How to ship a FP2
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  1. #1
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    Default How to ship a FP2

    Hi All,

    Well I have bought an FP2. Very happy! The seller has arranged for a company to build a fully enclosed crate to ship it to me. I specified a full crate as it will be in transit for about 6 weeks and I thought it would help to keep it safe. The problem is, he mentioned “oh yea we will strap it down well, don’t worry” so naturally I’m worried! Can anyone give advice on the best way to strap/bolt/chock a fp2 and electric cabinet? Any pictures would be ideal, much easier if I can send him a picture of exactly what is required.

    Thanks in advance for any help.

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    I shipped a lathe transatlantic, and had a professional build a crate for this. It was someone with years of experience in shipping tools and equipment. He told me that the most important thing was a solid and thick base which was larger than the machine itself. He made it from 2" (50mm) thick material (fir, I think) with a layer of 3/4" (19mm) plywood screwed to the top and another 2" (50mm) layer of runners below at 90 degrees to the layer above to leave space for the forks of a fork lift to enter. The critical parts of the lathe were bolted down to this base, using machine bolts that went through the base with steel plates on the bottom to spread the load.

    So as an FP2 owner, I would suggest a thick base along the lines above, with bolts going through the cast iron base in the four corners, through the entire wood base, then passing through steel plates and captured in nuts. Then add an OSB or plywood box around the entire machine to protect it from rain, people, contact with other stuff.

    Note: I am told that wood used in crates for international shipping has to carry certain "stamps of approval" regarding the source and treatment of the wood. I don't know if that's true, or if you can just pick it up from your local building supply store.

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    Hi Ballen,

    I’m thinking along the same lines as you, I did mention bolting the machine down to the seller, that comment was met with a surprised silence. Think I might have my work cut out for me. I have already requested the crate be significantly larger than the machine in the hope of it being more stable. The same company has done other jobs for the seller and he has promised pictures of that job, should give a good idea of any suggestions that need to be made.
    I think you are correct about the certification of the wood crate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boat Brat View Post
    I did mention bolting the machine down to the seller, that comment was met with a surprised silence.
    Where is the machine coming from? Perhaps instead of leaving the crating up to the seller, you should look for a specialist to do it. Here is the company that I used, in the Boston area: ACE Packaging & Crating, Inc.

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    Made several shipping pallets for FP2's.
    My setup is similar to Bruce's design with a few detail differences.

    I used 2x6 planks arranged parallel with the "X" axis and planked the full depth of the shipping base....
    As stated above the base needs to be wider than the widest part of the machine (Table with hand wheels)

    Do not make the base overly deep. Too deep and the forklift may have trouble balancing the load....The electrical box cam nest at the rear of the machine if laid down on its side.
    Use carpet scraps to shield the paint.

    Construct the base using 4x4's running at right angles to the top planking at the outside edges of the base.
    lag bolt the planks to the stringers.

    Through bolt the machine through the planking using large washers or steel sheet to increase the area of contact against the wood.
    I fit the bolts from the bottom, Sheet steel welded to the bolt head....Nut goes on the machine base side with appropriate washer and "Nylock" nuts.
    I do this to prevent snagging the nuts with the fork lift when moving.

    I make a safety corral around the machine base using 2x4's and lag bolts capturing all 4 sides plus the nesting spot for the electrical cabinet. Provide "eye" bolts (lag screw) for strapping over the
    electrical cabinet....

    Secure the control pendant arm with soft strapping to the table. (motorcycle tie down?)

    Spray machine with protective coating all exposed surfaces...I prefer LPS3.....Wrap up cable connector ends and secure cables.

    Form perimeter ledge using 2x4's , lag screwed t the deck I would make this perimeter inside the outside edges of the base by about 4" to give a ledge for tie down. This perimeter will give a mounting base for the enclosure box.....

    Shrink wrap the machine..include several bags of desiccant.

    Frame the sides using 1x4 to make an edge on all the side and top sheets.
    Join the side sheets using steel angles at the corners. use dry wall screws through the perimeter at the bottom to secure the sides to the base.....Top should fit inside of the sides, screwed through.

    Sides need to have runners (2x4) going the long direction (horizontal) edge to edge at least at center height, and screwed to the covering sheeting.

