Deckel FP2 how to free frozen horizontal quill? - Page 8
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  1. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by jariou View Post
    ...

    He works on a horizontal boring mill I believe (real machinists can correct me if I'm wrong), so he has quite a lot of real estate but I see his work as perfect tutorials on how to tool up and use a horizontal machine.
    ...
    Hi there Jacques,

    I always enjoy this guy's videos, he's a HBM fanatic, refuses to even go to the lathe

    However, I think that 90% of the setup time is edited out... makes it seem much easier that it actually is, when you have to find the correct spacer and correct height clamps and hold everything together for indicating...

    BR,
    Thanos

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  3. #142
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    Hey Thanos,

    Sure, I'm not arguing that you can build what he builds in the time it takes to watch the video. I'm merely suggesting that one should look at how he fixtures things on the table and take some hints.

    For example, a lot of the blocks he uses as fences for example are keyed to the table slots. So the alignment is automatic, no waste of time indicating. Of course, it assumes that a lot of care was taken initially to get the blocks keyed properly in the first place.

    Anyway, I acquired an FP1 about a year ago and still have not used the horizontal spindle but I am thinking of perhaps reproducing that project for myself, a bit smaller perhaps, just to get more familiar with how to fixture things for the horizontal spindle. And one has a perfect example to follow. I'm sure that would be a great exercise to discover the power and usefulness of the horizontal.

    Ciao,

    Jacques

  4. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by thanvg View Post
    Hi there Jacques,

    I always enjoy this guy's videos, he's a HBM fanatic, refuses to even go to the lathe
    By the way Thanos, I think you're being a little harsh on him there!

    I have seen him use the lathe!

    Cheers!

  5. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by jariou View Post
    ...
    Anyway, I acquired an FP1 about a year ago and still have not used the horizontal spindle but I am thinking of perhaps reproducing that project for myself, a bit smaller perhaps, just to get more familiar with how to fixture things for the horizontal spindle. And one has a perfect example to follow. I'm sure that would be a great exercise to discover the power and usefulness of the horizontal.

    Ciao,

    Jacques
    Right, this would be really handy. Plus some blocks to raise your parts.


    Quote Originally Posted by jariou View Post
    By the way Thanos, I think you're being a little harsh on him there!

    I have seen him use the lathe!

    Cheers!
    Yes, indeed, I remember that one time he actually went to the lathe

    nice guy, nice projects!

    BR,
    Thanos

  6. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by jariou View Post
    Hi sigurasg, see my my answer below from a Quebecois exiled in Uncle Sam's country!
    My condolences .

    Quote Originally Posted by jariou View Post
    Just go watch any videos on Raymond Menendez' El Metal channel on YouTube. No waste of time with narration platitudes, no vertical spindle, no vise. Just horizontal machining, and fast.
    Yeah, I've seen some of his videos, they're pretty cool. His HBM is pretty big - a walk-in machine.
    I guess I should re-watch his videos with an eye to the setups and tooling he uses.

    Looks like I'll be looking to find or make some setup blocks and miscellaneous clamping hardware.

  7. #146
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    Don't believe there are many "Aa-Ha" moments in this trade. Its all cumulative. Setbacks, failures and small victories..You build on your skills and experience, stretch the scope of what you think you can do....
    You need to strive for a better result with every job...better finish, higher accuracy, faster time to completion.
    The additive effect just sort of builds where one day you are standing in front of a machine with a new project and you just know "I got this"
    It wasn't always that way....

    As to running horizontal...think the work will define when you go that route. Don't think you need to search for ways to use the horizontal over the vertical. The work will tell you. The trick is to be open
    to listening to the work, not being deaf from mono planer thinking.....The "Deckel" arrangement is the perfect instrument to expand your approach.

    I use the horizontal perhaps 1/3 of the time...maybe a bit less. Most is done direct from the spindle...no overarm or support bearing. (don't do that much heavy milling, so generally not much conventional horizontal cutting)
    Lots of long reach boring and extended milling on hard to reach surfaces.
    Surfacing where i want to avoid the droop from weight shift that happens when running vertical.
    Angle plates, vise, and 2-4-6 blocks along with dedicated fixturing for specific work make up the bulk of work holding for running horizontal. One of the mistakes that inexperienced hands make is the reluctance
    to spend the time and effort to make a well thought out fixture to hold a specific project....Time spent here can often make the difference between a good and a poorly executed project.

    Tool and fixture making is one of the real joys of this trade. Gives you a chance to brag in the metal, if only for yourself. Often something that remains long after the job is gone. A reminder of the job, your approach
    and the satisfaction of seeing something completed at your hands....

    Cheers Ross

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  9. #147
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    Thanos, thanks for the all the nice pictures! Here's a couple from me, showing the vise as workholding in horizontal mode. Note the use of parallels to lift up the work from the vise.







    Ross, you wrote

    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    Tool and fixture making is one of the real joys of this trade. Gives you a chance to brag in the metal, if only for yourself. Often something that remains long after the job is gone. A reminder of the job, your approach and the satisfaction of seeing something completed at your hands.
    I am a convert to your way of thinking. There are many cases where if I spend an hour making a fixture or jig, then I can do the work itself perfectly and easily in minutes. And if I mess up, it's in the making if the fixture or jig, not in working on the part itself. Whereas if I try to do the job without the fixture or jig, it takes longer than an hour and has steps which compromise accuracy or carry significant "screw-it-up" risk.

    Cheers,
    Bruce
    Last edited by ballen; 02-14-2020 at 07:29 PM.

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  11. #148
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    Well put Ross, very well put


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