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  1. #21
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    I looked what we had in TR hread insert at work

    We had this TR 4 insert . to big unfortanly . With the holder about
    21.5mm and the hole is 20mm

    I may be able to braze the insert on a carbide bar that I made flat in one end

    But I guess I had to grind away the coating on the insert before brazing ?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails tr-platta.jpg  

  2. #22
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    Seems to me it is for OD thread

    Peter

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  4. #23
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    Here find a video with a similar condition wore-out nut and a decent (almost) build another nut.
    The thread cutting boring bar is a great idea but the Op could have made it with a set screw at the end to hold the bit and so be able to grind the angles on his surface grinder, or at least better by being separate from the boring bar shank to make creating a bit easier…and with not brazing or silver soldering it in so not heating up the bit. A flat in the bit side would keep it square...and allow using other shape bits.
    One can use the lead screw for a thread bit gauge to get the angles right.
    Because it is a weight suspended application the thread fit need not be perfect..and likely the screw has a little wear so a perfect fit would be tight at ends, likely .005 loose would be best…and so only the GO-side need be perfect/close.

    *The big if is -> can you find the same thread pitch on your lathe. If so it is an easy fun task to make the new nut.

    Oh, the chatter may be from a neutral side cutting edge rake angle, a scalp top face would provide side cutting edge rake to two sides...and a positive front angle could be employed( 5* both), still, a little chatter would not hurt the function.

    The lead screw would be used as a thread gauge to test the nut..and it made a little loose (.005)...You might turn a -.005 screw to be USD as a sneek-up to size gauge.

    Yes, mount a stop bar device so as to know how deep to bore/thread. Powe-feed back out save making an error, if you have a tight lathe.

    * Well with watching.
    CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE: Single Point ACME Threading! - YouTube

  5. #24
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    I talk to a friend at SECO . It is a insert for internal thread . And they dont have anything smaller in TR 4


    Yes I have 4mm pitch on my lathe .
    Its a European lathe so metric threads is no problem

  6. #25
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    Easy as pie to make your own bit..that is a talent a lathe guy needs to know. USA and German Teenagers learn that in a few days.

    There are so many times a catalog bit won't be found so you can't be handicapped that way.

    In your case only the weighted side matters..The GO Side.

    Yes, the bit needs to be (fingernail) sharp so a little honing is good.

    Eyeball with using the screw for a gauge..and if you have old eyes use a loop to make the go side near correct..It doesn't have to be perfect.

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  8. #26
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    Some basic things to know here regarding bushing bronze...
    The usual material in common use is SAE 660 ...Or C93200 (they are the same stuff)

    This is a continuous cast material available with a cored hole in the center....At any rate it needs some precautions when making accurate parts.

    First off rough the OD of the part leave .030" or so for finish....
    Drill and finish bore the ID to the correct minor diameter for your thread, as i indicated earlier counter bore a small step at the lead end that is at the finished OD (plus clearance) of the thread.
    This will give a visual indication as to where you are on depth with your tool.

    Cur the thread until its at depth. If it was me I would grind my tool slightly thinner than width of the thread groove...
    Once i was at full depth , i would use the compound to "scrape both the lead and trail sides of the thread to make it to width...(test fit with your thread.

    Now finish the OD of the nut....The reason is that this material will change shape during the ID machining process and the outside will change in shape and concentrically.
    OD machining generates far less stress in the part than the ID will, so finishing the OD after the ID is done is how you get a straight, round part.
    Note this process is the way you need to finish bronze bushings as well...all for the same reasons.

    Be sure to grind enough relief on the lead side of the tool ..You can calculate the helix angle of your thread pitch and the part diameter (minor diameter) and base the clearance on that....

    Cheers Ross

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  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    Some basic things to know here ...
    <SNIP>
    OD machining generates far less stress in the part than the ID will, so finishing the OD after the ID is done is how you get a straight, round part.
    Ross, I didn't know that, seems like a very useful fact. Is this true for all standard materials?? Cheers, Bruce

  11. #28
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    Great information, thanks Ross!

