Soft Jaw best practices? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    One thing I have done (99% I got the idea here) to run multiple parts in a set of jaws is to make miniature "floating" jaws that are doweled to your main jaw, with a belleville/spring washer on each dowel. I've done up to six small parts across in a single jaw that way since the washers put even pressure on every part. This was for stamped parts that needed secondary/tertiary oeprations.

    Another thing I've found indispensable is to use roll pins or press fit dowels in the face of a rear jaw to hold things on angles or otherwise support odd shapes. It is much faster than cutting a full set of soft jaws if the geometry allows.

    I mickey mouse ear all corners or tight radii.

    I usually cut 0.001" large.

    If possible, I use a form in the rear jaw only and a flat step on the front jaw so I don't have to worry about alignment. Otherwise I will make sure to stick them up against a 1-2-3 block (or similar) when I first install them, prior to cutting the shape, to keep them aligned upon reinstallation.

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  3. #42
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    I bore my jaws at size or .003 under, and almost always undercut the corner .030 for both better grip and relief for sawcut burr, or sharp edge.
    Another issue can be at what pressure to bore the jaws. If you are holding op1 rough stock, bore the jaws at the same pressure you are going to run the job, usually all the way up. For the more delicate op2, bore the jaws at “half” pressure, same as you will run the job.
    Reverse your t-nuts to get maximum clamping area on the master jaw.
    I never use aluminum jaws on steel parts. Except for pie jaws.
    If you need to change your chucking pressure after running a part, get a new zeroset.
    Use a sharpie to mark the diameter of the bored jaws when you take them off. It’ll save you time later.

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  5. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Finsta View Post
    One thing I have done (99% I got the idea here) to run multiple parts in a set of jaws is to make miniature "floating" jaws that are doweled to your main jaw, with a belleville/spring washer on each dowel. I've done up to six small parts across in a single jaw that way since the washers put even pressure on every part. This was for stamped parts that needed secondary/tertiary oeprations.
    I'd love to see a picture of this!

    Sent via CNC 88HS

  6. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by vandytech View Post
    I bore my jaws at size or .003 under....

    Snip.....
    Thank you! So far I think we'd all been talking mill jaws but we got lathes too.

    Sent via CNC 88HS

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    I should have read along more closely. Ugh. But I stand by the technique, it’s just done on the other side of the plant… No more posting after 10pm!

  8. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cole2534 View Post
    I'd love to see a picture of this!

    Sent via CNC 88HS
    Unfortunately that was at the old shop and since one of the toolmakers whipped them up on a knee mill I don't have solid models, either. If you search the site you should be able to find discussion on the technique. I'm positive someone here taught it to me.

  9. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripperj View Post
    Do you guys reuse you soft jaws for the same job, as in they have been taken off and reinstalled?
    Do you make any kind of alignment marks or features to get both halves lined up.

    The few that I have made I had the jaws touching the vise base and eyeballed up the left side even when installing the blanks. I then took a skim cut off the top and left side (maybe 1/8” cut 1/2” deep off the side), figuring I could indicate them back in.
    I still had to fiddle around to get the movable jaw lined up nice. It’s a Kurt DX6

    Would have been quicker to make new. I broke down and ordered Monster Jaw 10 packs for $140 shipped.

    Thanks


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Dovetail jaws I mark to use again.




    jaw-2.jpg


    jaw-1.jpg

    Edit - to add.

    Before I sold the Bridgeport I was using and Abwood vice, the fixed jaw was removed and one soft jaw bolted in its place, the moving soft jaw run on two dowels and a couple of springs to push the jaws open.

    Don't have Bridgeport now, but have old jig in scrap bin used on the bench drill for tapping. Since then bought a different vice with pins in the jaws so a couple of holes in the soft jaws locate on the vice pins.



    softjaw.jpg



    603e9fde-4674-472a-8494-9d1397a19295.jpg

  10. #48
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    I don't do soft jaws often, but when I do...

    I dowel them together, one press fit, one slip fit, and don't tighten the moving jaw on the vise.
    .


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