Replicating Deckel machine plates
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    Default Replicating Deckel machine plates

    I don't know if you can still buy these plates anywhere. I looked but did not find anything. Several of the plates on my machine where in bad condition so I removed them when I repainted the machine. The plate on the vertical spindle casting was just gone, ripped off for whatever reason by the earlier owners. I am planning to remake the plates, or if failing that see if I can get the designs made. I have tried to replicate as closely as possible the old signs, but I don't know what fonts were really used. I used font ID software online to get close.

    This is the design for the long reach head, 37 x 74 mm:

    Large version

    And this one is for the tilting table also 37 x 74 mm:


    Large version

    The designs also change with the years, these are based on the ones on my 1958 machine. I have noticed on later versions the plates are black and metal colored. On this vintage they instead went with a copper color, looks very nice to me, nicer than the later black ones.



    I am not sure how they developed the plates historically, but I think going about it in the same way one makes PCB boards would work, using photo-resist spray and a printed design on OHP paper to develop a pattern that can be developed. I am thinking chemical etching perhaps, I have this solution of copper, sulfuric acid and etchant chemical, if I paint a metal surface with it, it develops a copper layer a few atoms thick, home brew layout fluid...
    Might be a quick and easy way.

    Other ideas I am contemplating is electroplating or anodizing if using aluminum. There is a process were you plate things using a brush nowadays that looks suitable.

    This is a low priority area for me, so don't expect an update too soon. But I thought maybe people here would find it interesting.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    I don't know if you can still buy these plates anywhere. I looked but did not find anything. Several of the plates on my machine where in bad condition so I removed them when I repainted the machine. The plate on the vertical spindle casting was just gone, ripped off for whatever reason by the earlier owners. I am planning to remake the plates, or if failing that see if I can get the designs made. I have tried to replicate as closely as possible the old signs, but I don't know what fonts were really used. I used font ID software online to get close.

    This is the design for the long reach head, 37 x 74 mm:

    Large version

    And this one is for the tilting table also 37 x 74 mm:


    Large version

    The designs also change with the years, these are based on the ones on my 1958 machine. I have noticed on later versions the plates are black and metal colored. On this vintage they instead went with a copper color, looks very nice to me, nicer than the later black ones.



    I am not sure how they developed the plates historically, but I think going about it in the same way one makes PCB boards would work, using photo-resist spray and a printed design on OHP paper to develop a pattern that can be developed. I am thinking chemical etching perhaps, I have this solution of copper, sulfuric acid and etchant chemical, if I paint a metal surface with it, it develops a copper layer a few atoms thick, home brew layout fluid...
    Might be a quick and easy way.

    Other ideas I am contemplating is electroplating or anodizing if using aluminum. There is a process were you plate things using a brush nowadays that looks suitable.

    This is a low priority area for me, so don't expect an update too soon. But I thought maybe people here would find it interesting.
    Don't reinvent a common wheel. Done lots of them for NEW goods, limited-production & prototypes using this stuff:

    Our Metalphoto Anodized Aluminum - MPC

    Serious-durable to begin with - I have like-new examples on Walnut wall-plaques commemorating the Lunar landing. On the moon. Not the Walnut.

    So long as you have the artwork, easy to make another one "whenever".

    Rather a lot of the originals were made with this same technology, after all.

    Nearly all machine-tool manufacture is fairly low-volume compared to microwave ovens, electric motors, or even hand-held power tools where faster-yet methods are applied.

  3. #3
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    I agree with Thermite.

    My Studer RHU-450 was delivered without the nameplate. Fortunately the the serial number was stamped in a half-dozen places on the machine, and it was easy to copy the design based on a photo from another owner. So I had a nameplate made in 1mm anodised aluminium by Brunel Engraving in the UK Engraved Nameplates, Plaques, Signs & Badges - Brunel Engraving. Cost was 12.50 pounds + 7.95 pounds shipping, order to delivery time was about a week.

    Anodised aluminium is a good choice because it's extremely solvent and oil resistant.


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