    Cheers Ross

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    The base does not need to be that thick as long as you have 2 skids right under the machine
    Make sure a pallettruck can go under it and lift the machine in balance Bolt the machine to the skids directly
    So if you order for the crate ask for 2 loose additional skids

    Then I like to screw some 2x4 to the walls of the crate about the hight of the table and then another 2x4 bolted to the table and screwed to the 2x4 on the wall

    Conservation oil on the machine
    Then the machine in a big plastic bag Seal it with decent tape
    And a dehumifier inside the bag

    I think I have some pictures somewhere

    Peter

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    Hi All,

    Thanks for the tips so far. I should have given more information in my initial post. I have bought the machine from a dealer in South Africa, shipping destination is New Zealand. I’m currently in Europe, to fly down to SA is not so expensive but all up it would add probably $1k so not really practical.( should have really been down there today for the rugby final) the shipping quote I have lists the transit time as 47 days.
    The crate is to be made by a company that specialises in that. I have attached some pictures supplied by the seller of another machine they shipped recently. From what I can tell the X-rays has the correct international standards marks stamped on it, although the quality of the wood and specifically the amount of bark still on the wood is a problem for entry in to New Zealand. I only see nails holding it together, i don’t see the strapping doing much to secure the machine. So a few things to discuss with the seller.
    Any other things I should mention?

    6250627e-1298-4f43-8c22-85a735166c35.jpgee988cac-49af-481b-aeae-ea7a85486779.jpgaaa8ee0e-d978-49e1-97f8-9f1558a3584e.jpg0825523e-78a2-42b6-b4a3-66567a0618a6.jpg9d3795a8-79a5-469c-95b5-2f0c79a71230.jpg

    Machine will be sprayed with Tectyl? Before wrapping. Will ask about desiccant.

    Thanks.

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    Here are a couple of pictures of how my FP2 was crated.
    img_5827.jpg
    img_5828.jpg
    Sorry about the sideways pics, I don't know why they're coming out that way.

    The base was bolted through the double (2*3/4") plywood with something like 3/4" lag bolts. Note how all the accessories are scattered in the base, though the dividing head was bolted or screwed down. Before they closed up the crate, they did package the loose miscellany in heavy paper, so that nothing banged or rubbed in transit.

    This was adequate for a one-stop overnight trip from NJ to a Montreal depot, but I wouldn't have wanted it going much further in this state.

    What I would have wanted additionally for a longer trip, is
    1. big, heavy washers or a plate for the bolts holding the mill down
    2. some cross bracing for the uprights
    3. the loose stuff individually crated or boxed
    4. better support and some headroom on the top sheet, maybe a couple of 2x4" supports bracing it.


    I could have envisioned the lag bolts ripping through the plywood, seeing how these crates get thrown around by forklift operators - even just witnessing it loaded on the crane truck at my end was concerning.

    The only problem I found was that the lifting eye bolt on the vertical head support had rubbed against the top plywood sheet and had broken through it. Presumably something was stacked on top of the crate at some point . No damage to the mill or head that I've found though.

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    Ah if mine had been crated even half as well, it was just shipped strapped onto a 80x120cm EUR pallet. It got here mostly alright () but somewhere the X-axis scale had been crushed because it was not protected.

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    I promised some pictures of how I do it











    See in the last picture that we have 2 runners directly under the machine
    I came to do so after I had a crate dropped down a bit hard with a pallettruck (You know a cheap one that you cannot lower slowly)
    and noticed the bottem came loose from the sidewalls even though it was screwed every 20 cm
    No need for a thick bottem this way This bottem is 18mm
    Now that we bolted the table to the crate sidewalls even if it falls over it should stay in position
    With this crate we sealed all the seams with a sealer
    Nowadays we put it it in plastic
    It was in cosmolite already when we bought it
    Also notice there is nothing loose in the crate Everything is tied down

    Peter

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    Hi Peter,

    Thank you very much, I'm punching out an email to the seller at this minute. your message came just in time.

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    Hi Peter,

    This crate looks very good, along with your guidelines. Thanks for posting it. I had a question about only one point:

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    No need for a thick bottom this way. This bottom is 18mm.
    The experts who I talked with all stressed the importance of a much thicker and stronger bottom. But maybe it is not needed. Have you shipped machines across the Atlantic Ocean or to Australia in crates like this? Were the crates/machines still in good shape after arrival?

    Cheers,
    Bruce

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    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    Hi Peter,

    This crate looks very good, along with your guidelines. Thanks for posting it. I had a question about only one point:

    The experts who I talked with all stressed the importance of a much thicker and stronger bottom. But maybe it is not needed. Have you shipped machines across the Atlantic Ocean or to Australia in crates like this? Were the crates/machines still in good shape after arrival?

    Cheers,
    Bruce
    Only on a realy concave bottem you might see some stress on the bottem/sidewall seam
    These conditions are not commen in a container
    Also the bottem is still 18mm on a relativly small surface
    I screw the sidewalls every 15cm or so
    And yes I shipped machines like this Never had any complaints
    This one went to Shri Lanka and I got some compliments for packing

    Peter

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