Speeds and Feeds for Lake Shore TAS endmill
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  1. #1
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    Default Speeds and Feeds for Lake Shore TAS endmill

    TAS The Aluminum Shredder

    So I recently bought this endmill, after watching NYC CNC using the 3/8 TAS. I'm looking to use this, and I want a good place to start. I'm not sure what FPT to use, and when I calculate my speed, I use 250*4/.25 and I get 4,000. Does anyone have any insight on some good places to start with a speed, and some good places for my feeds? I'm using this on a Tormach 1100 series 3, the spindle maxes at 5140.

    Any help is appreciated. Thank you.

    P.S. Does anyone have any links for a good finishing endmill for aluminum?? Any recommendations is helpful as well.

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    Have you tried the manufacturer's website? Speeds and feeds are listed under technical resources.

    You're also running a tormach you won't be able to push that endmill anywhere near as hard it could work and your speeds and feeds will be dependant on the wet noodle you're working with not the tool.

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    On my mill I'd run 8K RPM (max for the machine) and depending on how much engagement I programmed, and the contours being cut, up to 200 IPM feed.

    You might get info more appropriate to the Tormach on a hobby oriented forum.

    It's aluminum, basically shiny plastic. Any good quality, sharp, uncoated carbide mill will give an excellent finish in a good machine.

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    A similar tool from Maritool suggests .0038" in/tooth and 800 sfm, about 8100rpm for that tool.

    Sent from my SM-G930R4 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by TurboDude93 View Post
    TAS The Aluminum Shredder

    after watching NYC CNC using the 3/8 TAS. I'm looking to use this, and I want a good place to start.
    isn't that exactly what his videos are ? He tells you the "recipe" to use, and he has an army of Tormachs ?

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    Nice looking tool.

    Run as much RPM as you are comfortable with and work off of the load meter.
    If profiling, start at .006 IPT with a 30% step over, up to full flute length in Z.
    If slotting, go 1 times diameter deep at .004 IPT.
    Watch the land meter and listen to the machine. It will tell you what it wants.
    If your fixturing is tolerant and the machine wants more, increase your feed in 10% increments and watch the load meter.

    If you can get to 80% load and the part hasn't flown or the spindle hasn't taken a dump .. you're there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by exkenna View Post
    Nice looking tool.

    Run as much RPM as you are comfortable with and work off of the load meter.
    If profiling, start at .006 IPT with a 30% step over, up to full flute length in Z.
    If slotting, go 1 times diameter deep at .004 IPT.
    Watch the land meter and listen to the machine. It will tell you what it wants.
    If your fixturing is tolerant and the machine wants more, increase your feed in 10% increments and watch the load meter.

    If you can get to 80% load and the part hasn't flown or the spindle hasn't taken a dump .. you're there.
    The load meter is an accessory on a Tormach. Hope he sprung for it!

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    Eyes and ears then!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TurboDude93 View Post
    TAS The Aluminum Shredder

    So I recently bought this endmill, after watching NYC CNC using the 3/8 TAS. I'm looking to use this, and I want a good place to start. I'm not sure what FPT to use, and when I calculate my speed, I use 250*4/.25 and I get 4,000. Does anyone have any insight on some good places to start with a speed, and some good places for my feeds? I'm using this on a Tormach 1100 series 3, the spindle maxes at 5140.

    Any help is appreciated. Thank you.

    P.S. Does anyone have any links for a good finishing endmill for aluminum?? Any recommendations is helpful as well.
    Your Tool is fine. Unless Indiana has an extra .05" per Inch your formula is inaccurate. SFM*3.82/D is correct. SFM*4/D is rounding Pi, which is gay. (no offense to our gay friends, Sir Isaac Newton or Archimedes)

    But just curious why such a low SFM? I cannot think of any reason to select such a slow speed for Aluminum. Even when you're working with toy Machinery, 250 SFM is painfully slow. Max the Spindle out.

    R

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    Rob his spindle maxes at 5100 RPM, that’ll get your eyebrow twitching.

    I’d say the hobbyist guys like lower SFM because they lack flood coolant and less heat is less melty.


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