Early Schaublin 13 value? - Page 3
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 52 of 52
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Benicia California USA
    Posts
    8,355
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1950
    Likes (Received)
    2699

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MillersFalls View Post
    I'm also planing on turning down the existing shaft from either 3/8" or 1/2" to the required 9 mm via angle grinder or belt sander on the running motor. Wont be pretty, but it should be concentric, and should hopefully bolt straight in when I'm done modifying it. If it doesn't work i'm out at most about $100 for the motor.
    Cringe............ If the replacement motor has a key way you won't be able to make the shaft run round....the grinder will dig into the key way and make that part of the shaft lower than the rest, making it run off center.

    Would bet there is a small shop in your area that could easily turn the shaft on that motor for very little cash outlay....Would require disassembly, but that's pretty easy work....simpler than rebuilding a mill!
    Quality machines demand quality repairs....

    Cheers Ross

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Mexico
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Yes I know its terrible, but if I can find a 3/8" shaft that's only 9.525 mm, so its only a 0.01" cut. That's a good point about the key way flattening though, perhaps I will fill it with a dummy key first. However the shaft will need to have a flat in it anyway to mate against the key in the existing female mate, I'm not cutting a new key way. The rapid shouldn't get used much, and the load should be low when it is used, so I figure might be good enough?...

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    11,673
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3983
    Likes (Received)
    4150

    Default

    One can clamp a motor to a plate and set the plate on a surface grinder with the long travel locked..shim the plate or motor to indicate flat.. Fire up the motor and down-grind the shaft to size...put a hand made guard of nylon at the motor bearing to be sure no grit can enter there...might add an O ring to the nyoln guard.

    Yes still to worry about the key way...two double (Piggy back) set screws on a shaft flat work well.

    and when you have the motor on the SG would be the time to make the flat....just clamp the shaft and long travel to grind the flat.

    RE: [turning down the existing shaft from either 3/8" or 1/2" to the required 9 mm via angle grinder or belt sander on the running motor.] is a plan to scrap the moror IMHO.

    looks like a very handy mill with a tilt tabel and a tilt head...

    I have the Steinel mill.
    steinle milling machine - Yahoo Image Search Results

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Redwood City, CA USA
    Posts
    5,125
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    204
    Likes (Received)
    1022

    Default

    Can you conjure a way to mount the motor on your mill's table and fix a lathe tool somewhere stationary? Feed the motor along the tool or vice versa using the handwheels. My guess is that you will get a bunch of chatter because the motor bearings are not intended to be lathe spindle bearings, but it ought to work with light cuts and a sharp tool. Do you have a dial test indicator to get things lined up so as not to make a tapered shaft? Heck, you could even use the corner of an endmill in the spindle with the spindle locked as your lathe tool.

    An alternative is to have a friendly machine shop bore the coupling to fit the shaft. I see in later Schaublin 13s that they used a commercial off the shelf flexible shaft coupling in that application.

  5. Likes AlfaGTA liked this post
  6. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Benicia California USA
    Posts
    8,355
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1950
    Likes (Received)
    2699

    Default

    [QUOTE=michiganbuck;3553588]One can clamp a motor to a plate and set the plate on a surface grinder with the long travel locked..shim the plate or motor to indicate flat.. Fire up the motor and down-grind the shaft to size...put a hand made guard of nylon at the motor bearing to be sure no grit can enter there...might add an O ring to the nyoln guard.

    QUOTE]

    Pretty sure the OP does not have a lathe given his stated process to reduce the shaft OD.....
    Further,I would be pretty safe in assuming that he does not have a surface grinder either....

    Cheers Ross

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    11,673
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3983
    Likes (Received)
    4150

    Default

    I could likely set the job on that schaublin mill with a fair size die grinder and make +- .001 or better on the shaft..Likely dead on spot.. and grind the flat.
    Yes would use Janie's best towels to protcct the mill..and never hear the end of that.

    Qt the Op:[ via angle grinder or belt sander on the running motor.] is a plan to scrap the moror IMHO.

