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    Not much progress to report, family obligations have limited my time in the shop. Just got home and I stopped by a friend and got to borrow his scrapers, and two flat reference surfaces. The big one is in the wooden box. One is ground for soft steel and the other for cast iron. He is a good welder and I showed him the gib and he said he would definitely weld that if it was his call.



    I am not sure how useful the longer ruler will be, I don't plan to scrape any ways flat, and it is not a camel back type nor a dove tail so it cannot get into where it needs to go and retain stiffness. But I got to borrow it, just in case.

    Oh I need some blue marking ink. I would have liked canode based on what I heard but cannot find it. Dykem Hi-spot I have found on ebay cheaply from the UK, and then there is the Diamant stuff from germany, I know less about this but the company are the moglice people apparently so they should know their stuff. More expensive than the dykem.

    Also forgot, got the inching wheel from Franz Singer last night too so that is taken care of as well.

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    I have all 3 of those marking inks and prefer Dykem over Diamant, Dykem is darker at the same thickness, which makes much easier to see the contact spots, did couple tests with Canode, it seemed to print as well as the Dykem, but it also seemed to get dry quite fast, since much more experienced people like it a lot, I guess it was me at fault, working too slow

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    Dykem really seems to be loved by everyone, if not for the smurf issue. I am leaning towards it though, I am a slow worker.

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    WD40 is the magic solution for the smurf problem, after you spray and wipe, you can use something like acetone or alike to get parts clean, to keep hands clean I use PR88 before starting the work, then wd40 to get majority off of the skin, and a good soap will get everything else

    if you don't use WD40 and try to clean the Dykem off with just acetone, you will run out of acetone, and paper towels, and all the rags will be slightly blue as well, and pretty much everything else in 10m radius where you might have went after touching the Dykem tube

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    Dykem really seems to be loved by everyone, if not for the smurf issue. I am leaning towards it though, I am a slow worker.
    You should be able to get small tins of Stuart's Micrometer as easily. More than one color. But so is Dykem, actually. More to it than just "blue".

    I get mine from Cromwell online, out of the UK:

    Cromwell Tools - Experts in Hand Tools, Power Tools and PPE

    Thicker and stiffer than Dykem's spotting goop.

    You mix a small dab with an oil to use. And GLOVE UP! No rotating machinery is involved, here,

    A box of disposable nitrile or similar gloves make life much easier without having to degenerate to cat piss diluted with Windex and have it chronically drying-up.

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    Yeah I went for the stuarts, but I went with a tube after reading all the negative stuff about the tins on this forum. Quite cheap for the amount. Some other colors might be nice, but everything in due time.

    Today I have mostly put up some christmas lighting, but I have polished out 99.9% of the dings from the handwheel and polished it up so it's ready now. Just feels good to have one thing done and put aside. Got brake cleaner as it really cuts the gunk well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    Yeah I went for the stuarts, but I went with a tube after reading all the negative stuff about the tins on this forum. Quite cheap for the amount. Some other colors might be nice, but everything in due time.

    Today I have mostly put up some christmas lighting, but I have polished out 99.9% of the dings from the handwheel and polished it up so it's ready now. Just feels good to have one thing done and put aside. Got brake cleaner as it really cuts the gunk well.
    The tins are OK. One has to expect a sort of thick "mud", and just take a palette-knife sliver away to cut with oil separately, not in the shipping/storage tin itself.

    Brake-cleaner I use on... brakes. Go figure. I've moved away from most of the high-volatiles. They may "cut" but don't necessarily remove dirt very well.

    My preference for machinery is a non-abrasive hand cleaner, "Goop" a common one, here. Leaves paint as good as whatever it IS, any stripping a compartmentalized exercise for another time rather than an accidental byproduct.

    Scrub it in with a round shoe-polish dauber brush and short-stiff-bristled "chip' bushes. It penetrates and lifts the dirt, you clear it away, still no water, as "mud. and neither your skin nor your lungs - nor even your budget - are abused as badly. Couple of successive goes at it, usually not even any remaining need for the strong caustics - just a wipe-down with the lighter, but still relatively low volatile - spirits or the sort sold for auto-body acrylic paint pre-prep.

    If/as/when water wash IS still needed, a mild dishwashing detergent will often do - still no need of the heavier hammer of caustics.

    Messier "on the machine" by the look of it's oily-mud self at the outset, but less mess and easier to control in the rest of the environment, the whole journey.

    20CW

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    It's nasty stuff so I wear a mask with the proper filters and wear gloves.

    One tip I got from local machinists was "mäntysuopa" or pine soap and water, apparently very good, mostly I associate this with scrubbing down the wooden deck and washing carpets. But it's water and such needs good cleaning to avoid rust.

    Last night I cleaned out most of the gunk and goop in the base of the machine, it was perhaps the dirtiest place of the machine, extremely foul. I might try the pine soap approach on the strainers in the coolant tanks.

    p.s.
    Found a 10 year old tube of Autosol, that stuff is gold for polishing up parts.

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    Most effective cleaner for me have been coolant it self I have tried all kind of cleaners and degreasers etc. With coolant i had best results when cleaned my dirty "new to me" lathe.

    Mäntysuopaa en ole koittanut

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    when my Fehlmann P51 arrived, it had a layer of dried up "stuff" everywhere where coolant might have splashed on to and dried up, X/Y table, servos, cables etc, best way to clean that gunk off - plain old water, the purer the water, the easier it will be to dissolve that dirt, pure water is quite a good solvent, and that dried up gunk is water soluble oil after all (mostly anyway), hence why the coolant, which is usually around 90ish % water anyway, worked so well as a "cleaner"

    tap water contains chlorides (salts), which likes iron quite a lot, but this friendship is quite undesirable is this context hence me suggesting using purified water

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    To repare the gib I would silversolder on a new piece
    Only if you build it up completly by welding it maigt be stronger
    Defenitly stronger then welding on a piece of steel as the surface is much bigger as with welding
    Let it cool in some dry sand and it will be soft if it is hardening steel
    And even cast iron you can silver solder very easy if the surface of the cast iron is ground on a surface grinder A PITA if you do not grind it A breeze if you do

    Peter

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    My idea was to build it up using tig filler material and also fill on a bit extra material on the back for strenght, then file to fit. I don't have silver soldering or brazing equipment unfortunately, only TIG brazing and I don't think that would be good at this job.

    Also don't have any dry sand, perhaps leaving it wrapped in rock wool might work.

    I have continued the clean up the machine, and I started by removing the electrical switch.







    This bolt on solution doesn't much please me, also the wire was put on the outside, in the original the wires went on the inside. The original holes seem to be just fine though, and it seems they might take some modern screw in switch and I could redo the wiring properly.

    It's getting there...


    I also removed the DRO and the scale and cleaned them up. The Y scale does not work either. It might be the lamp. I might be able to get the lamp from the other broken reader head swapped out.


    Does anyone know if this unit is compatible with an LS 703 scale? I have been offered one of these, 720mm total length, for cost of shipping. It is something that has been sitting in someones shop for 20 year, but worked when put away.

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    The switches should not be hard. They do not attach directly to the casting.

    You'll want to cut a nice looking and not TOO damned thick nor thin racetrack shaped blank to match the edges of the boss around those paired holes. That plate can be flush, or have "depth" to it and still match the shape. A gasket is righteous if surfaces are uneven.

    The two central holes, tapped, I presume, will retain that plate.

    Each switch, back body comfortable below the hole size, is then attached by though-hole neck and knurled ring-nut to your plate, not the casting. Hex nut and lockwasher take up the slack, backside of the plate so the visible side is neatly flush.

    Old stuff, Looks "factory" lasts a long time if the switches are worth a damn. "Oiltight" recommended.

    "Contact form" and how wired not my bag as I am not "there", but not hard if I were, so same again for you. Pick what you like from what is available. No one from the Deckel design team is likely to criticize!

    Some form of sleeving recommended for the wires as much to control where they lie as to protect them. Even if sleeved, bad form they should get abraded or their proverbial underwear wrapped around any sort of moving parts.

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    My idea for the buttons after some looking around was to buy ~22mm size ones, a common size and fabricate an threaded adapter sleeve for the current holes.

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    My final 2 bits on the gib repair.....Welding or any high temp application would be my very last choice, its just not necessary and might produce unwanted results!

    Think the steel strap held in place with two flat head screws (Allens) making the full width of the gib and as thick as the original finger that stopped the gib screw.
    Remember that in a properly adjusted gib the force applied here is quite small....we ain't trying to chalk a locomotive from running away ....Original setup has worked for 99% of the folks here
    posting on this board...In fact yours is the only case i have seen where the gib finger was broken....

    Additionally, the repair i suggest is exactly how the later FP-NC's do their gibs...they secure a steel tab to the end of the gib by two screws...the tab overhangs one side of the gib and is drilled through.
    A stud is fit to the casting of the machine that passes through the tab hole. The gib position (adjustment) is secured via shim washers between the casting and the tab....a nut on the stud secures everything....

    Works fine...no problems, and plenty strong enough....



    As to the buttons...Have seen modern PB's applied to the original holes using shim rings...works fine..Original buttons are less than great. Can be problematic to make or break the circuit owing to a rather crude and
    primitive contact setup.....My FP2 still has the original buttons, but they do not always work on first push...

    Cheers Ross

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    I quite liked these buttons! Metal with a LED circle (in red and green for this application). This store is nearby me:

    Starelec Oy

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    My idea for the buttons after some looking around was to buy ~22mm size ones, a common size and fabricate an threaded adapter sleeve for the current holes.
    Bushings and washers "per-each hole" - see Ross's note- can certainly work but.. covering the space in between in the same go with a "racetrack" shaped plate might give a cleaner overall look and be easier to KEEP clean anyway.

    It's very probably easier to fab as well.

    Your machine, your call, and no big deal. Anything you do there can be changed again, later if you find reason to do so.

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    I'm giving both options consideration, making a single plate would cover those holes at least. I was thinking if I could re-use the plate made by the earlier owners. It has some other holes in it already that might get in the way though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    I quite liked these buttons! Metal with a LED circle (in red and green for this application). This store is nearby me:

    Starelec Oy
    They probably HAVE these features, but with only ten percent of the life-cycle expectancy we like to see in serious Telco gear neither of my two "must have" for mechanical switch contacts is spoken of:

    - "Wiping" action. This clears contaminents and even minor corrosion each and every actuation

    - "Bifurcated" contact points which improves independent flexure, reduces risk of hang-ups and failure without need of overly high contact force that could shorten life or interfere with effective and enduring "wiping".

    Nokia Oy was never Finland's only electronics venture, so local or import, I'm sure they will "DO". The IP65 at least is a comforting plus.

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    Original style 2 button plate is a simple oval that mimics the casting intersection to the button mount flat....
    Is light sheet metal with a raised bead around the perimeter .

    To get access to the back side where the buttons are mounted and wired...you have to remove the cast side panel....
    This will require removal of the feed and speed gear box gear selector dials ( 4 taper pins..usually difficult to remove)
    Will also need to remove the "Y" axis feed hand wheel and shaft along with the power feed lever and the rapid feed and coolant clutch knob.....

    Think it is easier to also remove the "Y" slide gauge block and slide lock assembly as well....

    To get the panel off need to remove the Allen bolts that are also the stop points for the feed and speed gear change cranks....Where the spring plungers engage.
    There are additional retaining bolts through from the inside as well....Located behind the sheet metal panel that holds the lube guns (Inside the door on the non operators side) there are an additional 2 Allens

    Cheers Ross

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