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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    Cool Light bulb moment

    That moment when something you've been wondering how to do comes off.
    I use Fanuc and Heidenhain and have posted a few times on here for information on macros for Fanuc based controls.
    At the moment I spend most of my time on a heidenhain and have taught myself fk programming (I don't use or understand offline programming).

    But the big breakthrough for me was on Saturday. Doing a simple job, 4 holes on a 37mm pcd. Drawn at 45 degrees so I will put them in at 45 degrees.
    At first I put a rotation in the program and the job was up and running. But I've wondered for years about trig functions on Heidenhain and never understood it. I've looked on here but no luck. There is one video on youtube but it's in German. No problem I'll just turn auto translation on. Except every time he says Q "cow" appears on the screen. Mmmmmm maybe not so simple to work out what this guys saying. But on Saturday with the machine running I had another go. I've not copied the program but the only bit that matter's is below.

    FN6: Q1 = SIN 45
    FN3: Q2 = Q1 * 18.5
    L X-Q2 Y-Q2
    L Y Q2
    Etc.

    Completely unnecessary I know but the sense of satisfaction was enormous.. On a day when England won A cup game I was far more pleased with my simple but still (in my mind) brilliant bit of machining.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    I am by no means proficient at Heidenhain programming. Fortunately the guy who programmed our Hermles prior to me was / is and he is very helpful. If you have a probe with your machine you can probe your part.....then use the values that the machine / probe enters into the machine reserved Q parameters......and calculate and set rotational values using the trig functions. Very cool.....but as I said....the guy before me made all that work and I mostly copy and paste it and modify it for whatever I currently need it for.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Vershire, Vermont
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    Satisfying, isn't it?

    Ellipses with Q programming are a lot of fun, too.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Being a strictly manual machinist I have "zero" experience with any kind of CNC programming. However, back in the 60s
    while I was attending technical school I studied computer programming and one of the programs that we worked with was
    Fortran. I can still remember struggling with it but I can also remember the immense sense of satisfaction I felt the first time
    I put together a program that actually worked. I think the breakthrough for me came when I realized that in addition to getting
    the details right you had to see the big picture as well. After that running long strings of code that performed some pretty
    complicated calculations became a lot easier.

    Every time I see string of code for machine programming I am reminded of my Fortran programming days--there do seem to be
    similarities between the two...


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