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  1. #301
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    Most commen problem I encountered that needs disassembling the whole saddle is a broken tapered pin in the clutch for the Z -axe
    That happens if a wrong shearpin is installed
    you could check manualy by rotating the jog wheel at the back Engaging the Z-axe powerfeed and trying to hold the z-handwheel stationary in both up and down
    If you can hold it the tapered pin snapped

    peter

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  3. #302
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    Dennis, as you know my earlier advice was to follow the most direct path to get the machine working. That would argue for fixing or replacing the gib, putting it all back together, and using it.

    On the other hand, since the machine has had grease pumped into the support, it might make sense to lift off the support, clean out the grease, and have a look at the various parts inside. I think Thanos and his friend were able to do a comparable job (remove support, exchange internal parts) in a single day. Probably an experienced professional like Peter could also do this in one day. So if you can work on it for several hours a day and all weekend, you can probably get it finished in a couple of weeks. It might make sense to do that now.

    I personally did not want to use my machine at all when there was no lubricating oil reaching the X or Z ways.

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    Yes it has crossed my mind, or at least get the Z-gib out and clean the oil channels, they might be caked over with dried up grease. I have used compressed air to blow oil and solvent through the channels so far, not sure what it really looks like on the inside though.

    I don't know when I will have the equipment required to remove the table so I am continuing with the drudge work right now. That is, cleaning chips out of the nooks and crannies I can get to.

    Removed the rear motor grille last night and oh my the inside so full of chips and grease, the chips are stuck in place. I have soaked it in solvent overnight but will probably need a scraper or something.

  5. #304
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    If you have been using compressed air in and around the lube system...the die is cast...You now definitely need to disassemble and clean everything!!!!!.

    Seems this part of the discussion is over!
    Cheers Ross

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    Could you explain why that is? Risk of junk getting in there, or popping something loose? Or something else?

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    If you have been using compressed air in and around the lube system...the die is cast...You now definitely need to disassemble and clean everything!
    Ross, are you concerned that this may have forced the grease deeper into the system, blocking more lubrication passages?

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    I would say that the possibility of dirt, of impacting grease is possible.....
    Impacting feed wicks...pushing dirt out into the sliding surfaces.....sort of a crap shoot

    My point is if things are to the point that CA is needed to open feed lines,then likely you need a different kind of cleaning......

    Compressed air is the last thing one should be using on a machine tool. Not an issue if its all coming apart.
    Cheers Ross

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    I used compressed air to try and clean my lube system on the Abene VHF3. What little flow I had through the system then became zero. I believe what happened is it forced the dirt into the Bijur metering nozzle filters and plugged them. I then took everything apart and cleaned it. New (well sort of new) nozzles and after that it worked very good. Just FYI, not specifically related.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    Could you explain why that is? Risk of junk getting in there, or popping something loose? Or something else?
    Not "risk of" atall.

    If it ain't already flowing free? Dead CERTAINTY-OF ..impacting the crud into solid plugs of gunk and metal fines as make Barr's leaks look a mere leaky band-aid!

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    I would say that the possibility of dirt, of impacting grease is possible.....
    Impacting feed wicks...pushing dirt out into the sliding surfaces.....sort of a crap shoot

    My point is if things are to the point that CA is needed to open feed lines,then likely you need a different kind of cleaning......

    Compressed air is the last thing one should be using on a machine tool. Not an issue if its all coming apart.
    Cheers Ross
    I've used it on the two nipples on the side of the X-table, I believe one feeds oil to the X-screw and sliding surfaces for the X-table, the other feeds oil to the Z-axis sliding surfaces. I got free flowing air pretty fast when I blew them out anyway and out of the black looking oil glass, but I guess who knows what crud is in there.

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    Singer has inexpensive replacement 20mm oil eyes, you should probably order a couple of these.
    Olschauglas, Olauge D2 z.B. fur Deckel Frasmaschine | eBay

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    I was wondering how the oil sight glasses were replaced, based on your threads images, removal looked destructive.

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    That's why you need replacement glasses........
    Not expensive and best solution....Cleaning the originals is generally not very rewarding.
    Cheers Ross

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    I was wondering how the oil sight glasses were replaced, based on your threads images, removal looked destructive.
    On my 1964 machine the oil sight glasses were exactly that: glass. And yes, the way I removed them was destructive: I broke them out. With sufficient effort it may be possible to remove these glass originals, to clean them, and to re-use them, but I don't see the point. The plastic replacements are inexpensive, look nice, and work well. Some additional information about replacement parts available from Elesa and Kipp is given in this thread and in this thread.

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    Yes I just thought it was a shame to break them anyway...

    I am not getting anything done recently due to being sick... I figure I should ask before I do anything, but glass bead blasting, OK on machine parts? I assume you want it away from any precision surfaces. But I have a small blasting cabinet and glass media I was thinking I'd bring home to clean and freshen up some parts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    Yes I just thought it was a shame to break them anyway...

    I am not getting anything done recently due to being sick... I figure I should ask before I do anything, but glass bead blasting, OK on machine parts? I assume you want it away from any precision surfaces. But I have a small blasting cabinet and glass media I was thinking I'd bring home to clean and freshen up some parts.
    "Soda" blasting, usually harmless. Artificial Plastic + rouge media or genuine Walnut shells, much the same.

    Glass beads - or anything even more abrasive or capable of generating abrasive debris byproducts, such as sharp sand?

    Just what is it that needs that heavier-hammer badly enough to take the greater risk of direct or collateral damage? "Speed" mayhap?

    "Fast" is the natural enemy of "safe" or "good".

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    Yes I just thought it was a shame to break them anyway...
    Like others I had to break them out too ... I bought some replacements from Franz but they can also be bought from Elesa Their part number is 11701

    HTH

    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    "Soda" blasting, usually harmless. Artificial Plastic + rouge media or genuine Walnut shells, much the same.

    Glass beads - or anything even more abrasive or capable of generating abrasive debris byproducts, such as sharp sand?

    Just what is it that needs that heavier-hammer badly enough to take the greater risk of direct or collateral damage? "Speed" mayhap?

    "Fast" is the natural enemy of "safe" or "good".
    It's simply what I got already. In my book glass bead blasting was one of the slower methods and not really what I considered to be a heavy hammer, used to use it for blasting and prepping items for hot caustic bluing or phosphating.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    It's simply what I got already. In my book glass bead blasting was one of the slower methods and not really what I considered to be a heavy hammer, used to use it for blasting and prepping items for hot caustic bluing or phosphating.
    Once you have the air and the equipment- not "100%" interchangeable, mind - but still - it doesn't take a lot more gear to be able to set up for several alternatives as to media.

    Plastic Blasting Media vs. Natural Blasting Media

    Plenty more info out there.

    I use very little, so have one size-each of soda, walnut, "a" plastic, glass, and sand, but not, so far, steel shot, coal slag, apricot pit, nor corncob!


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    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey John View Post
    Like others I had to break them out too ... I bought some replacements from Franz but they can also be bought from Elesa Their part number is 11701
    John, I think that's wrong, the part you refer to is the HE.30. The correct Elesa part is the HE.20, part number 11501.


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