FP2 logn reach head nod, can it be?? (very long post) - Page 4
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 61 to 65 of 65
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    20,357
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    6492

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    I agree with Thanos on this one....Hard to imagine how the joint of the vertical head swivel would sustain enough wear to cause any issues,,,,,,,Suppose anything is possible.

    My guess is that there was (is) another issue that you masked by "tweaking" the vertical head swivel joint.

    Cheers Ross
    One of the "possibles" on this - or any "pre-owned" machine - is that some prior minder may have attempted to optimize, correct, or reduce an apparent source of error.

    And not had any guarantee he had correctly ID'ed it, nor gone about a correction to best effect in the best manner.

    Machine tools to motor cars, we generally see more deleterious effects where monkey patching has been attempted than we do from incremental and predictable AKA "honest" wear.

    Thanos? you need to "assess" this critter using MANY approaches before getting into the same sort of mud-hole yerself.

    The old surgeon's maxim applies:

    "First, do no harm"

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    33
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    32
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    I agree with Thanos on this one....Hard to imagine how the joint of the vertical head swivel would sustain enough wear to cause any issues,,,,,,,Suppose anything is possible.

    My guess is that there was (is) another issue that you masked by "tweaking" the vertical head swivel joint.

    Cheers Ross
    Hi Ross,

    Not tweaking another issue, honest.
    My mill was for 35 years in operation on milling pressure dies for plate coolers for beer in Eastern Europe where I bought the machine.

    If you loosen al 6 bolts of the head with a tool in the spindle what gives extra force to the bottom and cleaning is not your favorite job then swiveling the head gives force to the bottom and in the years this surface was worn.

    Everything can happen.

    Best regards,

    Michael


    Verzonden vanaf mijn iPhone met Tapatalk

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Country
    GREECE
    Posts
    267
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    39
    Likes (Received)
    61

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fiat 128 View Post
    Hi Ross,

    Not tweaking another issue, honest.
    My mill was for 35 years in operation on milling pressure dies for plate coolers for beer in Eastern Europe where I bought the machine.

    If you loosen al 6 bolts of the head with a tool in the spindle what gives extra force to the bottom and cleaning is not your favorite job then swiveling the head gives force to the bottom and in the years this surface was worn.

    Everything can happen.

    Best regards,

    Michael


    Verzonden vanaf mijn iPhone met Tapatalk
    Impressive...I would have considered this one of the 'safest' zones, yet here it is...and it's the t-slot thing as well (for the fp2 at least) if one is heavy handed with the allen wrench...

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    20,357
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    6492

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thanvg View Post
    Impressive...I would have considered this one of the 'safest' zones, yet here it is...and it's the t-slot thing as well (for the fp2 at least) if one is heavy handed with the allen wrench...
    It's all about how a used machine tool spent its "former life".

    Take my two 10EE. Both have unusual wear patterns. But they are "unusual" in opposite directions.

    - The 1944 has severe bed wear. The carriage rides on the front flat way heavily and one can HEAR the surfacing-drive take-off drag along the shaft.

    - the 1942 has wear only just begun in the middle third of its travel on the front flat. It had not yet begun to damage the surfacing drive take-off.

    Neither shows the more common bed wear closest to the HS.

    Odds are that the '42 turned the same short part, close to center of travel, for many years, if not most of its entire prior working life. The '44 was probably used to turn a longer part that spanned nearly all of its 20" travel.

    Because the far worse overall wear on the '44 is so very, very evenly distributed, one can more easily turn out accurate parts than on the '42, whose LESSER wear is very UNevenly distributed.

    Which, BTW, is what "first tier" owners just DO.

    "Company" machine-tools, many places, do not get rebuilt, nor even well-maintained. Their hired, not "owner", Machinists just make-do by compensating until the machine is finally pushed out the door and into the hands of second, third, and beyond tier ownership.

    Even so, most will go with only minimal maintenance, not a full rebuild, in the hands of the next 2 or 3 owners as well.

    Any "revenue" shop has many priorities to juggle. Downtime and expense of a rebuild has to be justifiable vs the cost of other options - continued making do, trading-off for a better used machine, not very often a brand-new machine. Not very often a "proper" rebuild, either - not unless the machine is of scarce capacity or rare capability AND the shop actually NEEDS that niche covered. "Nice to have" is an expensive luxury. DAMHIKT!

    Only when "the bones" get into the hands of more desperate shops, slower movers, or retirees and hobbyists - not just "any" such - but those who have the time, skills, and financial resources to spare - does the potential for that long-overdue rebuild go up.

    Sadly, the same crowd is far better at taking their machines apart that putting them back together. Many get PAINTED, but never otherwise seen-to. The restoration effort fades away, the parts get kicked around so long they go missing by the time the carcass is sold-off as a nuisance project - or even at an Estate sale.

    We could wish it were otherwise, but that's all too common a scenario.

    Remember - PM sees mostly the SUCCESS stories. Not so much the failures. No one brags about those, they just fade way.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Country
    GREECE
    Posts
    267
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    39
    Likes (Received)
    61

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    ...

    Only when "the bones" get into the hands of more desperate shops, slower movers, or retirees and hobbyists - not just "any" such - but those who have the time, skills, and financial resources to spare - does the potential for that long-overdue rebuild go up.

    Sadly, the same crowd is far better at taking their machines apart that putting them back together. Many get PAINTED, but never otherwise seen-to. The restoration effort fades away, the parts get kicked around so long they go missing by the time the carcass is sold-off as a nuisance project - or even at an Estate sale.

    ....
    Most right...


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
2