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  1. #1001
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    Well at least the issue with the loud clonking noise and the feeds is resolved, turns out this was the problem. I left them too proud of the shaft. I wanted to keep it sticking out a bit so I can more easily spot the large side. I have got issues with being able to visually spot which is larger sometimes when they are flush. Made a gouge in the aluminum cover on the inside, but fortunately nothing more than cosmetic damage.


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  3. #1002
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    Well at least the issue with the loud clonking noise and the feeds is resolved, turns out this was the problem.
    Glad that for once it was something simple. I hope that your run of bad luck is finally behind you!

  4. #1003
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    Fit your taper pins to length, just flush or barley proud of the part on both sides....I have a little procedure to do this.
    I ream the hole. Then install the pin, and push it home by hand, and very lightly tap (with small hammer) the pin a bit deeper into the hole..
    Then i use a very fine "prick" punch to mark the intersection of the part surface at the pin on both sides.
    Then remove the pin.
    Cut the pin with a hacksaw (Grip the wast ends in the vise) Cut slightly longer than the big end punch mark, and just short (toward the big end) of the punch mark at the small end.

    Then i hold the pin in the chuck of a cordless drill (yes i know the pin is tapered, but the chuck will hold it fine...just hand tight here, no chuck key)
    Then i finish the ends on the belt sander forming the slight curve on the ends by moving the drill while the pin is rotating...
    Finish both ends of the pin and install....a little practice and you can get the fit pretty well, and the ends will look factory.

    If you want to define the small end, then when finishing the ends of the pins, finish the small end flat, not arced....that will identify the small end and make it easier to get a drift punch to
    stay on the end when removing....or use a dob from a paint marker to mark the desired end.

    Cheers Ross

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  6. #1004
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    I'm not too concerned with them looking factory, just as long as it clears. I think it looks fine to have two "nubs" sticking out on each end. I do shorten them and round both sides over for looks. When I can look at the two ends sticking out a little I can easily tell which is which.

    Last night I got my shim washers. I turned the thrust plate on the lathe so the 35x45 washers fit and I added one plus one of the original .5mm washer for a total thickness of .7mm and I got a really good and wide pattern that was centered on the gears on both sides. Unfortunately I did not have my phone with me so I didn't take a picture of it. I am not sure if I could improve it further by adding another .2mm washer since it looks pretty darn good as is.

    I kind of want to move on with measuring the play now. I am thinking maybe I can use some wedges behind the pinion gear to lock it in place and then test the play. Then I will need to disassemble the vertical head and lube the bearings with NBU-15 grease.

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  8. #1005
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    I would never check any gear mesh pattern or bearing preload/clearance unless all bolts and retaining nuts were in place and torqued....things move even if you can't feel or see it!
    This is a lesson I learned through hard experience.
    Cheers Ross

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  10. #1006
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    I'll run another pattern test then with the nut back on, it's actually back on now.

    But now I have taken apart the thrust and needle bearing setup to clean and regrease it.

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    As to setting the gear backlash or clearance....just need to know that you have some.....some small strips of modeling clay (plasticene)
    rolled between your fingers to make thin rolls, and placed across the teeth, and then assemble, roll through and disassemble to inspect...Clay should be smashed thin, almost see through..that should be fine for
    clearance so long as you have verified that there are no spots that have interference (zero clearance) when the gears are rotated. (you will feel it if there is no clearance).....
    Clay smashed but leaving a thick berm means the clearance is too great.
    Clay needs to be fresh,and the room/clay/gears need to be warm...(winter, unheated shop is too cold a for meaningful check)

    Cheers Ross

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    I keep it to 10C in my shop in wintertime, it's a bit cold. I've considered that commercial stuff mentioned earlier, plastigauge, seems it would give me a reading I could measure.

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    Hey a pretty late update but the machine is basically ready, been for a while but I have been busy with other things. I am just installing the one shot lubrication system, it took a while to get a hold of all the fittings and then some didn't fit and I had to order again... and I made some on the lathe too because I got tired of waiting. Anyway it's almost installed. Need to figure out how to pull the line for the 3rd oil nipple that's on the operator side.



    Perhaps like this, I believe it can be made to clear if I can attach it somehow. Guess more holes have to be drilled, which I am not thrilled about.



    BTW even after five pumps and holding the thumb over the air hole on the sight glass, there's no oil in the sight glass on the Z-axis on the operator side. Does it just take time for it to reach there?

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    Dear Dennis,

    Congratulations on getting your machine working at last. With all of the problems you have come across, I think most people would have given up.

    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    Need to figure out how to pull the line for the 3rd oil nipple that's on the operator side.
    I didn't bother with that one. But one guy (John) ran a copper tube around the lower bushing for the Z-axis lead screw. Here's a link to a photo:

    FP2 vertical table and support tear-down and reassembly

    and another one

    FP2 vertical table and support tear-down and reassembly

    I think there are additional photos in that thread also.

    BTW even after five pumps and holding the thumb over the air hole on the sight glass, there's no oil in the sight glass on the Z-axis on the operator side.
    I think your machine is the same as mine, with two oil lubrication points on the door side of the support. One of those lubrication points is for behind the X-axis lead-screw nut. This sight glass has an air hole. It's the OTHER lubrication point (no sight glass on the door side) which leads to the operator side of the support and the sight glass on the operator side.

