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  1. #41
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    oops.jpg


    This happened in our shop about a month ago. No injuries. Ripped his shirt and light jacket right off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gobo View Post
    oops.jpg


    This happened in our shop about a month ago. No injuries. Ripped his shirt and light jacket right off.
    Glad he's not hurt, other than his Ego.

    But I'll bet money he becomes the most conscientious person in the shop.

    R

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    Quote Originally Posted by litlerob1 View Post
    Glad he's not hurt, other than his Ego.

    But I'll bet money he becomes the most conscientious person in the shop.

    R
    After realizing just how close to the next world he had come, he literally went into mild shock. Scared shit out of everyone.

  4. #44
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    Shit !!
    How did that happen?

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    Quote Originally Posted by g-coder05 View Post
    I for one tend to lean more toward having safety keys, but with good reason. I typically run extremely large machines and that generally means walking out on a VTL chuck or Inside a big bridge mill so keys are a bit more important.

    My very last contract before I left the states was at a place called Doncasters in San Diego. Doncasters is a big supplier of Solar/Caterpillar for big parts. I was only going to be there a few weeks working on some fixtures and maybe modifying some programs. Well I should have walked right out the door. They put me on a antique retrofitted VTL with a 120" chuck. I didn't like the machine from the minute I saw it and kind of figured why nobody wanted to run it. But, Hey, They flew me out there and I had a job to do.

    I had been out in the shop dicking around with how to hold some big ass forgings and was sitting on the chuck. I had written the program to run the side rail to come in and cut the O.D. while the cross rail came in for the bore.Everything was touched off and I had dry ran it once so it was still in run mode. the Machine had some cheesy home made sheet metal swing out doors that you could lock with a screen door latch and the control was bolted to the floor with a piece of pipe just dropped in so you could swivel it. As i'm sitting there sketching out shit in my head I notice the osculating fan blow the door open into the control. As fate would have it the handle hit cycle start and my merry-go-round adventure begins. Granted the 20k pound chuck takes a while to get to 10 rpm's but the rapid motion of 4 different axis coming from all different directions makes you move quickly. The only way out was the open front door but as I made my leap to safety the 1-1/2 drive ratchet to clamp the parts was still in the chuck and had different plans for me. It snagged me right in the gut and drug me around the chip pan for two full revolutions before someone hit the E-stop.

    Apparently when they looked at the CCTV I had gotten my bell rung by the XZ side rail on the first pass and the door busted my legs on the second pass. When it was all said and done I woke up in the hospital with a broken femur, all four Meniscus were torn, My eye socket was broke in 18 places (had to be that dam side rail, pretty sure that bastard didn't give), a broken nose, and a mild concussion.

    For over a year the attorneys fought over who was at fault. Mine, For leaving the switch in run mode? Or Doncasters for not having a door safety interlock?
    In the end it was the maintenance guy who took the interlocks off of all the machines that told OSHA he had been instructed to remove the locks on the machine and the door hitting cycle start was actually common and operators were told to turn the controller before getting in the machine.

    So yeah, keys and safeties are annoying sometimes I admit. But one mishap and you may wish it had been there.
    I'm not sure what the prize is, but you win it!
    Glad you're okay;.

  6. #46
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    This happened in our shop about a month ago. No injuries. Ripped his shirt and light jacket right off.[/QUOTE]

    Working in a cold shop sucks, but man , you just can’t have loose clothes near rotating equipment.

    I have a drill bit with some copper strapping wrapped around it. It’s been by my drill press for years, I was drilling it free hand and the copper and my hand got pulled into the chuck, luckily it was my cheapo small drill and I was actually able to stall the motor as I reached for the switch. I keep it there as a reminder not to be stupid(again)

    Glad your guy is not hurt!



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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  8. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gobo View Post
    oops.jpg


    This happened in our shop about a month ago. No injuries. Ripped his shirt and light jacket right off.
    Boys Gone Wild: Machine Shop Edition

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  10. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by fmari --MariTool- View Post
    Shit !!
    How did that happen?
    The operator had decades of experience. That shows that experience does not accident proof you. And the post incident drug test was clean. No pot head required. He made the mistake of taking a shortcut. The spindle was left turning and he leaned in to take a measurement. The 1.5 end mill grabbed his light coat and proceeded to pull him in backwards. He fought his way out. Ended up with some technicolor bruises.

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  12. #49
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    That's precisely why when I first started I vowed to never reach past a rotating part or tool. I was told a story about a operator that reached over a spinning 4" horizontal bar and a guy down the shop floor just heard a THUMP,THUMP,THUMP looked around and just saw red and the guy laying next to the machine with his arm spinning attached to the spindle thumping against the z waycover. He was not alive, neck was snapped before arm ripped off.

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    Ive been in this industry a bit of awhile. Not as long as many of you. The second shop I programmed in had a guy with one arm who was the lead of the gear hobbing machines. Everyone joked that he got it caught in a cotton-gin as a kid because he was so old, but the reality is that he got sucked into a lathe.

    Some of the oil and gas parts we ran were downright terrifying. Ive thrown 100lb parts out of a 2 vise setup before that nailed the enclosure.

    Currently my most feared equipment is my engine lathe and my CNC lathe. I love milling but lathes scare the shit out of me. Especially when they have a 20+hp spindle. Im lucky to have all my digits and appendages, but only because I fear my machines like any sane person should. Machines don't care about your flesh. No jewelry, no long sleeves, if it CAN get caught in a machine, eventually it WILL get caught in a machine.

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  15. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidScott View Post
    Bong full??? How about their next cigarette or that warm can of beer in their car? That's been my experience, and I have worked with a lot of tokers.
    Just as bad.

  16. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmadness View Post

    Some of the oil and gas parts we ran were downright terrifying. Ive thrown 100lb parts out of a 2 vise setup before that nailed the enclosure.

    Currently my most feared equipment is my engine lathe and my CNC lathe. I love milling but lathes scare the shit out of me. Especially when they have a 20+hp spindle.

    When I was with Doosan we had a lathe with a 200hp spindle that basically was a Puma on steroids. Chuck was 8 feet. Boring bars were 6", turret was 10 ft, tailstock quill was 24" in diam. Scared the hell out of me. That thing actually had a 500 RPM readline that looked like it was going 6k. Ugh..

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  18. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    It's a good question. I work on a lot of older machines that have been monkeyed with so much it's hard to say what safety equipment was supposed to be there in the first place.

    I guess to me it requires a judgement call.

    An older, slower, machine parked in the tool room and occasionally run by a few highly skilled guys: you could probably take off all the guards and never have an issue.

    A lightning fast production machine being run by a high school kid over summer break: a two foot thick concrete wall around the machine might not keep him safe.


    On that note, I was driving last week and stopped for a drink. A Ford diesel truck died at the traffic light in front of where I was parked. He could not get it started. I had some tools with me and I was prepared to give the guy a hand. Then I looked at the load on his trailer.

    Attachment 258586

    That's probably a 10,000 lb machines and not a chain or strap in site. He can call a tow truck.
    Yes, a 10k machine, and since that is a SRW Ford, either a 350 or heaven forbid a 250.

    Wow, Wow WOW.

    I hauled a skid in a dump trailer for a guy once. I called him and asked him how to chain it down. He said, no worries, it can’t go anywhere. When I got to where I was dropping it, it was on a steep hill and the skid was standing up on its back tires, resting against the front of the dump trailer. I nearly wet myself. He just laughed when I told him about it. Happens all the time he said.


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