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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudy_33 View Post
    I get what he's saying. I've seen this structure at a few places. A local place doesn't pay that well but has VERY handsome retirement benefits. It makes sense if you're a 'lifer' at the shop. Not so much if you'll only be there for a few years then move to another town.

    These are pretty standard things to look for in any job. Gotta weight your options.
    Nothing wrong with weighing your options, and that wasn't what I was saying. You are new here, if you stick around you'll see tom post the same shit over and over about working overtime and 401k and 20 ton castings being .0000001" out of flat over 10000"

    According to Tom's math, I could potentially make approx 6k more a year @25/hr (than I make now on 40 hours mind you) by working 50 hours a week, every week without ever missing a day... and don't take vacation because you'll miss out on that 10 hours of overtime that week!!

    I'll pass on that deal thank you.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    Nothing wrong with weighing your options, and that wasn't what I was saying. You are new here, if you stick around you'll see tom post the same shit over and over about working overtime and 401k and 20 ton castings being .0000001" out of flat over 10000"

    According to Tom's math, I could potentially make approx 6k more a year @25/hr (than I make now on 40 hours mind you) by working 50 hours a week, every week without ever missing a day... and don't take vacation because you'll miss out on that 10 hours of overtime that week!!

    I'll pass on that deal thank you.
    You're just taking all the fun out of being a wage slave.

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  5. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rudy_33 View Post
    Hi all,

    I'll be starting a 9 month machining program at the end of August. The course is taught by a friend and has a significant emphasis on CNC programming. We also get NIMS certified to graduate.

    I'm wondering what you folks think of this and what advice you would give. What certifications or training should I pursue after graduation?

    I'm a young (mid-twenties), fairly capable guy, with a varied work history - everything from laying carpet, to backpack guiding, to finance (my current occupation).
    Perhaps it's the nerves of making a big life change. I'm concerned about finding a job here in South Dakota where me and the lady can support a family.

    TITANS of CNC: Academy | BUILDING BLOCKS AEROSPACE

    Titans of CNC building blocks for Aerospace.

    ^^^ Not to open too much of a can of worms, but to make an omelet … (some eggs will be violated.).

    I'm originally from the U.K. so my grasp of US based geography is still limited. But reading this thread and your comments (@Rudy_33) seems there are some opportunities in Aerospace in North Dakota (like Fargo) and elsewhere / "East River" near your family (requirement) and "More flexibility " after your wife graduates from Sioux falls etc. 100 mile radius of North Dakota , South Dakota and Minnesota.

    "Peeps" here on PM forum are probabaly more familiar with some of the bigger shops in your area (200 mile radius of where you need to be).

    Also coming from the U.K. I'm not that familiar with the NIMS certificate , I get the "Vibe" that it's a bit theoretical vs. making a ton of relevant contemporary parts using vaguely contemporary manufacturing techniques ?

    As an employer generally I look for what someone can actually do and what potential they have (rather than a more theoretical certificate perhaps)... Is this someone that IS worth investing in with proven talent for the job or particular role within a company .


    With the Titans of CNC building blocks at least (theoretically) I can see whether someone has an aptitude for the type of work required. We don't build airframes or propulsion systems but over the years / decades I have pinched many many techniques and design approaches from aerospace. So the "Aerospace" referenced precision surfaces in complex geometries IS relevant to a lot of modern work. Tool and Die being a separate discipline but ALSO relevant.

    HOWEVER ~ Just to put the cat amongst the pigeons I am a little Leary of folks that are "Spoon fed" "Answers" in whatever form; so just because someone was able to crank out the BB-Aerospace sample parts would be GOOD to demonstrate that the candidate "Gets it" by devising alternate or similar or more challenging parts "Off course" to demonstrate that they were able to challenge themselves with a test part(s) that solved a particular challenge. That might make for a better 'Portfolio" perhaps.

    It's more about aptitudes and what employers want to invest in as you say @Rudy_33 a lot of folks will be retiring from this industry and AEROSPACE will be a three trillion dollar industry (at least according to Titan, seems accurate) and best not to let that opportunity slip through our hands (collectively within the USA.).


    The academy's goal is to provide some kind of online certification for completing certain course components like the BB aerospace but provide some sort of recognized "Certificate" / recognized standard. [That's what they are pushing and in partnership with big aerospace companies .]. (No doubt rocks will be thrown at that, but I say , bring it on … See what happens/ stress test the concept.).

    @Rudy_33 what would your friend that teaches the course what would he or she make of Academy aerospace and other components ?

    Is that something that should be encouraged / incorporated or just kind of ignored ? (Just curious on your take / view point, not that you could vouch for your friend's view point per se ?).




    Obligatory ^^^^ youtube video Titan talking about certifications + aerospace companies .

    They are also rolling out a newer fixturing course that (personally) I think is equally valuable if not more (but given the hierarchical nature of larger shop floors I'm sure 'peeps" will throw rocks at that too.).


    ________________________________________________

    I'd be interested in how much your wife's degree is costing (student loans) versus Titan's concept of not going to college and instead buying a machine(s) that you can put in your garage … (Kind of thing) or get a shop involved with the Academy so you can get experience making your parts (another Titans* concept).

    ________________________________________________

    * No affiliation, but always concerned about the future of manufacturing (especially with what the USA can be best at and not hemorrhage such opportunities overseas .).

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  7. #24
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    I can say I don't know anything about the NIMS cert and what it does or doesn't do/help with. I have seen ads here and there saying something like "nims certification preferred and/or required".

    I will say 9 months is a short time to 'learn' machining, unless it is like a full day of classes, every day, 5 days a week. Even then, if you are a good student, you will see you are just at the tip of the iceburg so to speak. I have been in this trade since I was 19 and I still learn things, either through being exposed to new parts/ideas/machines, or reading here about how people do things differently at their shop/job.

  8. #25
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    Adding to what cameraman said on 08-03, go to YouTube and start watching Titans of CNC: Academy. For free.
    I can't find it at the moment, but there is a 10-step series to programming a CNC machine to do basic work thru more advanced designs.
    As far as getting hired, after school, start here: YouTube
    Keep a good attitude, be on time, don't buy cheap tools (you'll be sorry and you'll be buying better tools next time, which will be soon), and pack your lunch.


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