    Cheers,
    Bruce

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    Hey Bruce and thanks for the compliments. I did check out that thread because I remembered I saw that done by JDP993. But I feel that is something I should have done when I had the saddle off the machine, I think it's too late for me to attempt it now. So I am looking at alternate routings. I wonder if there's just some adhesive goo I could use to attach the hose instead of using saddle clamps.

    I held my thumb over the sight glass because the adjustement on the manifold didn't fully stop the oil flow to the other oil point, so I pushed oil into both of the oil points. I left it and will go look at it later today to see if any oil has made it there by now.

    I remember I did this with my oil gun earlier and I did manage to get oil into that part. Then I guess the oil drains away over time and you have to squeeze a lot of inot it again, in order to oil that side. I think it might be a weakness in the design, perhaps a separate oil point for the Z-axis on the operatorside would have been better.

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    Dennis,

    I used 4mm soft copper line to run to the fitting by the handle. It is attached on the vertical surface by the one shot oiler and again where it turns to go over the saddle. It is stiff enough to stay put under the vertical table and I just put a small dip in it to clear the x axis trip lever. I won't be home for a while so I can't take any pictures. I used a straight coupling and a short piece of clear tubing right before it connect to the oil port to act as a sort of sight glass. Just a note of caution this fitting at least on mine takes significantly more pressure to oil than the other 2.

    My system I put small valves on each line. This way I close 2 and apply oil to each port individually. Unfortunately these are pneumatic valves so they leak back a bit when closed but it doesn't make a huge mess and I just try to work quickly.

    For the operator sight glass the manual states that it will not fill up, it is just there to be sure oil is flowing. The manual has a lube amount and I just do enough pumps to equal that. I think it is somewhere between 2 and 3. The door side takes about 3/4 of a pump to fill the glass and I do about a 1/2 for the operator handle fitting.

    Shawn

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    I wonder if there's just some adhesive goo I could use to attach the hose instead of using saddle clamps.
    I would make up some small plastic or steel or aluminium "clamp/clip blocks" and epoxy those in place. Then use those blocks to retain the hose.

    I guess the oil drains away over time and you have to squeeze a lot of inot it again, in order to oil that side. I think it might be a weakness in the design.
    My oil pump provides 8cc (ml) each time it is pumped. I did some experimentation when I first installed it. I have needle valves on both outlets, and typically close one valve and open the other before pumping. Typically I do 3-5 pumps (24 - 40cc of oil) to the upper oil point which goes across the support to the operator side. I don't do this every time that I use the machine but certainly once every 5 or 10 hours of use. I have to refill the reservoir (500cc) about once a year.

    PS: I use 220 weight bedway oil.

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    Why not make a nice-looking aluminum holder with a strong magnet?

    I did that to mount the reading head of my x-axis geass scale.

    As I did not want ANY holes in my nice machine...

    Cheers
    Erik

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    I used some cable channels or guides, not sure what they are called. Adhesive on the back and it seems to be sticking pretty well. So all three ports are now working. I also fiddled with the manifold and now all the on off valves work and I was able to pump to just the one until I got oil in the sight glass on the operators side.

    Once I assemble the x-axis DRO it will be hidden behind it.

    Last night after replacing the oil in the bottom reservoir I took the first test cuts on the machine.

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    Hi Dennis,

    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    Last night after replacing the oil in the bottom reservoir I took the first test cuts on the machine.
    Congratulations! This odyssey began in October 2018, so by my reckoning it has taken you about 16 months to get the machine going. You've shown a lot of discipline and perseverance, and I'm happy that you've finally reached this point. Please post some photos of your first cuts. I wish you many happy years of finally using your FP2 rather than fixing it!

    Cheers,
    Bruce

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  22. #1017
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    Yeah it took a long time, but there where some pauses in between, lots of waiting and researching.

    First test cut. Very light passes since I don't trust the setup to hold. I disassembled it soon afterwards to properly dial in the table to the axis of the spindle. My first project will probably be real T-nuts and holddowns for the vise.




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    Thanks, it looks great!

    For very little money you can buy some high-quality T-nuts (extra long, hardened and tempered). For example:
    OREX T-Nutensteine DIN 508 M6-M22 Muttern fur T-Nuten T-Nutenstein | eBay
    I recommend M10 x 12mm lang.
    OREX 6 Muttern fur T-Nuten lang,M10 fur 12mm T-Nute,T-Nutenstein,Spannpratzen | eBay

    Frankly I think it makes sense to do that, and spend your time making things that you can't buy off the shelf.

  25. #1019
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    I ordered some of those yeah, making the clamps for the vise currently, been milling some stock to preliminary size. I am detecting some vibration when I am running it, I am not sure if it's normal, or if it means I have something loose. I have tightened up every point on the work table.

    Then I adjusted the gibs on all axises. But I am not sure how much resistance I ought to aim for... Some of what I have read says to adjust until you can't rotate the handle, then let up a bit and leave it like that. That still makes for a table that is difficult to turn by hand, certainly wouldn't want to hand feed it! I dunno, should the resistance be that much?

    I adjusted the Z-axis when it was near the bottom and it felt heavy to move but once it got further up it was much easier to rotate.

  26. #1020
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    I adjusted the Z-axis when it was near the bottom and it felt heavy to move but once it got further up it was much easier to rotate.
    Wear !
    Cheers Ross


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