Sketchy setups, don't like'em but sometimes ya gotta - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by G00 Proto View Post
    ...On the flip side, if you made a perfect fixture for every onesy twosy part that walked in the door, you would be out of business with a pile of beautiful shiny fixtures
    Lol. I made a beautiful set of matched jaws to hold a handle at a weird angle so I could put some tapped holes in the ends.

    I made the jaws when I prototyped the parts- customer said I would get the production, so I went ahead and did all the work to run them two at a time on my little mill.

    Made the prototypes, last I ever saw of it.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    I'm wondering if an LH spiral RH cut downcut endmill like Onsrud makes for routers would be helpful on a job like that, to push the part down instead of lifting it. Anyone here use them?
    I've used left hand helix cutters for cutting that laminated ship stock so it doesn't come apart.

    I think it would work well in this application, the lifting force is what prevents me from running a higher feedrate.

  3. #23
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    BTW, this is not a flaky setup

    I would never take picture of one of my flaky setups

    Well, first I would have to go pick the stuff up from across the room

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  5. #24
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    These competitions are always too late for me, like the talk of the worst drawings anyone had seen when I had long since thrown mine out. My first lathe bought for business was a circa 1950's Hardinge HC that I still have. Until I bought a 14 x 30 and then a couple CNC Lathes I was the model for don't try this at home on that thing. I made some center sections for some custom generator cases that were 7" diameter and 6" long, which of course required some homemade tool holders. I also made 9" over drive steel crank pulleys, and of course all bar feed jobs I used 2 ladders, with some PVC pipe and zip ties for a stock tube. I still have all my fingers and toes.

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by G00 Proto View Post
    ...My favorite flaky setups are the ones that you do for a couple of proto parts. Then the stupid customer orders 6 of them and you skank by again. Then they order 12 of them, and you skank by again. Then 5 years later you are bemoaning all of the time you've wasted and parts you've scrapped because of this flaky fixture... all to save a couple of hours. On the flip side, if you made a perfect fixture for every onesy twosy part that walked in the door, you would be out of business with a pile of beautiful shiny fixtures...
    Same thing can apply to welded parts. We have a welding and machine shop so we run into it on both sides.
    Get an order for 20 simple parts--not enough value in them to justify a fixture so you cobble something together
    and weld 'em up. Sure enough the job comes back 2-3 times a year and five years later you look back and see
    how much money you could have saved if you'd known how things were going to play out. Sadly, I've never
    found a crystal ball that was any good.

    I think one of the most challenging and at the same time rewarding tasks is setting up oddball parts in a milling
    machine. We're a manual shop only (old farts) but we do a lot of repair oriented work and it can be very interesting
    trying to set up some weird parts while locating centres of existing bores and keeping them perpendicular to the table.
    I've done some pretty creative (and, yes, pretty dodgy) setups over the years...

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  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
    ...I think one of the most challenging and at the same time rewarding tasks is setting up oddball parts in a milling machine. We're a manual shop only (old farts) but we do a lot of repair oriented work and it can be very interesting trying to set up some weird parts while locating centres of existing bores and keeping them perpendicular to the table.
    That's my favorite thing about this trade. I love cobbing up setups on the BP out of the crap lying around the shop.

    I once made a fixture out of a broomstick. I had a bunch of semi-rigid poly tubes about 3/4" diameter and 30" long that needed to be slit full length. I turned down a broomstick to the right diameter, and milled a 3/16" slot full length.

    Then I slid the tube over the broomstick, and used one of those plastic letter openers with a razor blade in it to make the cut. The letter opener fit into the slot to keep the cut a straight line, and it took maybe 1 second to make the cut.

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  11. #27
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    The more "sketchy" setups you do you learn more of the limits of what mini-squall remnants of material are needed to hold a part before becoming a helicopter.
    I have done my fair share, always have the door closed before pushing the button on the cnc , sometimes holding a piece of sheet metal to protect me for parts on the manual machines.
    I made some rocker switch/eye candy bezels that were held in place by (4) 4-40 threaded holes maybe 6 threads deep.
    I made extra threaded blanks thinking I would launch at least a couple.
    Only lost 1 due to a ghost in the machine

    The plus of doing theses kind of parts is when someone asks "How the $&&*$ did you hold this"

    "It was a piece of cake"

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  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post
    I don't think I've ever tried to grab a part by a dowel pin, so I can't say.

    I don't think the spring pin bulges in the hole. I have .800" of it in the vise, and only .200" in the part. I think it squeezes the entire length.

    I don't just drill the hole. I use a 5/32 end mill, plunge and interpolate to .185" dia. I'm fussy about the hole size, and it takes some effort to get the pin in. That's actually the hardest thing about making these parts- installing the pins straight and slot-aligned.

    The complete cycle is about 4 minutes, prolly half of that is the first profile pass.
    a slip fit hole for the spring pin in the ram of a cheap little arbor press might make a slick setup for installing those pins strait and oriented.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluejeep View Post
    a slip fit hole for the spring pin in the ram of a cheap little arbor press might make a slick setup for installing those pins strait and oriented.
    That's what I am doing, with a shop made press. I get it all lined up, then wail on it with a dead blow, lol. Get the pin about 80% set, then I have a piece of aluminum .800" thick with a clearance hole. Place that over the partially set pin and set to depth with a few taps of the ball peen.


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