell you so I can retire. I machine marine parts from aluminum.

  19. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    20
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    I am in Bowling Green Kentucky

  20. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    S.E. WI
    Posts
    110
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    47

    Default

    As an engineer by trade also, you have to have built up a network over the years? Get out there and start talking to your industry network and start with some intros. As we speak I've got 4 active projects in front of me from doing just that and like one of the responses these are all more parts/industries that have a little more meaning to them for myself than just cutting parts. There is a metric sheet ton of work out there just gotta figure out what sliver of that pie you want to go after.

    What I like about the shop life is how you picture things and what you think your shop is going to be doing could vary well be night n day once you dive in head first and get pulled in various directions when opportunities come a knockin.

    Its an interesting roller coaster ride for sure....

  21. Likes Ray-BGKY liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •