Slitting Saw technique. - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    If I noticed any run out on the stub arbor theres no way I would continue as its going to result in heart ache.Hate it when you start a new job go looking for a a holder and they all run out a mile WTF do they keep them throw them out they are going to help you produce a lot of scrap and not only that bend any new saws you use on them.So you start from scratch which is best way in long run.First tram the head for peace of mind skim the OD of bar and put it in holder.Tipped tool in vise and proceed to turn your stub arbor take it out Drill/tap end-and cut a k/way.Better still if you can put it in nose of machine and turn it off columne then guarnteed no run out.I would have it on about 60revs and ins min feed go to full depth plenty coolant slow yes but cant see you having any problems and thats using a hss blade obviously faster with a tipped saw.Plenty stub arbors turned true and the saw runs out a mile its not,the arbor. Its the saw is bent by people using good saws on crap arbors resulting in crap saws that are always going to run out even on a perfect arbor.Try and keep the arbor in holder purely for sawing if you have enough spare holders

  2. #22
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    I do a slitting job four or five times a year. Just did it again yesterday. 1018CR. 3/4" thick parts stacked 11 deep Slotting from the outside to a feature hole near the middle of the part. It's also an interrupted cut because I"m passing thru a 3/8 bolt clearance hole. Imagine a 3/4" X 2" X 3" part with a hole on the face near the middle, a cross drilled hole for a pinch bolt and slotted to allow pinching. I do 44 up in two vises. Run time is 2 1/4 minutes. That's 33" of cutting.

    I use the SECO 335.10 series steel body CB insert saws without coolant. They are awesome. Worth every penny too. Started with HSS years ago. So painfully slow I couldn't stand it. And yes any rounout there makes them scary.

    Yesterday I ran the SECO 4" for the first time. (0.089 thick and 7 teeth.) All this is done on a 90's YCI Supermax with a 4:1 reduction gearbox. Barely budged the power meter past the first line. (7 1/2 HP continuous motor)

    One part - 0.62 DOC - 756 RPM 22.7 IPM. (Run Time 2 1/4 minutes)

    2nd part - 0.825 DOC - 544 RPM - 18.3 IPM (Forgot to check run time)

    The cross drilled hole sort of brutalized this 2nd run, so I changed it to two passes. 0.62 then 0.825 DOC at 611 RPM 27.8IPM

    I couldn't get the runout better than 0.0017 but didn't seen to matter. BTW climb milling.

    I previously ran many parts with a 3" 0.158 (4mm) version without problems also.

    Granted these aren't the depths the OP is after. Still the SECO speeds and feed literature has SFM and IPT for up to 30% of cutter diameter. Which is completely possible in a single pass at speed.

    Dave
    Last edited by 13engines; 10-15-2019 at 02:23 PM. Reason: Added climb milling.

  3. Likes BRIAN.T liked this post
  4. #23
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    I would love to see how a solid carbide saw would do compared to the indexable. Staggerred tooth with a Tialn coating. 64 or 48 teeth.
    Sure the cutter is more expensive. But if it lasts 2-3 times longer what is your time worth when changing the inserts? Anyway 750 rpms for a 4" and 22ipm is a great speen. Great job!

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRIAN.T View Post
    What's the theory behind conventional milling with a saw I wonder?
    Not breaking teeth, by not climbing on top of the material in excess of the teeths' ability to cut.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    QT:[That's a very good idea, I've never considered turning an arbor in my mill before.]
    With the arbor made/turned in an end mill holder , mark the spindle nose, the holder and the arbor so everything goes back all lines matching and it will run true when replaced. Keyed arbor is best for saws.
    Also a good idea, however my machines have asymmetrical dogs, so problem solved!

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by G00 Proto View Post
    Have you ever tried climb cutting with a Skill Saw...
    Haha I see what you're saying. To be honest, I just climb everything, as one should on cnc, save for a few odd extrusions and what not.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by 13engines View Post
    I do a slitting job four or five times a year. Just did it again yesterday. 1018CR. 3/4" thick parts stacked 11 deep Slotting from the outside to a feature hole near the middle of the part. It's also an interrupted cut because I"m passing thru a 3/8 bolt clearance hole. Imagine a 3/4" X 2" X 3" part with a hole on the face near the middle, a cross drilled hole for a pinch bolt and slotted to allow pinching. I do 44 up in two vises. Run time is 2 1/4 minutes. That's 33" of cutting.

    I use the SECO 335.10 series steel body CB insert saws without coolant. They are awesome. Worth every penny too. Started with HSS years ago. So painfully slow I couldn't stand it. And yes any rounout there makes them scary.

    Yesterday I ran the SECO 4" for the first time. (0.089 thick and 7 teeth.) All this is done on a 90's YCI Supermax with a 4:1 reduction gearbox. Barely budged the power meter past the first line. (7 1/2 HP continuous motor)

    One part - 0.62 DOC - 756 RPM 22.7 IPM. (Run Time 2 1/4 minutes)

    2nd part - 0.825 DOC - 544 RPM - 18.3 IPM (Forgot to check run time)

    The cross drilled hole sort of brutalized this 2nd run, so I changed it to two passes. 0.62 then 0.825 DOC at 611 RPM 27.8IPM

    I couldn't get the runout better than 0.0017 but didn't seen to matter. BTW climb milling.

    I previously ran many parts with a 3" 0.158 (4mm) version without problems also.

    Granted these aren't the depths the OP is after. Still the SECO speeds and feed literature has SFM and IPT for up to 30% of cutter diameter. Which is completely possible in a single pass at speed.

    Dave
    Man, I love the idea of an insert cutter. I looked into iscar's version, and with everything I need (inserts, arbor, holder, saw) I was at about $1500, which to me seems a no brainier given the amount of time I've spent half ass sawing these parts. But alas, we don't think this job is going to repeat, so I've decided to just power through the rest of the parts. But if it ever comes back, or something similar I'll all over that thing.

  9. #28
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    The insert saws are great but if you blow one up it really is an expensive exercise. I had a post somewhere on here a while ago about a 2mm thick Iscar blade that got trashed. After the quote for a new one I eventually just landed up with a HSS one.

    I have also screwed up a pocket on a 5mm thick one by being an idiot in a rush... Quickly modifying a program and the dreaded G00 instead of G01 landed up at the first feed movement after a quick change to it. Rapids were all down... looked at the approach, all looked good till I thought I was feeding and cranked the rapids up. Thankfully I caught it before it blew up but it now has one less insert.

    I learnt as others said that with slitting conventional is the way to go. It just sounds and "feels" better. The main issues I have had it trying to get the chips out on deep slots, you arent really getting coolant to the cutting area. It seems as though a lower RPM and a bit more aggressive feed is the key to getting the tips and and out the cut.

  10. #29
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    5" od solid carbide slitting saws are now in stock. Tialn coated and staggered tooth. From .0469-.140 widths...

    Solid Carbide Circular Sawblades - MariTool

  11. #30
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    We sell HSS, solid carbide, and inserted carbide saws, and can provide application support as well. Our cutting tools are US-made.

    Martindale / Gaylee
    Martindale, Circular Saw Blades, Rotary Burs, Undercutters, Abrasives, Grinders, Electrical Test Equipment, Hand Tools, Etchers: Martindale, Electric Motor Repair Tools, Metal Cutting Saw Blades
    216-521-8567


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