Index position on cnc lathe - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spruewell View Post
    Depends on the machine and it’s control. Some older machines require each tool to be indexed at the home position. Others do not. What are you running?
    Exactly, depends on machine.

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    I'm trying to get my head around all this lathe stuff. My question is, what happens if the machine dose not have a home position?

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    I think they do have a home position really I have not seen one that did not. With the indexing positions choked up closer to the chuck it is a matter of if it is worth it. One can set the program up that way and clear all tools for sure yet if the program is saved that way then the next guy setting it up may not know what is going on and leave a established boring bar or something in which might hit.

    Lathe crashes are too loud so it can matter and if your change is saved that way and someone else screws up then you could be on the hot seat. Especially is very little time is saved in the tool change position. I have found the aggressive need for speed in this case is minimal benefit.

    Never do something like this if you feel pressured to do so. If the boss wants it then do it but be careful because it is you standing at that machine.

    The speed of the tool turrent speed is best designed into the machine. Of course that is flexible depending on needs as it may be the case that this helps a lot. In most shops it is not that common to see this done.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinit View Post
    I think they do have a home position really I have not seen one that did not.
    I know mine doesn't have a home position as such, that's what is doing my head in. I checked with were I bought it and they told me it's classed as a floating home/zero and it's similar to the early Fanuc controlled lathes apart from that they were no help. But I got it cheap so I didn't expect any help from them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rick-b View Post
    I know mine doesn't have a home position as such, that's what is doing my head in. I checked with were I bought it and they told me it's classed as a floating home/zero and it's similar to the early Fanuc controlled lathes apart from that they were no help. But I got it cheap so I didn't expect any help from them.
    It just means you will travel past the home position in Manual mode. So, if you use MDI G28 U0W0, you will not over travel.

    R

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    I don't know that rick-b has posted what control his "no-home" lathe has. It is true that early to mid 70s Fanuc controls did not have a reference return function. No G28 ability. I only ran Mori Seiki machines back then and they used a dial indicator on the X axis to set zero. Z zero was wherever you wanted to set it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spruewell View Post
    My old Nakamura however, did require you to return the turret to the home position to index tools and cal offsets.
    Our Nakamura TW-20 at work doesn't require homing to change tools. I don't think I've ever done it that way to be honest. I've always just picked a safe spot away from the part.

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    Whether or not a machine needs to be at machine zero to index the turret is entirely determined by the machine builder. It would be easy for a builder to include a PMC parameter (Keep Relay in Fanuc speak)in their ladder program that could switch the requirement on or off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    I don't know that rick-b has posted what control his "no-home" lathe has. It is true that early to mid 70s Fanuc controls did not have a reference return function. No G28 ability. I only ran Mori Seiki machines back then and they used a dial indicator on the X axis to set zero. Z zero was wherever you wanted to set it.
    No machine home at all ? So every time you turn it on you have to find the X zero location ?

    Wow

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    No machine home at all ? So every time you turn it on you have to find the X zero location ?

    Wow
    Yeah, things were pretty primitive back then.

    The indicator set the X home. You dialed the X down until the indicator zero'd out. At that position your ID holders or the tip of a 6" long turning tool were at spindle centerline. Then you'd press the reset button on the axis display to zero it. It actually worked well and was easy to use.

    Z was usually set by some reference to the chuck face. I used to use the 3" side of a 123 block against the chuck face and touch tool 1 to the block. Zero the axis display and dial back however far I wanted Z zero to be and then reset the display again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    Yeah, things were pretty primitive back then.

    The indicator set the X home. You dialed the X down until the indicator zero'd out. At that position your ID holders or the tip of a 6" long turning tool were at spindle centerline. Then you'd press the reset button on the axis display to zero it. It actually worked well and was easy to use.
    Everything you say reinforces my opinion of JapLand

    1972 Hustler and Uniturns had limit switches and scales. Hit the ref button, the slide would travel until it hit the limit switch (there were three in a row, in case) then travel to the nearest resolver null. Repeated well and was easy to use. Fine adjustment with the differential resolver, easy-peasy.

    So what is your x axis indicator referenced to ? Does the machine come with a setting gage like on a Gleason where one gage face is at the known centerline of the machine ? An indicator has to be set to something.

    On Z I'd always use the locating face of the soft jaws or whatever fixture I was using for 0. But I could program Z in positive numbers, too. Kinda like the part print

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    Ya use G54 only have to back up enough to clear

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    I don't know that rick-b has posted what control his "no-home" lathe has. It is true that early to mid 70s Fanuc controls did not have a reference return function. No G28 ability. I only ran Mori Seiki machines back then and they used a dial indicator on the X axis to set zero. Z zero was wherever you wanted to set it.

    Vancbiker Yes its a "no-name lathe and controller" but it's not that old it's a 2008 Neutron CJK0640 with a WA-31DT controller. I was told that Neutron was owned by Brother back then, well so I'm told. The lathe was new in it's original wrapper when I bought it had been lost in storage from 2008 (funny story)

    It has no G28 and yes it looks like you can set X,Z zero any were you like. At this stage I'm going to try some of the suggestions put up (plus some extra room for safety) and see what happens.

    image1.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Everything you say reinforces my opinion of JapLand

    1972 Hustler and Uniturns had limit switches and scales. Hit the ref button, the slide would travel until it hit the limit switch (there were three in a row, in case) then travel to the nearest resolver null. Repeated well and was easy to use. Fine adjustment with the differential resolver, easy-peasy.
    The use of the resolver allowed this. Of course it also meant there was a tach generator and failure of either meant a run-away axis. I've seen a few of those happen and never want to again. By the late 70s the Fanuc encoders had a one-rev pulse and machine homing to the pulse was available and since it had encoders, run-aways were nearly impossible to occur.

    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    So what is your x axis indicator referenced to ? Does the machine come with a setting gage like on a Gleason where one gage face is at the known centerline of the machine ? An indicator has to be set to something.
    Indicator was referenced to an ID toolholder. Dial it in to the spindle and set zero on the indicator. Only needed if someone messed up the indicator.


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