Slow Speed Impact for Part Change? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    We have 6 of these floating around the shop in 1/4" drive. They give the perfect amount of torque for what we use them for and if something happens the snap on guy swings by the next day and will deal with a replacement .


  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by dstryr View Post
    We have 6 of these floating around the shop in 1/4" drive. They give the perfect amount of torque for what we use them for and if something happens the snap on guy swings by the next day and will deal with a replacement .

    The Qualichem 250c turns the soft grips into a nasty goo. You seeing the same thing? Have had poor luck with them, our snapon never stands behind them. Hoping the Milwaukee grips hold up better.

  3. #23
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    I've used a regular 'ol DeWalt cordless drill in the past and just set the torque limiter so it wouldn't "over tighten".

    You can get adapters that you can chuck in 1/4 or 3/8 drive.

    Just about all of my fixtures use shcs's. I just take an allen wrench and cut the short end off so I can chuck onto the hex.

    Sounds like this is something you're trying to fool proof for an operator?

  4. #24
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    We have a fixture that we use a T handle allen to loosen 2 turns, but we go back to tighten with the cordless drill with trq set. Not sure how it would work to loosen? Might need to set the trq higher to loosen and then turn down to tighten?


    Forget the rubber handles...
    My old Sears Craftsman drill that we never used for any production hardly had a shop rag zip tied to the handle.
    At least one of our Milwaukee's have been this way for a few years at least already.

    These things are made for carpenters, not oil.
    Don't waste too much time searching for a rubber handle that will not get gummy....


    -----------------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    We have a fixture that we use a T handle allen to loosen 2 turns, but we go back to tighten with the cordless drill with trq set. Not sure how it would work to loosen? Might need to set the trq higher to loosen and then turn down to tighten?
    In my app I run two "pallets" that are held in a kurt vise (changing parts on one while the other is machining).

    What I do is give the drill a counter clockwise twist with my hand as I pull the trigger. This works really well for me.

    Not sure how your fixture is set up, so if it is bolted to the table or an indexer this may not be feasible.

    Another thought is have 2 drills one tighten one loosen and some way to identify which is which.


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