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  1. #21
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    Hows the backlash been? Notice any premature wear?
    Aaah, If she gets a little wear in don't fear. You can finger in some compensation and she'll tighten up like a prom date.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by fmari --MariTool- View Post
    But so far I didn't have to really buy any parts for this machine so maybe my opinion will change.
    So far his process usually goes like this:

    1) Attempt to locate part in manual having trouble because they did not translate the part name correctly

    2)Take pictures of the part in the manual along with full description of part and email it asking for a PO

    3)They can't find the part/ have no idea what he is talking about so he disassembles the assembly to get the part and take pictures of it and where it came from.

    4)Usually by this point it will get escalated to someone higher up who can tell the difference between their ass and a hole in the ground.

    5) 50/50 chance of getting correct part.

    The amount of emails he had to just to get a basket filter for one of the coolant pumps our 960 was amazing.

  4. #23
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    Our Wia lathes have been ok. They both leak like crazy and our maintenance guy swears he'll quit if they buy another Hyundai because of how hard he has to work just to get parts for them. That and day 1 problems with our F960B's tool changer. Reading their manuals can be fun for some bad translations and spelling though.
    Aside from my Cincinnati Hawks my Kia/Wia SKT-21LMS are the best lathes I've ran. Yeah they leak like a worn out prostitute but hold good size and run all day. The manuals? Well, They just take up space. That little cartoon guy on each page with a "?" above his head or scratching his chin pointing at something about sums up the whole set of manuals.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by CAMasochism View Post
    So far his process usually goes like this:

    1) Attempt to locate part in manual having trouble because they did not translate the part name correctly

    2)Take pictures of the part in the manual along with full description of part and email it asking for a PO

    3)They can't find the part/ have no idea what he is talking about so he disassembles the assembly to get the part and take pictures of it and where it came from.

    4)Usually by this point it will get escalated to someone higher up who can tell the difference between their ass and a hole in the ground.

    5) 50/50 chance of getting correct part.

    The amount of emails he had to just to get a basket filter for one of the coolant pumps our 960 was amazing.
    Excuse me for being assumptive. But it sounds like your guy needs to learn more nomenclature for Machine parts. You can't just send a picture of a main bearing out of 351ci. to Autozone and ask for a price...the people on the other end of the line are basically office types. AND that isn't only Hyundai/Wia it's everyone.

    R

  6. #25
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    He knows his stuff. The problem is the manuals for these machines don't even name the parts right. Hell a few times the parts weren't even in the book at all. He knows more than most of the young'uns that the outside techs send out to work on our machines when he's on vacation or too busy working on getting another machine up and working, and the only thing that the experienced guys get over him is their ability to get support for working through the Fanuc control ladders.

    Hell if you have an old Doosan H-100 there's probably no one in NA that knows it better after he had to spend 4 months rebuilding our rotary table which was one hell of a nightmare situation.

  7. #26
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    Got a 4 year old VF-3SS here, run it at 15K as much as I have application for, sometimes two days constant. Ran some production 24/7 for three months with about 50% of that being at 15K. Only problem I had was when I trochoidally slotted along the X axis with only about .010" Y movement, 3/4" long slots, 12 slots indexed around a part, about two dozen parts. That killed the Y axis thrust bearings through fretting corrosion, but it was a fast and relatively cheap repair. I run a spindle warmup every morning if it hasn't been running overnight, and now that I know about fretting corrosion I'll slot a bit, rapid 3" diagonal away and back to redistribute the lube, then continue. No more problems.

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  9. #27
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    You will heat that grease in the bearing in less than a minute and keeping the oil from the soaping agent has everything to do with keeping the bearing rotating.

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  11. #28
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    Warming up a spindle has little to do with the bearings and more to do with what the spindle casing has to do with the bearings. Once you take and reduce the radial load on the bearings by heating the surrounding encasements a little they tend to last longer. Spindles like Haas up to 2020 live longer IMHO with in floor radiant heat.

