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  1. #81
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    Hope you're feeling well Tyrone.

    Thanks guys, good stuff. I'm not worried about breaking them to get them out. I'd like to straight up replace them. I'm not at that point yet, just looking ahead a little, before i start filling new oil. I like seeing levels and oil color clearly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    Hope you're feeling well Tyrone.

    Thanks guys, good stuff. I'm not worried about breaking them to get them out. I'd like to straight up replace them. I'm not at that point yet, just looking ahead a little, before i start filling new oil. I like seeing levels and oil color clearly.
    Do mind yer health and best you can Tyrone.

    For anyone as does not already have such, the bent-nose pliers that expand from within to grip a tube are nice to have - sight glasses either threaded OR "wiggle out".

    Beats chipping them to bits with a micro-chisel then mining the sump for shards, anyway.

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  5. #83
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    I'm better than I was at the weekend ! See the " Prostate " thread for more information.

    Be very, very careful with the exposed lead screws. They are nothing like as strong as they look. Your eye sees the major diameter but they're only as strong as the minor diameter. If you bend one it's not easy getting them to run true again. Don't ask me how I know that. I always whipped them out if I could and put them somewhere very safe.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    but they're only as strong as the minor diameter.
    +1 never studied on it, but perhaps not-even.

    I tend to look at threaded goods in bending load as similar to perforated "tear here" paper and plastic packaging.

    Sort of "pre-weakened", if you will.

    2CW

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    +1 never studied on it, but perhaps not-even.

    I tend to look at threaded goods in bending load as similar to perforated "tear here" paper and plastic packaging.

    Sort of "pre-weakened", if you will.


    2CW
    That's been my experience. For some reason lead screws bend more easily than you would think.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    Hi Texas,



    Thank you. What took most of the time was assembling the right materials, making a jig for grinding the blades, and making a honing machine to hone them. Learning to scrape the pockets just took a few hours of practice.



    I wasn't suggesting that you do it yourself, because I know you want to get this machine back together quickly. I was suggesting that you find someone who is experienced with a Biax half-moon scraper, and pay them for a couple of hours of their time. That's all it would take.





    I totally understand this and feel the same way about having a machine in pieces. When I'm in that situation, I feel slightly nervous until I get it back together.

    Cheers,
    Bruce
    If it takes longer than 10 minutes to learn how to push a " BIAX " flaker across a plate at the right speed and the right angle there's something wrong.
    I always marked out with a black felt tip pen to get the flake lines more accurately positioned. The ones on the plate are too far apart. You could get another row of half moons in between the existing rows. I'd say looking at the spacings of the half moons you're pushing across the plate slightly too slow.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    That's been my experience. For some reason lead screws bend more easily than you would think.

    Regards Tyrone.
    Worst of a bad bunch, any "allthread" rod, and the vise operating screw, Kasto's larger power HS. Absolutely needs converted to tension, rather than compression. In my next life...maybe. Devil would, of course, just make me keep using it as-built. How's that for a vision of Hell?


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    Hi Tyrone,

    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    The ones on the plate are too far apart. You could get another row of half moons in between the existing rows. I'd say looking at the spacings of the half moons you're pushing across the plate slightly too slow.
    That's not me doing it, this video is a Biax advert. I've never even picked up a Biax HM scraper.

    If you watch the video, you'll see that he does another set of half moons at 90 degrees to this set. So that fills it out quite a bit.

    Cheers,
    Bruce

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    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    Hi Tyrone,



    That's not me doing it, this video is a Biax advert. I've never even picked up a Biax HM.

    If you watch the video, you'll see that he does another set of half moons at 90 degrees to this set. So that fills it out quite a bit.

    Cheers,
    Bruce
    Hi Bruce, I know you weren't responsible for the flaking. I was just commenting on the appearance of the work. The lines need to be much more even and straighter. Even if the scraper intends on on going back the other way at 90 degrees the lines need to be a bit closer.

    Regards Tyrone.

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  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    Dear Texas,

    That's quite a machine! Very nice that you are breaking it down to clean it up as part of the move into it's new home.