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    I get both ID and OD within 0.5 to 1mm first Then do the finisch
    Id or OD first did not seem to matter for me
    With bushings or bearings I often found the bore where it goes into were out of round

    BTW Nothing is round and straight Almost perhaps

    Peter

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    Peter:
    Your results may vary....Some guys are lucky that way, i sadly am not.
    Just passing along what i have learned through hard experience....
    Cheers Ross

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    Qt Peter: [BTW Nothing is round and straight Almost perhaps.]
    I occasionally got a part to "No detectable error" by accident, but I would walk away letting the inspector think I did that on purpose.
    Cheers Buck

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  17. #32
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    I have made a new nut
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails nut.jpg  

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    And I bet with you being a Swiss guy it is darn near perfect.
    looks good from here.

    Still having all the tooling you might make a few more of the same. A popular grinder so some PM guys might be one for backup. I bet the new part from the manufacturer would be about 3 or 4x your shop rate.

    RE:[ but I would walk away letting the inspector think I did that on purpose.]

    One of the inspectors gave me a lab-grade set of JoBlocks so making good was a given. The other inspectors could ney believe I could get so close but with those JoBlocks close was easy as pie. Yes, not turning but for grinding work.

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  21. #34
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    I made a spare so I can shange in future .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johan.A View Post
    I made a spare so I can shange in future .
    likely you will not need to shange in one lifetime.

    Do check your cross and if near a half-turn free play, the good to make new thee also.

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    Hopefully it last my lifetime .

    I have central lubrication on this machine .
    Maybe the nut havent got properly with oil ?

    I will check that .

    And then was the sheet metal guard on the vertical gone
    so chips and dirt could come in on screw and nut

    Previus owner dident care much . I will take better care

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    I like to add a shied plate to go behind my chuck to clear the spindle with a part of perhaps 2" tall on the chuck.
    I also like to put a strip of masking tape at the parting line behind the long feed table and the rest of the machine if possible so to protect grits going into that open space. A small percentage of grits like to bounce off the column and go to that area. Masking Tape with a bit of machine paint cant be seen and holds up for a very long time, is easy to replace or remove with not harming the machine.

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  28. #38
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    Hi and thanks to all of you, for cinde help . As always !!!

    Im screwing the machine together again and the vertical feels great

    I can tell that the screw is very hard. I tried with a new fine cut file
    and it just slided like on glass . Thats great . They will last long and its enough to make new nuts .

    I remenber the Deckel screw wasnt that hard .
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails klar.jpg  

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    Oh, and all precision spindles should have a jog-start of about half speed once or twice at a cold start, with letting slow to near stop before running full speed. This will/may make a spindle last twice as long. It is really best to give a hand spin and then the jog-starts but few grinder hands want to take that much effort/time.

    Wheels should be marked for "up" position with gravity pulling it downward on the mount, this is to ensure the least amount of redress at changing the wheel.

    I also set my mounts to a line-up mark if using those mounts on the same grinder, as in a shop that has only one grinder. True the most surface grinder may have only .0001-.0002 spindle nose taper run-out but for a grinding wheel that can make a lot of wheel front face run out, perhaps .0006 at the wheel front face.

    Wheels are best set on a wooden wall peg, with having a (see-through) dust cover, this so easy to locate and little/less chance of being dropped. Blotters should be ink pen marked with grit size and hardness so to be found if original markings fade.

    Coolant run wheels should dry spin for 5 seconds (+) or so with coolant turned off to ring out coolant.

    For wheel front-face grinding one should carefully by hand bring the parked wheel to feel/rub the part and note that dial number, to be able to come to that part with not having a hard crash contact. I would tell an apprentice to use only a 3/4 wide wheel for this dangerous task. A dished wheel can be safer but high pressure and wheel loading are common with front-wheel face use. Yes, many grinding books recommend to never grind with the front face.

    ...and an air hose should not be allowed near a grinder as grinders are designed to shed falling grits but are not suited grits drive by an air hose.

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  31. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johan.A View Post
    I have made a new nut
    Well done, that's what lathes are for!

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