I killed my spindle... - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIM View Post
    ...... stud is from 2013. I have many older.
    I may be running on borrowed time.... None of my pullstuds are newer that 1998. Most are 1995.

  2. Likes dstryr liked this post
  3. #62
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    Sent it off to C&M in Portland Monday evening, talked to them today (Thursday) and they said they were skeptical but ended up grinding it anyways. Sounds like it actually turned out really good, so hats off to those guys! Anyone in greater PNW area who (unfortunately) needs these services should talk to them.

  4. #63
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    I really killed my spindle today. Wrong tool in pocket. Full rapid down into part and spinning at 10k. Spindle sounds bad now. the parallel was under the part.

    s1520003.jpg

  5. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by CosmosK View Post
    I really killed my spindle today. Wrong tool in pocket. Full rapid down into part and spinning at 10k. Spindle sounds bad now. the parallel was under the part.
    Is your spindle belt drive?
    If so - my bet is that the belt took the hit and it is loud now - trying to get the belt and the sprockets to "know each other" again.


    --------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  6. #65
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    No belt. tech came over and said spindle and coupling should be replaced. Fun times.

  7. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by riabma77 View Post
    In this case it's indifferent. I think it would happened the same thing with any other brand / manufacturer.

    Manufacture - who makes the pin can make a huge difference really. I really buy in to maintenance scheduling of everything especially something so enexpensive to replace. It seems whatever you do with a 3/4 inch endmill in aluminum does not seem to me to have caused as much tension to break that pin. It could be basically wear of the female type clamps for that pin maybe lowering the whole tool and then with the rpm and feed rate plus likely a 2 flute endmill you are deceived if things / the machine clamping mechanism provided you have the correct clamping pressure that such failure could occur. For that pin to snap it would have had to loosen and drop a bit could cause such a break.


    I have noticed over the years that with these pins they must be replaced after a certain amount of use always. I have found tools where someone has not even tightened the stud back right usually when they must remove the pin to remove a part of a broken endmill in a already crashed solid tool holder. When a holder is crashed of that size to do things right you must check everything out like runout and obviously look at the taper on the toolholder to see if any chips may have gotten jammed up in the spindle. Check that and feel for any nicks in the taper with your fingers or look under with a flashlight usually the taper on your tool will tell you if a chip got between the taper of the tool and the taper of the spindle. You did not mention if this happened the first time you ran that tool or if it the pin broke on say part number 50. Info like that is important if you want good input you must give good input.


    Also if you were maxing out the feeds and speeds as many new people do because they think a machine can take it is just plain dangerous. Those kind of persons have not had nor seen any physical damage to your hands or hopefully only the machine. If you do not automatically know now after this happened how dangerous such a crash (the holder pin breaking while taking very aggressive cut!) then I hit my fist on the table and say to you the best thing you learn from this number 1 is you are lucky you or someone else was not injured or killed. Yes I said killed. On jobs of especially Aluminum where you can take aggressive cuts the chips generated bounce everywhere to the exten sometimes people will slow the federate down between tool changes to feed hold it before clamping a tool because chips have bounced on the tool from operations. Yep that happens a lot.

    I bet though it was some problem or failure in the clamping mechanism in the spindle I would bet good money on that. Good luck tell us what you learn as you will figure it out soon once you start looking at things. When you do find out let everybody know so they do not waste time trying to help you because one guy gave you the right answer or the machine repairman tells you what really failed.

    there were several posts asking you for more information or giving good feedback to you and you never responded for several posts! You have to give accurate and adequate information to even hope to get the right answer. You asked so you owe everyone a good report and feedback from your asking for advice. Work with us better. Imho

  8. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinit View Post
    Manufacture - who makes the pin can make a huge difference really. I really buy in to maintenance scheduling of everything especially something so enexpensive to replace. It seems whatever you do with a 3/4 inch endmill in aluminum does not seem to me to have caused as much tension to break that pin. It could be basically wear of the female type clamps for that pin maybe lowering the whole tool and then with the rpm and feed rate plus likely a 2 flute endmill you are deceived if things / the machine clamping mechanism provided you have the correct clamping pressure that such failure could occur. For that pin to snap it would have had to loosen and drop a bit could cause such a break.


    I have noticed over the years that with these pins they must be replaced after a certain amount of use always. I have found tools where someone has not even tightened the stud back right usually when they must remove the pin to remove a part of a broken endmill in a already crashed solid tool holder. When a holder is crashed of that size to do things right you must check everything out like runout and obviously look at the taper on the toolholder to see if any chips may have gotten jammed up in the spindle. Check that and feel for any nicks in the taper with your fingers or look under with a flashlight usually the taper on your tool will tell you if a chip got between the taper of the tool and the taper of the spindle. You did not mention if this happened the first time you ran that tool or if it the pin broke on say part number 50. Info like that is important if you want good input you must give good input.


    Also if you were maxing out the feeds and speeds as many new people do because they think a machine can take it is just plain dangerous. Those kind of persons have not had nor seen any physical damage to your hands or hopefully only the machine. If you do not automatically know now after this happened how dangerous such a crash (the holder pin breaking while taking very aggressive cut!) then I hit my fist on the table and say to you the best thing you learn from this number 1 is you are lucky you or someone else was not injured or killed. Yes I said killed. On jobs of especially Aluminum where you can take aggressive cuts the chips generated bounce everywhere to the exten sometimes people will slow the federate down between tool changes to feed hold it before clamping a tool because chips have bounced on the tool from operations. Yep that happens a lot.

    I bet though it was some problem or failure in the clamping mechanism in the spindle I would bet good money on that. Good luck tell us what you learn as you will figure it out soon once you start looking at things. When you do find out let everybody know so they do not waste time trying to help you because one guy gave you the right answer or the machine repairman tells you what really failed.

    there were several posts asking you for more information or giving good feedback to you and you never responded for several posts! You have to give accurate and adequate information to even hope to get the right answer. You asked so you owe everyone a good report and feedback from your asking for advice. Work with us better. Imho
    The OP killed his spindle, I think you just killed a bottle of Jack.


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