    Just in this past week I finished scraping new oil pockets onto the ways of a Studer RHU 450 grinder (see my avatar). I got a lot of help and advice from Richard King, who is active here on PM. I would think that your machine's ways would benefit from that as well. Probably an expert (not me!!) with a Biax half-moon flaker could do it very fast.
    I thought I'd reply to this again, lol. After your post, I began to casually look at the possibilities. I do read multiple forum categories in Practical Machinist, but I doubt I get to half. Though I have been gradually expanding more, as I learn more, and become more acquainted.

    Richard King, who you mentioned, happens to be coming to my area this coming weekend for a scraping class, including Biax:
    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-class-338741/

    He is going to another forum member's shop to hold this class, whom I'm familiar with swatkins, (Steve Watkins). While I have not met him face to face, his shop is about 2 hours away from me.

    I did inquire about the class, and they do have room. If I can swing it, I may go. I should know Thursday morning. That's cutting it close as the class starts Friday morning.

    Just an interesting coincidence, with the conversation that's been going on about it, haha. And interesting timing, as I just happen to have some of this apart.

    Like you mentioned later, I am feeling the self inflicted pressure of getting it back together though. Due to floor space, this is probably the last machine I can take on, at least until I sell something that may be less useful to me. Its gotten pretty tight now, and big hunks of iron laying all around is not helping. And I still need to move the column in. I'm just feeling the time crunch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post

    Be very, very careful with the exposed lead screws. They are nothing like as strong as they look. Your eye sees the major diameter but they're only as strong as the minor diameter. If you bend one it's not easy getting them to run true again. Don't ask me how I know that. I always whipped them out if I could and put them somewhere very safe.

    Regards Tyrone.
    I have been careful in removing the table, as well as in how I have moved the knee, in that I have not banged or put any pressure on the lead screw. My only mistake was in transport. I had been preparing to jam some blocks of wood between lead screw and the far ends of saddle, to add support from the weight of lead screws hanging out unsupported.

    Somewhere, somehow, I forgot and traveled that way. I don't think anything is damaged, I was just kind of mad at myself about that. With the weight of knee, plus the trailer i used to haul it, the ride was pretty smooth, and not a long distance. Also, not sure if it is the backlash compensators, or not, but there is some kind of spring tension that is holding the lead screw centered in that assembly in the middle of saddle. Gently raising up on lead screw, or attempting to move it around a little, you feel the springs wanting to center it. So it can move a little without actually stressing the screw.

    Anyway, inspecting afterwards, I didn't find any problems. And I'm doing my best to be cautious.

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    Also as Tyrone suggested, I did want to removed saddle to clean, inspect, and lube. This will be somewhat more complicated, and probably a a bit of a project on its own. I'll probably make 3 posts to show pics.

    The right side of saddle is held to ways by what is atleast in part, a electric junction, or control box. I will need to drop that, and maybe get inside for hidden hardware holding it to saddle. And that will be the easy side. . .

    80.jpg81.jpg82.jpg

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    The left side has a gear box attached to saddle. Cross feed screw attaches to it. No easy way I can see to remove crossfeed screw. What I am thinking is using a jack to support this gear box. Unbolt it, then remove saddle.

    This also will have hidden hardware. I am not sure if the hardware will be in that electric access in saddle, above feed motor. Or if I will also need to open gear box.

    Its all doable, I think. Just may get more time consuming.

    A couple of things on my mind about it:
    Do I clean vertical ways first, mount knee to column, then do saddle ? I like this for secure mounting, also for opening up usable floor space to actually work.

    My hesitation with that is the lube system. It is a little complicated, and I want to know it works. If I mount knee to vertical ways, I won't be able to see that portion of lube system work. There are many very small metal tubes that branch off and supply lube to everything. . . Its really a whole other topic and project. . .lol.

    Anyway, i'm rolling that around in my head as I go as well.

