Turcite replacement on Kitamura - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    How many times do you normally have to blue up and flip a table like that while scraping to get a good pattern? Assuming a less than journeyman scraper hand, and "so don't get hung up trying to do too good of a job." as stated. I have a machine that may need it on the X and pondering my options.
    I was thinking the same question!

    Also, why pullscrape - is it because the material is softer, and less likey to "dig in" compared to pushing?

    Lastly, the cheaper VMCs and Lathes out of Taiwan, always were box compared to linear rail. I was told by various MTBs that it was because the companies could make more money making box because it was labour (someone doing it) opposed to the added expense of buying in rails.
    I always wondered - does this sound correct?

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMF_TomB View Post
    normally when i redo turcite old turcite is removed, its cleaned, turcite epoxied on with special clamps that apply continuous pressure, clamps removed epoxy cleaned up with dynafile.
    ....part is put in cnc mill aligned to <.0002" per 40" and its machined usually oil grooved milled in as part of program connecting to oil lube holes. other part of slide aligned in cnc mill and machined to remove wear spots often its <.004" wear
    .
    have no ideal what it costs, obviously have to check oil lube holes not plugged. milled surfaces often closely spaced waves .0003" TIR and most know thats not a bad thing. basically you can create closely spaced waves to hold oil of almost any desired amount of waviness. sometimes the glue surfaces are deliberately made wavy and rough so epoxy and turcite sticks better or stronger to the cast iron
    This is the way to go, I've done many transfer line saddles over the years this way, these things run none-stop and I've never had a come back on them. 10hrs labour max for that job, we'd still charge around £1800-£2200.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by vegard View Post
    Other Brother- can you help me understand your post- you say it needs to be fitted to the saddle. I would think the ways are square and parallel, so wouldn't the turcite just need to be flat and parallel to the table surface? and generally the right thickness for the ball screw location (although there is wiggle room there)
    It seems the "fitting" would be done by setting the gibs and the cam bolts that pull up the keepers. This is probably a moot point, but I am just trying to understand.

    Thanks

    Vegard
    Hi Vegard,

    Yes, you have a good understanding of what to do generally. A rebuild shop isn't going to replace just the Turcite on the flat ways, they will strip all of the Turcite from the table, keeper plates, and the gibs. Then they will spend a lot of time prepping and etching all of the surfaces so this doesn't happen again. Then they will glue all new Turcite and scrape it so everything fits precisely and aligned to the y-axis plane, and yes the ballscrew too. It would be hard, nearly impossible to replace all of the Turcite without having the ways which is the master for the x-axis table. It would be interesting to know if you find any professional rebuilding shop that would do it without the saddle.

    If you were close to me I would definitely help you glue some Turcite on to replace the bad stuff, scrape it for bearing, freehand the oil grooves, and slap it back on and go like the other posters have suggested, but I am not a professional.

    That is why I suggested hosting a class and doing it yourself as you probably only need to replace the Turcite that is bad, especially if you don't check the other axis for the same condition.

    Daryl

  4. #24
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    Flip the table onto a bench, then use the saddle to scrap in the table. I'd guess the saddle is less weight than the table.

    I used an engine crane to R&R the table on my Fadal, but it has hard ways and just needed some cleanup and a little stoning.

    My Fadal table was probably 400lbs if I had to guess.


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