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Thread: Okuma MB4000-H

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by dstryr View Post
    "Everything would be fine"

    What kind of parts are you doing and what are the tolerances?
    If you had a part that was the full length of the y travel and you cut the face with the bottom of a tool at B0. Then rotate to B90 or B270 and put a series of bores in along the Y axis. How different would these holes measure from top to bottom?

    Maybe your parts are small enough the operator just comps this out... or are you using probing?
    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    What kind of moron runs the spindle into a tombstone at wide-open rapids?

    A machine that costs the better part of a half million dollars or more deserves a little more attention and care than that.

    When I read about this kind of shit I wonder how so many machine shops can even exist? And how so many can get so big and make so much money for the owners?? Good salesmen I guess...

    ToolCat
    The previous job, we had (11) Mazak Horizontals making steering knuckles from forged, pre-hardened steel, pretty much 24/7. Keep in mind CNCToolcat, that when you have a two-nest fixture with 30 work offsets, and a 35 minute cycle time, and several different fires to put out at the same time (other problems pulling at your attention,) the chance to fat-finger a work-offset, or TLO is highly probable. Not all of us cutting chips live in the same world...

    Dstryr - I mean we'd clamp the pallet back in the machine, sweep in some critical bores, and they're be bang-on. We'd check the concentricity between two in-line bores - which were drilled/bored/reamed at different X/B positions, and they'd be within the .0015" concentricity tolerance. (On a CMM, and with manual inspection tools, including a "concentricity bar," which is basically a humongous gage-pin...)

    Like I said though. Sometimes the pallet would come off before anything else got damaged. One time in particular, we had to rebuild all of the pallet clamps, and a B-axis worm/drive, and if I'm not mistaken, the cross-roller bearing as well...

  2. #22
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    Never had any real issues with the Matrix. The engineering is sound and not difficult to understand, although it is a little strange how they do the expanding racks: If you order less than the full magazine capacity, they give you the first tool trees, and the LAST tool trees leaving the middle trees out for possible future expansion. This means that you'll have tools 1-75, then skip 76-125, then you'll have 126-240. We can rename the tool in the computer to whatever we want, but the number placards on the tool trees wont match. Not a big downer, just a little weird. Overall, I WAY prefer the Matrix to the chain mainly for the installation and removal of tools. If you manually remove or install a tool with the chain, YOU have to remember where you put it and update the computer. Matrix does that for you!

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    I'm a little surprised you can't set up a Z value that's a "don't rapid from here in" for a tool. Is that possible or just rarely used?
    I am not sure if that is possible or not. That would be a question for an application guy which I am NOT, lol. If it was an option I doubt customers would use it due to increased cycle times. I have watched these machines run and most of them rapid the tombstone right up to the tool. This accident happened because the operator started mid program or something like that.

    I started the job on Monday trying to determine what parts we needed. On Tuesday we found out that half of the parts were only available in Japan. Those parts were Q-24'd on Tuesday and we had to tear the B-axis all the way down and reset the bottom hub that bolts on the B-axis from the bottom to get the B-axis back to factory specs. The parts arrived Thursday morning from Japan and we finished aligning both pallets yesterday afternoon. The customer is running this machine today. The MB4000 full B-axis is by far the best designed B-axis I have worked on and I have rebuilt about all of the B-axis that Okuma offers, one degree to full b-axis. In my opinion these are pretty awesome machines and easy to service.

    Daryl

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unahorn View Post
    Since we are checking out new horizontals for the shop. Anyone have experiences with Okuma MB4000-H? How reliable are they? Is the Matrix tool changer reliable? Have you ran one with a fastems connected?
    We have two MB4000s and they are good solid machines. No complaints and they handle everything we have thrown at them. Only wish there was a higher RPM HSK spindle easily available for them. Plus we get great service from Gosiger and that usually seals the deal with us.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    What kind of moron runs the spindle into a tombstone at wide-open rapids?

    A machine that costs the better part of a half million dollars or more deserves a little more attention and care than that.

    When I read about this kind of shit I wonder how so many machine shops can even exist? And how so many can get so big and make so much money for the owners?? Good salesmen I guess...

    ToolCat
    Many shops prefer 17$/hr guys that don't understand the danger/cost and don't really care. Your paying for what you get.

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowCountryCamo View Post
    Many shops prefer 17$/hr guys that don't understand the danger/cost and don't really care. Your paying for what you get.
    What is a reasonable average wage for a setup man on a horizontal machine? I know it will vary but just curious.


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