Machine Shop Layout
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  1. #1
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    Default Machine Shop Layout

    I am having discussions with upper management about the most efficient way to layout CNC machines. We are moving into a new building and I have submitted my layout but they are wanting it "the other way". I won't say who's is who's so I can get your feedback. Thanks.

    side.jpg #1

    line.jpg #2

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    I’m not overly familiar with your processes or anything, but just looking quick option #1 seems more user friendly. Especially if you have operators running more than 1 machine.

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    I like to draw the work benches, workers and draw in the work flow...and on one sketch draw in Lighting.

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    If there are people always in front of the machines, then #1.

    If the machines run unattended, which it looks like they do since the lathes all have barfeeders, then #2. Load all the bars from the same side, empty all the chips from the same side, top off all coolant tanks from the same side. Much more efficient and much more tidy.

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    Layout 1 allows for teamwork and you can see who is busy and who is not, and operators can learn from one another. Layout 2 isolates everyone and this tends to lead to slowdowns as your mind wanders. Boredom will be a problem.

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    chime me in for 1 !

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    I'm here to make money...lots of it...Having my shop oriented both ways as you have shown...#2 made the most sense for us and lets us make the most money.

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    2 is how I would do it, for the reasons stated above.

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    I don't like either one.

    I want the lathes set on an angle so the operator on the next machine isn't standing inline with the chuck behind him.

    Where applicable, I like to oppose in pairs so one guy can load 2 machines. I want the mill and lathe tooling separated so the lathe tooling is convenient to lathes and the mill tooling is convenient to the mills.

    I want all the chip bins to have an easy path for the forklift to get to them, and I want a clear material flow to and from the machines.

    I layout the material flow first. Incoming to the racks, to the saws, to the machines, to the shipping area. Then place the machines according to the workflow and safety considerations.

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    #2 is a terrible set up if you have an operator running 2+ machines. As an owner/operator I can only speak on what works for my situation. It's nice to have all my machines facing Inward to monitor them. And move around with ease.

    You should explain what kind of work you do.

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    Yes - need more info.
    Are you a prototype shop with 1x man per machine or a bucket shop making high volume open tolerance parts and multi manning?

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    if you search the archives, it's been discussed several times.

    And a few those times, I took the time to explain in great detail how I used to do it for a living.

    FWIW your layout is sorely lacking in details.

    Might as well get out some darts for management to toss at it.

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    #1 seems good

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    Want to think about how your going to load very heavy parts.

    Can you get a forklift, or some other type of lifting device and have sufficient room to get it (the part) into the machine.

    If you don't run heavy parts then i't not an issue.

    I have everything set up as with #1

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    6 operators or barfeeding, #2

    We don't do much barfeeding, and never have 1 operator at every cnc machine, so #1 is the best way to get guys running multiple machines (which can double or triple your production per operator = making money). In some cases for long running parts you can have someone run 2 machines that are 100 ft. apart, but they don't like it. Since you are dealing with humans and not robots, unhappy operators means less production. My guess is that you will be asked to run multiple machines simultaneously, and are pushing management toward #1.

    -Gene

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    It is all about work flow, raw materials in, finished goods out, which layout gives the shortest, smoothest path?

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    Quote Originally Posted by as9100d View Post
    I'm here to make money...lots of it...Having my shop oriented both ways as you have shown...#2 made the most sense for us and lets us make the most money.
    I am curious how you figure setup 2 made you more money?? If the machines are unattended, I would think either way would produce the same results. If they are not unattended, it seems like setup 1 would be more efficient for operators to load and/or monitor 2 or more machines.

    No offense, but have no clue how you could pinpoint that to machine layout... Ya you monitor and check spindle up time, but I can't imagine one way was 80% and the other way was 90% without some other factors involved, but I am all ears.

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    I like the mills fronts facing each other as the materials, tools, jobs and people are all in one area. It makes running several machines easy to monitor.

    The lathes I prefer on staggered on angles as I can fit more machines in that way. All get loaded from same side, easy to monitor all the controls. Face to face on lathes one controls easy to see, the others hidden. Always going back and forth

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    We currently have a layout similar to 1, with lathes in line end to end. Seemed like a reasonable idea at the time for crane access and operator visibility etc.

    It's a really bad setup. Can't run long bars up the spindle because the next machine is in the way, awkward to drive in/out with the chip bin, limited room to remove the conveyor because it slides out the end of the lathe etc.

    Angled would be my preference now for lathes.

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  23. #20
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    Hard to make money with all those issues above... That's why we are setup like #2, I like making money more than things looking "cool"


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