Roll-In milling technique ? (video)
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  1. #1
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    Default Roll-In milling technique ? (video)

    Maybe this has been discussed here already and I missed it, but I honestly hadn't given so called "roll-in" technique much thought before. Here's a (Sandvik) video to show what I mean -

    www.myyellowcoat.com/machine-type/3-and-4-axis-machine/roll-in-milling/

    Thoughts ? (or links to past discussions of such here ?)

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    I haven't seen it here. I've done it, and it works, didn't realize it had a name.

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    Interesting, and certainly been experienced.
    From the looks of it, the "roll-in" radius is equivalent to the cutter diameter?

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    This is part of the reason Deckel has (has had since the '80s) the Radial Approach and Departure with Comp, this also helps with tool marks at the start and finish points.

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    Nice find! Some of the other vids look good too. Here is to hoping they keep expanding the collection.
    I can see using that technique in the future.

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    Interesting!

    Thank you Milacron.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SeymourDumore View Post
    Interesting, and certainly been experienced.
    From the looks of it, the "roll-in" radius is equivalent to the cutter diameter?
    I definitely want to try this, my not so rigid machine complains a lot on cut entry, especially on steel. I believe the roll-in radius has to be the same as the tool radius.

    On a starting cut away from you as you face the workpiece (like the video) it appears that you offset the tool by one radius to the right, approach the workpiece then just when it touches you make a clockwise quarter arc starting in the 9 o'clock direction with the radius the same as the tool radius. So the tool essentially pivots around that first touch point, keeping the chips always thin on exit but increasing thicker on entry until the tool fully enters the cut.

    I've got some steel parts I need to cut a slot in the next week or two, it would be easy to program this change in, I'm definitely going to give it a shot, it makes sense, I'll report back how it goes.

    Paul T.

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    Many CAM systems I have seen, including the one I use, have many entry options - including "roll in" like options.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    I haven't seen it here. I've done it, and it works, didn't realize it had a name.

    Same here. I don't have much of a problem with needing it when face milling, mostly when using end mills.

    Jeff

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    Seems like it would be good to add a wee bit to your rad, or know EXACTLY where the edge of your part is.


    -------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    I add about .015 -.050, less on smaller cutters, more on larger ones for safety.

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    I've found this is the only way to get any sort of life out of solid carbide em's, especially when cutting stainless. I would have thought a radius entry/exit was standard on most any cam system?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Cross View Post
    I've found this is the only way to get any sort of life out of solid carbide em's, especially when cutting stainless. I would have thought a radius entry/exit was standard on most any cam system?
    While my CAM system does permit many entry styles, I'm still the one who gets to choose the direction I admit I've not thought of it before, and it will be easy enough to change my habit. For straight profiles, I have up til now, simply fed straight in parallel to the profile, never thought to sneak around the corner on the stock side of the profile.

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    Cool video!

    Thanks,

    BW

    CNC Cookbook: Blog

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    Couldn't see the video due to our network crap, but that is the ONLY way I chose to attack parts.

    I use that technique on endmills, but never really tried it with a facemill.

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    I've always done that tbh, didn't realise it was special enough to have it's own marketing name

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    Sandvik has been holding "Modern Art of Milling" events that demonstrate this and other milling techniques. Very informative without alot of selling.

    It definately works. Try it both ways and listen to the difference when the tool enters the cut.

    Also, it makes a big difference in toollife when dealing with HRSA's. I have experienced this first hand in Inco.

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    Default Oh, no...not the dreaded TOOL WARE

    Quote Originally Posted by dafoosa View Post
    if you don't use chip studies and techniques for chip optimization you waste a great deal of money in unnecessary tool ware.....but the USA has been notorious for WASTE of every kind in the last 100 years. that's why USA is in its death throws. no more dirt cheap resources to rape. Kaizen and sixsigma might help.
    Duhhh...Tungsten doesn't grow here, and it's never been dirt cheap. But I'll tell you one thing: for anything smaller than a 50-person shop it's still a lot cheaper than the time-sinks you just mentioned. Sounds like somebody's metalcutting experience has been acquired from the other side of the window--the one that looks out into the shop.

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    what kinda tool shop ya'll in?
    if you don't use chip studies and techniques for chip optimization you waste a great deal of money in unnecessary tool ware.....but the USA has been notorious for WASTE of every kind in the last 100 years. that's why USA is in its death throws. no more dirt cheap resources to rape. Kaizen and sixsigma might help.
    Hmmm, Well best I can tell "SIXSIGMA" is being thrown out in favor of LEAN and some 5s. (Pesonaly IMO implement a 5's and forget the rest)

    A little research and you will find more people looking for Lean back grounds more than sixsigma.

    As far as chip studies go, If you understand "chip thinning" then anything else is common sense. Since waste is a consideration then I would suggest a cam system with trochordial milling or you can take the cheap way out and call SECO and ask for one of there FREE chip thinning calculators.

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    This looks like climb milling to me. Cutting into the work also gives a clean edge, especially on stainless. This does not work well on conventional machines, like a Bridgeport, unless you have ball screws.


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