    Mounted grinding wheels...
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Industrie...bd3b79e56ce6aa

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Mexico
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    The topic of re-sizing motor shafts has come up on PM before, with many of the current solutions having been proposed previously. Though I don't have a lathe or surface grinder, as suggested here I could mount the motor to the table and reduce the shaft via a stationary tool like a lathe, or just hit it with a shaft mounted grinding wheel in the horizontal spindle like a surface grinder. That said since I already have the mill completely disassembled I'd like to get the motor replaced while I still have the option of turning the mill on its front to access the bottom. I think I will try to make a small reduction on a belt sander and then check the runout and decide whether to keep going or find a more accurate approach.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    11,673
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3983
    Likes (Received)
    4150

    Default

    Seems there might be someonw up to grinding a motor shaft in New Mexico.

    With center on both shaft ends on might rumn it on a larhe with a tool post grinder.. on am OD grinder..even TC grinder.
    Very likely it will be made scrap with trying to hand grind it..better sell it and buy a motor that has the right shaft. Perhaps make a lath turnning to couple he shaft so something the right size.

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    54
    Likes (Received)
    27

    Default

    I'd recommend that you go and buy a lathe - even a small Atlas or similar to help with the inevitable bushes and spacers (and motor shafts) that are needed on a project like this. You can always sell it on later when you buy a more suitable bedfellow for this mill.
    Frankly I wouldn't attempt a refresh/refurb of a mill without a lathe.

    Charles

  11. Likes Boat Brat, rklopp, AlfaGTA, J Grainger, ballen and 2 others liked this post
  12. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    113
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    65
    Likes (Received)
    55

    Default

    if you're willing to pay postage both ways and can send just the rotor and pulley I'm sure many people on here would be happy to turn down that shaft for you. Wouldn't take any time. I'd be happy to do it, though I'm a small fish in a big pond on here, skills wise.

  13. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Mexico
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    This was a good discussion, I appreciate the insight. I ended up buying a motor, off ebay with a 1/2" diam shaft, and turned it down free-hand with mixed results. I first ground down the key flush with the shaft to try to keep from creating a flat spot. This helped, but the shaft ended up being oval when I got done with it. I didn't check the run out, but you could feel it when it was running. I used a belt sander at first, then a file to finish up, though I would do more filing if I had to do it again. When the spline connector was mounted however the run out was no longer visible, or feelable. With the motor mounted to the rapid shaft, it turns freely with even (low) resistance across all 360 deg. At this point I think any non-concentricity from my flange adapter is a much bigger concern than the circularity of the motor shaft.

    In summary, turning down a motor shaft by hand is not a good idea for all the reasons mentioned, and I probably wouldn't do it again, but I believe it worked good enough in this case to not redo it. Here are some pictures. (btw the 42C motor is pushing it on size and it may cause more trouble when I install the main motor.)
    20200605_175837.jpg20200607_161213.jpg


    On a different topic, I have another lubrication question. The x and z feed gears don't appear to have any access for oil, and the gearbox cover is large (entire area between ways) and is made of relatively thin aluminum that doesn't look like it was meant to seal 100%. I also cant seem to find the ports that oil the way lines, but that is a different problem. The feed gears looks like a situation for grease, what kind would yall recommend, and how much to use?
    Thanks again
    20200607_161054.jpg

  14. #52
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Benicia California USA
    Posts
    8,355
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1950
    Likes (Received)
    2699

    Default

    Time to be a detective! That space does not look all that different from the setup on a Deckel manual mill...
    Sheet metal cover and oil gets oil to that space......flows in from the sides and fills the cavity and percolates down to lube the elevating screw.
    Additional channels lube the vertical ways and the "X" axis ways. Before introducing grease into this area i would want to understand the factory scheme.....
    One clue is the cover...looks like more screws there than would be needed to just hold a shield in place...Layout of the grooves and drillings on the
    face of the flat ways suggests oil, and if they are using oil there, my bet is oil gets to the gears as well.

    Euro machines almost always use oil for lubrication on this sort of mechanics....Especially in an area that requires removal of the vertical slide to gain access....Re-greasing becomes a big headache....
    Not so with oil... Further, if greased, how is the grease going to get into the vertical part of the shaft between the upper bevel and lower bevel gears? .Someone out there knows how this is designed to work....Or trace the drillings to be sure you understand how it all works. Pressurize the oil fittings with oil and see where it comes out....
    Cheers Ross

  15. Likes ballen liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •