What are laydown threading inserts?
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    Default What are laydown threading inserts?

    Hi

    What are laydown threading inserts?
    Why do they call laydown?
    Do they need special holders?


    Thank you

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    It machines the entire thread form, not just the root, like a partial profile insert would.

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    You can get both topping inserts or partial profile inserts in laydown or in top notch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    You can get both topping inserts or partial profile inserts in laydown or in top notch.
    Cool. I was unaware of that!

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    Quote Originally Posted by M Code View Post
    What are laydown threading inserts?
    Triangular threading inserts, with one cutting position per corner.
    Why do they call laydown?
    Because the triangle is oriented in a horizontal plane, as if it were lying down on a table top. There are also triangular threading inserts oriented in a vertical plane, and these are often called "standup".
    Do they need special holders?
    Yes, you do. You cannot use holders for originary triangular inserts, because they will not hold the cutting corner of the insert at the correct compound angle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Houndogforever View Post
    You can get both topping inserts or partial profile inserts in laydown or in top notch.
    Or even the old standup triangle.
    So which better for cost, performance and strength?
    And who started this tool? Carmex only came about in 1988.
    Why did it become so popular so fast? What is so different about it from a standup triangle?
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    And who started this tool? Carmex only came about in 1988.
    Don't know, but I was using Sandvik laydowns in the late seventies ...

    Why did it become so popular so fast?
    Because they work ?

    What is so different about it from a standup triangle?
    Standup triangles used to put pressure on the cutting edge that wasn't being used in the holder. When you lost one corner you frequently lost a corner in the holder as well. The laydown style holds the insert better.

    Topnotch probably works well also but you only get two corners per insert instead of three.

    Standup triangles are kind of sucky.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Or even the old standup triangle.
    So which better for cost, performance and strength?
    And who started this tool? Carmex only came about in 1988.
    Why did it become so popular so fast? What is so different about it from a standup triangle?
    Bob

    I git a feeling that we would like to hear the answers to your [not] questions...


    -----------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Or even the old standup triangle.
    So which better for cost, performance and strength?
    And who started this tool? Carmex only came about in 1988.
    Why did it become so popular so fast? What is so different about it from a standup triangle?
    Bob
    On the chance that you're serious about this, the laydown is much better than the standard style.
    Especially the full profile inserts. Cost is more obviously but the quality of the cut thread is worth it.
    "The Vardex indexable laydown thread turning insert technology was developed over 50 years ago"

    https://www.vargus.com/thread-turning

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mtndew View Post
    On the chance that you're serious about this, the laydown is much better than the standard style.
    Especially the full profile inserts. Cost is more obviously but the quality of the cut thread is worth it.
    "The Vardex indexable laydown thread turning insert technology was developed over 50 years ago"

    https://www.vargus.com/thread-turning

    Agree 100% . I have never tried to use them on a manual machine, but they totally kick ass in a production environment.

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    The other unusual thing about them (at least the sandvik ones) is since they are flat across the top, you can plunge straight in rather than at a 30* angle. Tool salesman recommended that to me, ah said, "You'se da boss, learned all these hotsy-totsy new tool tricks from the factory" and tried it ... worked good. Strange chip but nice threads. More even wear on the insert, more parts per corner. At $10 apiece that was a good thing.

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    Thank you for actually answering my question. I do appreciate it.



    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    Triangular threading inserts, with one cutting position per corner.
    Because the triangle is oriented in a horizontal plane, as if it were lying down on a table top. There are also triangular threading inserts oriented in a vertical plane, and these are often called "standup".
    Yes, you do. You cannot use holders for originary triangular inserts, because they will not hold the cutting corner of the insert at the correct compound angle.

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    From my research, $10 each sounds dead cheap. Are the $10 ones any good? No immediate need, just asking.



    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    The other unusual thing about them (at least the sandvik ones) is since they are flat across the top, you can plunge straight in rather than at a 30* angle. Tool salesman recommended that to me, ah said, "You'se da boss, learned all these hotsy-totsy new tool tricks from the factory" and tried it ... worked good. Strange chip but nice threads. More even wear on the insert, more parts per corner. At $10 apiece that was a good thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    From my research, $10 each sounds dead cheap. Are the $10 ones any good? No immediate need, just asking.
    I think he is referring back to when he was using them first. . . in the seventies.

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