Threaded (Screw-in) Milling Cutters
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    Default Threaded (Screw-in) Milling Cutters

    I would like to use a threaded milling cutter like a mini face mill in my Brother. These would be a cutter body that I could use in one of the threaded body tool holders that Maritool sells. I looked just a little and the prices of the name brand cutter bodies seemed very high- like $200-$300. Shars I think had them but I am skeptical of their quality.

    Can anybody recommend a good one that is "affordable"?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Deal View Post
    I would like to use a threaded milling cutter like a mini face mill in my Brother. These would be a cutter body that I could use in one of the threaded body tool holders that Maritool sells. I looked just a little and the prices of the name brand cutter bodies seemed very high- like $200-$300. Shars I think had them but I am skeptical of their quality.

    Can anybody recommend a good one that is "affordable"?
    ISCAR Milling Product Line

    I know that won't qualify as affordable, but they work damn good (not sure on the linked "long" length, but in general). What was nice for us using 3/8 cutter heads we could pair them with a 8mm shank and make a reduced neck endmill, with a replaceable tip!

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    Mitsubishi has a similar line, but for us at least, the tended to be more expensive than the ISCAR line when we looked into them.

    They are really handy in turning centers because you can quickly change the insert and not have to reset the tool.

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    Maybe i am calling them by the wrong name but i meant cutters with inserts. I don’t see where iscar has those. Like these.
    25mm Modular 90 degree Indexable End Mill Milling Cutting Head APKT Insert - Indexable Milling - Indexable Cutting - Products

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    Well I can't say that I recall ever seeing those before.

    That tool begs one question:

    Why?

    I don't git it.


    ... and $60?
    These things must not even be made in China!

    ???




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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Well I can't say that I recall ever seeing those before.

    That tool begs one question:

    Why?

    I don't git it.


    ... and $60?
    These things must not even be made in China!

    ???




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    Ox
    I have a couple like that by Tungaloy and Sandvik.

    The utility of them lies in the shanks rather than the cutter itself.

    Get that on the end of a 7-10xD solid carbide shank and it's a real problem solver.

    They go down to 16mm with inserted heads. Solid carbide only below that. I use the solid carbide ones very frequently.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    Well I can't say that I recall ever seeing those before.

    That tool begs one question:

    Why?

    I don't git it.


    ... and $60?
    These things must not even be made in China!

    ???




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    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox
    In a production shop, the head and inserts can be swapped in a minute or so, and if you clean everything before you put it back together, both Z height and diameter should repeat within a half a thou, at least on the name brand products.

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    I understand the solid screw on tips, but if you are going to have an inserted one, why not have it on a solid shank?


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    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    I understand the solid screw on tips, but if you are going to have an inserted one, why not have it on a solid shank?


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    Because you can use different heads on one shank - ball / flat / corner rad etc...? I've not used an inserted one, but the other ones are great, gets dull or chips, just screw a new one in and go. No need to touch back off or whatnot (unless you are working down in the tenths range maybe)...

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    I've wondered how those type cutter were.
    Not seen much talk about them in the past.

    I would think that any product brought to market would be pretty good - otherwise they just wouldn't sell - but you never know....


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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    I've wondered how those type cutter were.
    Not seen much talk about them in the past.

    I would think that any product brought to market would be pretty good - otherwise they just wouldn't sell - but you never know....


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    The Iscar guy was here last week, trying to sell me their multi master system. The solid carbide heads run in the $80/ea range, depending on size. I told him it's not worth it for me when a 1/8" endmill is huge in my world, and an MAFord is only about $12.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TeachMePlease View Post
    The Iscar guy was here last week, trying to sell me their multi master system. The solid carbide heads run in the $80/ea range, depending on size. I told him it's not worth it for me when a 1/8" endmill is huge in my world, and an MAFord is only about $12.
    To be fair, everything changes when you get into small stuff. We pretty routinely use .006 & .007 & .010" endmills and drills, it takes some getting used to...

    The multimaster is great in the 3/8" or so range. We ran a couple different "heads" a 40/50deg chamfer head for our product line (different job), and 3/8" 5 or 6 flute finisher on an 8mm carbide shank so we we could get 2-3" of reach. When you get into extended reach / mulitple heads is where the value is IMO, not just replacing 'regular' endmills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    To be fair, everything changes when you get into small stuff. We pretty routinely use .006 & .007 & .010" endmills and drills, it takes some getting used to...

