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  1. #1
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    Default Your favorite turning insert

    I used to run Seco's TP2501 grade in CNMG432 turning low-alloy steel, recently switched to Ingersoll's TT8125 grade with similar tool life at just over half the price. Is there someone else I should be trying? What is your go-to brand/grade for steels?

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    Been using sangvik cnmg and vbmt but trying out the garant inserts slowly.

    Sendt fra min EML-L29 med Tapatalk

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    Whoever has what I need, when I need it. Turning insert could cover the light side of the Moon. I'm not going to sift through all Billion of them to find the cheapest one. I just don't have the extra time.

    R

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    I used to mainly use Iscar but the past few years have been trying out others because of how high their prices have gone. So Mitsubishi make some great stuff, particularly their threading inserts, Seco have some good stuff but Walter are top notch on their Titex range of ISO inserts. Not cheap but kick butt. Sandvik I have used but they are also pretty pricey over here.

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    Iscar WNMG 432 TF in 9250 for just about everything except heavy roughing, WNMX in 9250 for when the WNMG insert breaks.

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    Seems like whenever I find a grade I really like, it gets discontinued.

    WNMG and VNMG most used for me.

    My favorite GP grade is Kennametal KC935, when I can find'em on ebay I grab'em.
    Last edited by jancollc; 07-02-2019 at 06:37 PM.

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    Thought I'd give an update of my adventures.

    I just got done doing some A-36 with a laser cut hole in the center.
    (Nasty slag and heat-affected zone.)
    Insert was a TPMT 32.51 on a 1" boring bar with
    Seco's TP1501 grade, got 10 parts per edge.
    I got some Ingersoll inserts in this morning
    (TT8115, equivalent grade to Seco).
    They got 19 parts on an edge before biting the dust.
    Oh, and Ingersoll was $9.00 instead of $13.00!


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    I grab sumitomo usually as first pick, Mitsubishi as second. The new grades from both of those companies have been fantastic in steel/SS/and super alloy and titanium.

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    i have not seen this insert for a while since i did my trade and don't recall its name but i can describe it.

    It had a negative tilt to the job but a positive angle to going down to the right and it was a square shape insert with a centre pin holding it in place.

    The thing was awesome for roughing, the feeds and depth it could handle where enough to max out the machine motor on the lathe (10 hp ) and the chips where ripping off in small short curls. It stripped material like it was butter.

    Haven't seen it recently and don't know what happened to the manufacturer but am keeping a eye out for it.

    seen similar designs in Milling cutters just the odd one.

    Pitty its not around, the standard neg rake tool doesn't compare.

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    For turning I tend to go either Sandvik or Kennametal. Lately Sandvik.

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    I've never understood why people go with CNMG over WNMG unless they are using the 100 degrees sides for heavy roughing. Only reason I even own any CNMG holders and bars is cause I ended up with a bunch of ceramic and CBN CNMG inserts.

    Am I missing something?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    I've never understood why people go with CNMG over WNMG unless they are using the 100 degrees sides for heavy roughing. Only reason I even own any CNMG holders and bars is cause I ended up with a bunch of ceramic and CBN CNMG inserts.

    Am I missing something?
    Right! I think most tool salesmen just push cnmg and vnmg. Maybe their margins are better on cnmg inserts??

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by as9100d View Post
    Right! I think most tool salesmen just push cnmg and vnmg. Maybe their margins are better on cnmg inserts??

    Sent from my Pixel 3 using Tapatalk
    Maybe not the margins in the insert itself but with 4 vs 6 edges they will sell more.

    I will say the 100 degree edge is fantastic for heavy roughing on a manual, especially if there is nasty scale. But I and most people could get all the used CNMG inserts they want with virgin 100 degree edges for free.

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    If you liked Seco’s Duratomic grades you’ll love this in steels. It’s got a huge sweet spot at less than $4.00 each:

    ZCC CNMG432-PM YBC252

    1b4c953f-f0b3-4b7e-86aa-2a9cdd64b444.jpg

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    Pretty good selection here:


    CARBIDE360.COM LATHE INSERTS

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    Default Your favorite turning insert

    Depending on how the pocket in the toolholder is made, WNMG’s can be slightly less reliable in the pocket than a CNMG.

    Better-quality WNMG holders have part of an additional wall to capture the trailing outer edge of the insert, helping to maintain security during cutting.

    No such issues with a CNMG tool holder...

    ToolCat

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    CNMG vs. WNMG debates can make Ford/Chevy ones look tame......
    I would go with WNMG but we don't do enough production to justify changing out the inventory. Someday, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by exkenna View Post
    Pretty good selection here:


    CARBIDE360.COM LATHE INSERTS
    I’m curious do think the Zhuzhou brand inserts hold up against the big names?

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  22. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardplates View Post
    I've never understood why people go with CNMG over WNMG unless they are using the 100 degrees sides for heavy roughing. Only reason I even own any CNMG holders and bars is cause I ended up with a bunch of ceramic and CBN CNMG inserts.

    Am I missing something?
    We get a lot of use out of our 100 degree holders here for roughing. Mitsubishi inserts treat us well for the most pat.

    For our really heavy roughing we use Iscar's COMG646 in a 100 degree holder. Nothing like taking off about 7/8" off of a diameter per pass. Though they don't like heavy forging scale so you have to be more gentle until you get through it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shop Supply Guru View Post
    I’m curious do think the Zhuzhou brand inserts hold up against the big names?
    I've been surprised with the performance. Like any other line, they have 2-3 home-run hitters and the rest are just average.

    YBC252 is rock solid in all carbon steels with a perfect balance of toughness vs. wear resistance. It's stable up to 1100 sfm in low carbon and does not chip easily. I would say it's almost a carbon copy of Seco's TP2500

    The YBG202/YBG205 twins are my mainstays in Stainless and will handle most Hi-temp alloys with the correct chipbreaker. They remind me of IC907

    YBG105 for Inco and other nickel or chrome based alloys. Very similar in performance to KC5010.

    I would like to have a quality domestic brand or a Mits but I'm a one-man show and the big names won't even talk to me. Gotta take what I can get.


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