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    Late to this party but a great quote I heard (altered for this subject)... keeping your CNC machine in good condition so you don't wear it out is like not having sex with your girlfriend so she is more desirable for the next guy".

    Machines depreciate based on age and condition. A 20 year old Haas in mint condition with low hours isn't worth much more than the same machine in age-appropriate condition. No reason not to run it. Take care of it and maintain it, but don't worry too much about longevity. If used right and taken care of, the money you earn from it will more than offset whatever additional value you'll get when selling, or whatever you might spend additional on repairs vs. babying it.

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  14. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by SRT Mike View Post
    Late to this party but a great quote I heard (altered for this subject)... keeping your CNC machine in good condition so you don't wear it out is like not having sex with your girlfriend so she is more desirable for the next guy".

    Machines depreciate based on age and condition. A 20 year old Haas in mint condition with low hours isn't worth much more than the same machine in age-appropriate condition. No reason not to run it. Take care of it and maintain it, but don't worry too much about longevity. If used right and taken care of, the money you earn from it will more than offset whatever additional value you'll get when selling, or whatever you might spend additional on repairs vs. babying it.
    I'm not looking to baby the machine, but the purpose of our in house shop is to be able to modify parts and turn out things overnight to facilitate prototyping. If I beat the shit out of the machine to save a few minutes here and there and have it fail when we need it, it seems to defeat the purpose.

    I'm not sure if I wasn't clear in my initial post, or if the majority of this forum has the production mentality, but we couldn't really care less about resale value or keeping it for 20 years. The goal is to keep the machine running well and focus on preventative maintenance rather than unscheduled maintenance. Obviously it'd be ideal to have more than one machine, however we just don't have the space. Our entire "machine shop" of a manual lathe and mill, along with the two CNC mills is crammed into a few hundred sq ft. We're growing, but can't move to our new space for a few months, so the idea is to not shit on the Haas in order to maintain productivity.

  15. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC3KNM View Post
    .....The goal is to keep the machine running well and focus on preventative maintenance rather than unscheduled maintenance. ......
    That is a huge part of a production mentality.

    IME, it is shops that only use their machine(s) for the occasional prototype build or rework/mod job that do little PM work.

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  17. #32
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    I'm one of those run it in 50% rapid to not wear it out fast guys. In my case, there just really is no sense in running it max speed as the time savings are pretty much worthless in my situation. There are times where I even need more time between cycles so I can work on other stuff and not be interrupted. The machines are designed for max rapids but your axis acceleration forces are going to last longer, and more heat will be generated in the ball screws and linear guides. How much difference it will make its hard to know. If you floor the pedal on a sports car all the time vs smoothly accelerating,its going to break down sooner even though that's what its made to do. If the machining time becomes the bottle neck I use 100% rapids. I always do spindle warm up and check under the way covers every few months to make sure things are getting lubed and clean out some chips.

    If I were in your situation I wouldn't think much about it but, I would just run it slower and if it starts to feel like its slowing you down your entire operation, then speed it up, otherwise there's just no point in running max if you don't need it. Maybe that one day you forget the vise handle or something on the table, not being in 100% rapid maybe will safe your ass.

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  19. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    That is a huge part of a production mentality.

    IME, it is shops that only use their machine(s) for the occasional prototype build or rework/mod job that do little PM work.
    I understand that, but the mentality of run the shit out of it and replace what needs to be when it's worn doesn't jibe with our workload. The only other CNC mill we've got is an old converted Fryer knee mill, so if the Haas goes down we lose a lot of our already meager capabilities. The intent of this thread was to get a decent idea of what to watch for on these machines and some input from people that have much more experience than I do. I've gotten a lot of really good input and I've got a better grasp of what needs attention and what not to worry about.


    I worked field service on EDMs for a bit, seeing what happens when machines aren't taken care of properly definitely helps motivate PM work.


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