    The multimaster is great in the 3/8" or so range. We ran a couple different "heads" a 40/50deg chamfer head for our product line (different job), and 3/8" 5 or 6 flute finisher on an 8mm carbide shank so we we could get 2-3" of reach. When you get into extended reach / mulitple heads is where the value is IMO, not just replacing 'regular' endmills.
    Iscar is really trying to break into the Swiss market... Unfortunately, they're starting from behind the curve... Pretty much everything he brings in to show me has already been done by Sandvik or someone else, and usually slightly better. I almost feel bad for the guy when I say things like "Unless it's both quick change AND coolant through, I'm not interested"... But he takes it in stride and keeps trying.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ox View Post
    I understand the solid screw on tips, but if you are going to have an inserted one, why not have it on a solid shank?


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    An example application would be on a live tooled lathe. When switching over jobs, just swap the heads on a few tools.

    You could even touch off the shanks and comp for head length within each program, so you never have to touch off tools.

    Unfortunately for us, most of our live tools consist of standard length endmills, drills, threadmills, dovetail cutters, and keyseat cutters, none of which are easily replaceable by a screw-on head tool.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orange Vise View Post
    An example application would be on a live tooled lathe. When switching over jobs, just swap the heads on a few tools.

    You could even touch off the shanks and comp for head length within each program, so you never have to touch off tools.

    Unfortunately for us, most of our live tools consist of standard length endmills, drills, threadmills, dovetail cutters, and keyseat cutters, none of which are easily replaceable by a screw-on head tool.
    ISCAR Cutting Tools - Metal Working Tools - Milling - Chamfering & Bottom Deburring

    ISCAR Cutting Tools - Metal Working Tools - Milling - "T" Slotting

    ISCAR Cutting Tools - Metal Working Tools - Milling - Profiling

    ISCAR Cutting Tools - Metal Working Tools - Milling - Internal Thread Milling

    They actually make them in just about everything. Now if the shank - head combo works for you is another thing.

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    What if you break the head off and the shank is down in there yet?
    I'd guess that it is now loose and should back right out?


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    Multi Masters- - they made their money back on us.

    I went to an Iscar seminar a couple years ago and won a Carbide shank with two 5/8" carbide heads. That was the most expensive "free" ever.

    My guy told me he loved them as it was 5/8" and we usually use 3/8 and 1/2 so these he liked being more robust, so I bought a couple more heads.

    Then a couple roughing finishing heads...then he broke the shank. Apparently one still needs to retract All the Way up to clear the taller features, even with Multi-masters.

    So it was a new carbide shank, plus a backup and a HSS shank for standard work.
    Then he started to brake the heads like candy...

    So I'm thinking maybe skip buying more heads, but I had almost a grand in shanks...that's dumb.

    So a few more heads, and a few more heads, and a few more heads...then I find several broken shanks and the one he's using was all buggered up so of course the heads are not lasting.

    That was it...pulled them all from the floor.

    I use a little now as needed.

    Nice Idea, but not best for general day to day milling.

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    My exp is pretty opposite of SIM. We used the 3/8 guy on a good 50% of our work and never broke anything, even at 6x-8x diameter in not so rigid setups. We did chip a flute here and there, and they got replaced for wear when needed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    My exp is pretty opposite of SIM. We used the 3/8 guy on a good 50% of our work and never broke anything, even at 6x-8x diameter in not so rigid setups. We did chip a flute here and there, and they got replaced for wear when needed.
    I broke one once, first time I ever used one. It fell apart at the brazed join. A Sandvik one, 10mm ball nose, long shank. I think I let the edges get too dull and it overloaded the shank.

    Never broke another since.

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    I should clarify a little bit...I initially ran, liked them, did some programming for them with decent results before putting them on the floor.

    Once they hit the floor it was downhill. I do not believe it was the tools fault, but the people behind the tool.
    If I left the replacement heads outside, we went through them like candy. If I left the heads inside the office with a request to get a new one...they would not change heads when worn, chipped etc...and that's bad. Worn tools would break in an awefully bad way...heads snapped off often damaging the shank, so it was a head and a shank.

    The other issue is for along tool you could only use it like a stub as flute length was short...I started to move into high speed tool paths around then.


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