Tooling to reliably drill Tubing - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Colman View Post
    I have another approach that I have used in volume production, you have a hollow plug that fits inside the tube with a pair of holes that line up with the holes in the tube. With a suitable bush in line with the top hole it is possible to drill through the top of the tube withou trouble, the lower hole in the plug becomes the drill bush for the second hole.
    After drilling the plug can be withdrawn and the holes bought to size with a reamer, drill or endmill.
    That would be a nice solution if I had these on a drill press. Some holes are a few feet from the end of the tube.

  2. #22
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    I use allied gen2 ta inserts on 1 1/4 pipe and 1 1/2 x .12 hss without much effort on a drill line. No coolant (odd sizes) makes me go to mechanics length twist bits (Viking brand works better than butterfeild once you have settings down, not as forgiving). Use a little longer initial feed rate at beginning of each hole - you are never going to hit true flat on start of holes. Twist bits are figured at 45 seconds thru hole on pipe, allied is 25 seconds. Rapid between top web and bottom web with 3/32" slow approach above top of bottom web. Then for 7/16, I run bits on flanges and do both holes simultaneously, because I have those tool holders.
    Can you use tube plasma if parts are going to weld after? cheaper and faster than laser, slower than drill with coolant, a lot more forgiving and easier to program.

  3. #23
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    Another idea.. A piece of timber turned to the ID of the jobs..... Smash it right up there into the tube. "All is rigiid".. Use a short carb to do your 1st hole.... long series to do ya throu hole? With a long series highspeed highfeed carbide?

  4. #24
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    I picked up 4 Cobalt 7/16" drills yesterday. Going to test things out the cheap way first. I got quotes back on flat bottom drills from Nachi, the standard drills are on promo for ~$120/ea and that same drill with radiused corners is at standard price of about ~$250/ea. I'd rather find a solution that doesn't murder me in tooling costs.

    I think the cobalts might have the perk of being able to feed slower than carbide so they won't cause the tube to spring so much on breakthrough and might save the corners of the drills.

    When I was doing this by hand I found the best method was to do a small pilot around 1/8", and then go straight to 7/16" with drills that were really pointy, almost like wood drills. I was hand grinding them but they were probably around 80-90 degree point angle. That was the best solution for the corners of the drills.

  5. #25
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    Check out the YG1 dream flat bottom drills. I've only tried them on one job but tool life was great, and way cheaper then the Nachi. Think I got a couple YG1 and one Nachi, didn't wear out the first YG1 to even try the Nachi.


    YG-1: BEST VALUE IN THE WORLD OF CUTTING TOOLS

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kapster View Post
    Check out the YG1 dream flat bottom drills. I've only tried them on one job but tool life was great, and way cheaper then the Nachi. Think I got a couple YG1 and one Nachi, didn't wear out the first YG1 to even try the Nachi.


    YG-1: BEST VALUE IN THE WORLD OF CUTTING TOOLS
    I’ll check them out. I looked st them first but everyone recommended Nachi for that style. I’ll see what their prices look like. I’ve been happy with the other YG1 stuff I’ve used

  7. #27
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    I have the programs fairly dialed in now. I am using a 7/16" cobalt drill to drill the top of the holes in the tube, then coming in with a 3/8" end mill and opening those holes up a pinch to take care of the burr and give a clearance for the drill bit, then back to the drill bit going rapid to the bottom and drilling the lower portion of the hole. Clearing the top hole with the end mill is for process safety. If the drill bit is a bit off-center of the tube, it's easy for it to drill one hole but it starts squealing once it's deep enough to drill the second hole. The drill pops the easy top holes and keeps chips mostly out of the tube, then the end mill clearances that bore .020", then the drill goes straight for the bottom hole without rubbing anything.

    Time is down to 1:28 for 4 holes (including 3 broken tool detections). This is down from ~5:30 doing helical interpolation with an end mill. I'm about 500 holes in with the first cobalt drill and it is still looking healthy, just starting to show the first signs of edge wear, and the corners are still holding sharp.

    I found that the burr is much worse on the internal portion of the upper hole than the lower hole. The upper hole gets cleaned up by the end mill. The lower hole internal burr is almost non-existent. Lower hole external burr is more than I'd like but can be cleaned up quickly with a roloc disc as these parts get powder coated. Feed rate was important in controlling the burr, right now I'm turning the cobalt 7/16" drill at 900rpm and going .004"/rev and everything has been running great.

    I think a flat-bottom drill would be a better solution overall, however comparing a $120 drill to a $12 drill and $30 end mill combo has me wondering if it's splitting hairs for my volume.

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