    83.jpg84.jpg85.jpg86.jpg87.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    on my mind about it:
    Do I clean vertical ways first, mount knee to column, then do saddle ? I like this for secure mounting, also for opening up usable floor space to actually work.

    My hesitation with that is the lube system. It is a little complicated, and I want to know it works. If I mount knee to vertical ways, I won't be able to see that portion of lube system work. There are many very small metal tubes that branch off and supply lube to everything. . . Its really a whole other topic and project. . .lol.
    Much the same, 2/3 scale "Quartet". One of the exposed lube lines appears to not even be "factory" but a long ago shop add-on, rather. Because.. at least one of mine HAS failed.

    Now.. on your one? You have some less labour and risk intensive options, and they are valid ones.

    You have been seeing uncommonly pristine-clean electricals and lube. The alternative could gag a swarfworm.

    And yes, you CAN determine if the vertical ways are getting lube - on the machine or on the hoist. Same again w/r the saddle.

    Unless you plan to DUPLICATE the b***h, milled from the solid? Don't worry about HOW.
    Swiss or Italian, they knew their s**t. Worry only that it still works.

    Might be a Very Good Idea to flush debris and confirm clear lube WITHOUT any more tear-down risk or time. You got a good one. Innocent until proven guilty. Take advantage of that, do less, risk less, run it sooner.

    You can ALWAYS fix what proves to actually NEED it, later. Surely it won't sneak out of the shop at night...

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    A peek at the vertical ways on knee, just after removal from column in pic 1. Spent about 15 minutes or so chipping the years of garbage out in pic 2, which exposed the lube lines there.

    Got around to cleaning it up a little better. Still has flaking marks. A little thin at the bottom, but I can deal with that. Need to clean it up a little more.

    88.jpg89.jpg90.jpg91.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    A peek at the vertical ways on knee, just after removal from column in pic 1. Spent about 15 minutes or so chipping the years of garbage out in pic 2, which exposed the lube lines there.

    Got around to cleaning it up a little better. Still has flaking marks. A little thin at the bottom, but I can deal with that. Need to clean it up a little more.

    88.jpg89.jpg90.jpg91.jpg
    Wonder if the Swiss/Italian outfit used a metering unit as common in metric Europe as Bijur are here? OR even USED Bijurs?

    You finding some "modern" putty/Bondo cousin used for bedding those lines?

    Or the old amorphous Sulfur as Monarch had used?

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    Thinking about what we discussed on the lube lines, I think I can run a test and clean them pretty much right where it is.

    There is 2 main lube connections that I found. One is to saddle for those parts, the other is on knee. I have a hand pump I use for priming diesel engines. I was going to work out connecting it to those two connections, and pump fuel or mineral spirits through it. Then when cleaned out, pump fresh clean oil through it.

    92.jpg93.jpg94.jpg95.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Wonder if the Swiss/Italian outfit used a metering unit as common in metric Europe as Bijur are here? OR even USED Bijurs?

    You finding some "modern" putty/Bondo cousin used for bedding those lines?

    Or the old amorphous Sulfur as Monarch had used?
    Not sure if it was putty or coolant, but most was gone if putty. It was mostly dirt, chips, and oily paste. I did have remnants of a white chalky substance around the fittings of those lines, you can see traces of the white down near the bottom of center spacing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Wonder if the Swiss/Italian outfit used a metering unit as common in metric Europe as Bijur are here? OR even USED Bijurs
    I have not worked out the full function or type. I have a separate box. there appears to be a pump or cylinder inside. It takes an external air line. I read something briefly about it in the book, about operation. But it was a quick read, I need to go over that more as I get closer to that stage.

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  33. #100
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    Hi Texas, the job is going well I see. Where does the way lube oil come from ? Is it from a separate reservoir or does it draw oil from the knee gearbox ?

    I've worked on similar machines where the oil was drawn from the knee gearbox. I'm not keen on that idea for several reasons so on some machines I converted the system to oil pumps mounted on the column that fed the existing piped system.

    The more I see of the build quality of your machine the more impressed I am. That's a very well made machine.

    Regards Tyrone.

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