Start with schedule 160 1" seamless tube, or solid rod ?
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  1. #1
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    Default Start with schedule 160 1" seamless tube, or solid rod ?

    Part is 304 stainless, finishes at 1.125 +/- .005 OD, .862 +.003 - 0 ID, 3.25 long, ends perpendicular to bore .002 max and ends flat within .001, bore to OD runout .0025 max. Have not got pricing on tube versus rod, so I don't know what the difference in material cost is yet. 1,500 parts. This isn't something we normally would do, so I'm not familiar with the problems with tube (runout, coincentricity, straightness). If you do this kind of thing would you go with tube or solid? BTW, tube is 1.315 OD by .815 ID nominal.

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    Factor in the variability of quality on the material (304 is the A36 of the stainless world), and risks to tooling and optimized F/S. If the price can be adjusted to account for it, I'd look into getting a Carpenter or other premium stainless rod and drilling it out.

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    I’d pick 1-1/8 solid. Drop them complete.
    My experience with tubing is it sucks.

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    Technically speaking, isn't that pipe? If so, it's only loosely round with some sort of axial void meant for holding fluids on the inside. Joking, kinda.

    I'd prefer drilling rods.

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    I don’t know anything about stainless but for us 1026 tubing always seems to have these gnarly long chips that get hung up everywhere. If solid stainless is easy enough to machine I would consider drilling it out...especially if you can pipe coolant through your .862” drill!

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    Go with rod and avoid the headaches.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk

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    I would also go with solid. I have also found that it's hard to find SS tube in stock that isn't super common. At least here in the north east. I usually get a regret from the supplier.
    An insert drill will smoke that out pretty quick

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    I'm going to go against the majority here and say if its seamless I would go that route. Its obviously faster to bore a hole then to drill and bore a hole.


    On edit, your title says seamless so yeah....

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    Only issue is seamless tube isn't always the same size, not perfect round, tool loads change and inserts wear funny or premature.

    At that qty I'd skip all that and bar feed / pull solid bar

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    Quote Originally Posted by as9100d View Post
    Only issue is seamless tube isn't always the same size, not perfect round, tool loads change and inserts wear funny or premature.

    At that qty I'd skip all that and bar feed / pull solid bar

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
    Step up from 160 to XXS which will be .599" ID and run an inserted drill down it first. Should still be faster than solid bar. Just how I would want to do it, although material price and availability in small quantity would most likely cause me to use solid anyway.

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    I've had issues with tube in the past, it's like cast material with inclusions that destroy inserts. Idk why

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by as9100d View Post
    I've had issues with tube in the past, it's like cast material with inclusions that destroy inserts. Idk why

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
    I've played with a fair amount of boiler tubing and seen lots of xrays. Never seen an inclusion in the tube that wasn't installed by a welder Not that they don't exist but that has been my experience. Now cheaper "pipe" and seamed stuff, yeah I wouldn't be surprised to see inclusions and hard spots.

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    We run tons of smaller 304 ss in our screw machine and miyano. its cuts like butter. but its also quality tubing and cold finish. for bigger stuff 1/2" and bigger I prefer to run as a solid seems in my experience the bigger stuff kills tooling pretty fast. worse yet if you buy tubing with scale on it

    my vote for solid

    insert drill work fantastic in 304

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    I make a lot of lipped 304 bushings. My sugestion would be to find a thicker wall material with some meat on the OD/ID so you can take a nice cut. If to light a cut it becomes hell.

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    Cole is correct, the OP is referring to pipe not tube. There is a difference between the two in both terminology and specification.

    Based on McMaster, 1-1/4" solid rod will be about half the price of the 1" Sch 160 pipe mentioned, or 1-1/4" OD x 3/4" ID tube.

    No direct experience with 304, but if it's anything like mild steel, tube will machine much better than pipe, as Delw and Hardplates suggest.

    The SS tube on McMaster is +-0.005" OD, but not available from them in 1-1/8", which is likely reflective of other suppliers. So this looks like a job from solid either way.

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    Many years ago, I fought and fought a Machined tube of 304. It was bigger than the OP's, but it was a bear. About 1/4 of the lot had to be literally forced into Tolerance post Machining. It was some schedule seamless to start. It was high quality material, and respected distributor.

    IMO Solid

    R

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    So RJT, after all the back and forth what are you thinking?

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    Take a variable out of the mix and go with solid.

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  26. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJT View Post
    Take a variable out of the mix and go with solid.
    Sounds like a plan. And when things go tits-up you can blame us...

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    Quote Originally Posted by RJT View Post
    Take a variable out of the mix and go with solid.
    What just happened? Someone posted a question, got feedback, AND posted the final decision.....

    R

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