Looking for some direction/ advice... - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 28 of 28
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    14,383
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4902
    Likes (Received)
    5202

    Default

    QT: Looking for some direction/ advice.

    Turn left, go three blocks that way and then ask somebody who is wearing a blue hat.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    26
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    25
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CollegeMachinist View Post
    Are you using the built in SolidWorks CAM or HSMWorks?

    It's a tab inside of solidworks that says cam... so to my knowledge its Solidworks CAM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    26
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    25
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    QT: Looking for some direction/ advice.

    Turn left, go three blocks that way and then ask somebody who is wearing a blue hat.
    I am not talking to anyone wearing just a blue hat...

  4. Likes Screwmachine liked this post
  5. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    26
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    25
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SteelrFn View Post
    Your post rubs me the wrong way. When the opportunity door opens you take it. My guess is whenever one opened for you, you slammed it shut and whined and complained.
    This is a great opportunity for this guy IMO, and he deserves it for going above and beyond and was recognized for it.

    To the author of this post, you will always run into people trying to rain on your parade. Ignore them.
    My advice would be to go to night school on your time and your bosses dime and learn the programming language. Your future is bright because you have initiative, take the bull by the horns, sure your time is valuable, so fill it with valuable (FREE) knowledge and you will be on the road to earning more for you and your family.
    Best of luck on whatever you decide.
    Thank you! I presented them with a couple options today and nothing was shot down, but nothing was finalized either. Because, I am currently "making it" they are hesitant to lessen current production, but they understand that it has to happen sometime. Just trying to build up inventory high to compensate for the future drop in production.

    I believe that the route that we are going to take the Haas operator certification online classes $250 each mill and lathe ($500) and then pay $3,500 for their programming training @ a local Haas Training Facility. And find some local Solidworks and Cam courses $1,000-2,500?. All in all around $5-7,000?
    It may not be the best solution, but it seems to be the best compromise/feasible opportunity.

  6. Likes barbter liked this post
  7. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Colorado
    Posts
    601
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    135
    Likes (Received)
    367

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smokeshow View Post
    I don't want to get over loaded with too much, but I am currently making it work, on both pay and workload. Just when it's "programming" heavy, I struggle. And I still haven't even approached the lathe...

    On a pay scale,.. What is a "fair" range to expect? Still hourly, I don't want salary.
    If it was me I would be asking $30-40 MINIMUM. Shop lead (more like shop manager, shop everything!) is a senior role that should be compensated with senior pay. In a perfect world it would be $60 but I live in a fantasy where the US machining trade didn't get gutted.

    As far as training and support, get that assistant like others have mentioned. First of all that is too much work for one guy unless you've got robots doing all your loading. Communicate that that is a non-negotiable and they will hire someone.

    So you are using Solidworks CAM currently? Like the native CAM or some other package? Either way, getting set up for official training is good. When I started my current role, my boss gave me a blank check and 60 hours to get good at mastercam. Obviously it took years to get to the level I am now, but that foundation was critical! So I took some online courses and spent those 60 hours wisely. Now I can program anything basically. I'd recommend something similar if I was in your shoes! Get that sweet training. Maybe take a certification exam?

  8. Likes smokeshow liked this post
  9. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    West Unity, Ohio
    Posts
    27,888
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8205
    Likes (Received)
    9887

    Default

    I would think that someone to show you the finer points of the CAM that you are currently using could help, but I would think that you could get the help that you need here on the CAD/CAM page that would address your needs - when you need them, rather than not remembering - or even not quite understanding the application at the time that it was covered in a class.

    When would you have time for this class?


    I have never taken a machining or CAM class in any way, so I could be off here, but with your current capabilities, I doubt that you are really going to learn much at a skewl class at this point. I would think that you are at least on par, and likely a bit ahead of anyone coming out of a class? Likely you just need to put what you know into practice and learn from there, and ask questions when the needs arise.

    I am a believer in reading the many trade journals that they will send to you free every month. I would think that you would learn about tooling options and such there. Not really techniques, but ...

    For techniques, maybe follwing here, or watching youtube vids in spare time?


    -------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  10. Likes smokeshow liked this post
  11. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,796
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    994
    Likes (Received)
    820

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smokeshow View Post
    I recently was promoted to Cnc Lead.

    So let me help you understand where I am coming from...Cnc Mill and Lathe programmer retired, (early and unannounced)... And the "machinist" quit because he wasn't willing to learn to program.

    My department has 5 axis Cnc Flow Waterjet, 3 axis Cnc Press Brake, 2 axis Cnc Shear, 3 axis Cnc Haas Vertical Mill, and 3 axis Cnc Haas Lathe.

    Up until recently I have programmed/operated the waterjet, brake and shear. I would do light operation and edits in G code on existing programs on the mill (feeds/speeds and tools/height etc...) and basically a button pusher on the lathe.

    So I took it upon myself to try and learn Solidworks, so I could begin doing some programming on the mill. On which I have achieved some success in the 2 weeks since starting. I've made approximately 10-15 working and (currently) running production programs. But, by no means do I feel proficient or efficient at it yet.

    But our company president walked out on the shop floor (and I was like oh, crap... what did I screw up). He proceeded to say, "Thank you for going above and beyond on your own, and I want to give you a blank check for success. Whatever you need as far as training/ schooling and software. You can have it, no matter what. Even if you complete it and leave the company for a better job, I am willing to take that risk."

    So that being said, I am looking for some outside viewpoints and ideas/suggestions/input. I am not a machinist, but apparently I need to "assume" that role somewhat now. I feel like in order to really grasp programming both the lathe and mill, you need to operate them efficiently.


    Possible Ideas...
    Haas Certificate Programs (Any real value?)(Short term solution)
    Community College (mid length investment)
    UTI CNC Machining Program (Orlando)(long term/long investment)

    I am located in the Tampa Bay Area. (Florida)

    Any other information that you need from me, I'll be glad to help.
    Knowledge is power. Get some.
    Community college courses are great for covering a lot of basics.
    The Haas programs are ok, as they can give you some good background on controls.
    The UTI Program may be the most beneficial but takes the most commitment.

    My take is to start with the "easy" way and work up.
    Ask questions. LOTS of questions.
    I used to do Applications and Training for a major MTB, I'm more than willing to share.

  12. Likes smokeshow liked this post
  13. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    8
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    After manual machining for 19 years learning how to use hori/vert mills, lathes, vertical lathes, od and surface grinders, the small company I work for bought a cnc mill. We had a student machinist, from the community collage, working for us at the time. They helped me get the basics of solidworks and cam. This worked for me. Maybe your company could go a similar route, hire a second year student needing some practical experience.

  14. Likes smokeshow liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •