weight of ruhla FUW 250 / 710, ruhla [thiel] duplex 58 or 159 - Page 6
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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark in Portugal View Post
    Now all the power functions are working!
    Congratulations!

    The problems you outlined are very real, and very annoying, but they are all fixable without huge effort or special skills and tools. I would say that the real deciding factor is the geometry of the ways and the condition of the spindles. If the way were properly lubricated and are not worn out, and if the spindle bearings were properly lubricated and are in good shape, then in the end you'll have a very nice machine and a good deal.
    Last edited by ballen; 06-04-2021 at 07:41 AM.

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    Thanks;

    I knew I was taking a chance on this machine, and I did because I am good at this sort of thing.
    Luckily some good folks helped me with the correct documentation, and I was able to get it together.

    I've been using a lathe for about 10 years now but I've never operated a mill before, or even seen one in use.
    I'm really looking forward to it!

    After I get it into place my first job will probably be to cut down the gear rack I bought for it, to fit the groove in the top slide.
    I fitted the new pinion gear already.

  3. #103
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    I moved the machine into the shop yesterday; Lifted it with my tractor and set it in the container on wood blocks, lifted it off the blocks with ropes, set it on the floor, then pushed it to the back.

    Here are some pictures;

    ready-lift.jpg

    lifting-off-wood-blocks.jpg

    first-push.jpg

    diagonal-pull.jpg

    pushing-2x4.jpg

  4. #104
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    pushing-left.jpg

    fitting-table.jpg

    mounting-spindle-head.jpg

    I already had a 380V 3-phase outlet there, it just plugs in.

    Now I just have to learn to use it.

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  6. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark in Portugal View Post
    I've been using a lathe for about 10 years now but I've never operated a mill before, or even seen one in use.
    I'm really looking forward to it!
    Some advice from a newbie to a newbie: when you clamp a piece, always ask yourself: what will happen if the clamping doesn't hold? Will the cutter simply push the piece out of the way and stop cutting? That might damage the part or your pride, but that's it. Or will the cutter draw the part in, springing the frame of the machine, and potentially turning the part and/or broken cutter into a high-velocity metal missile aimed at your head or other sensitive bits?

    Often, clamping and setup take (much) longer than the actual cutting.

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  8. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    Some advice from a newbie to a newbie: when you clamp a piece, always ask yourself: what will happen if the clamping doesn't hold? Will the cutter simply push the piece out of the way and stop cutting? That might damage the part or your pride, but that's it. Or will the cutter draw the part in, springing the frame of the machine, and potentially turning the part and/or broken cutter into a high-velocity metal missile aimed at your head or other sensitive bits?

    Often, clamping and setup take (much) longer than the actual cutting.

    Thanks for that, I will keep it in mind.

    Long setup time is a familiar area for me.

    I have some other jobs for a few days, then I hope to have time in the shop again.

  9. #107
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    Default Ruhla mill

    Mark, I'm here in Portugal & happy to help you get going. I have lots of toolholders, cutters, etc., etc., just ask if you want me to come across. Ray.

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  11. #108
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    To get the vertical ways tight, I had to push the adjustment wedge past it's design point.
    The forward + back one too, but only a little.
    The main left-right for the long table movement was not bad though, so I assume it's been repaired or replaced.
    I mad this little finger thing to hold it down, and a spacer for the other end too.
    ruhla-250-710-vertical-slide-adjustment-adaptor.jpg

    First milling job was cutting down this gear rack to fit the empty grove in the top slide. I bought a matching gear and cut it down to fit.

    gear-rack-cut.jpg

    top-slide-drive-gear-parts.jpg

    Looks good;
    topslide-handle-new.jpg

    But the balls hit the protrusion on the lower slide! Oh well, can't win 'em all.

    topslide-handle-error.jpg

  12. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark in Portugal View Post
    T

    But the balls hit the protrusion on the lower slide! Oh well, can't win 'em all.

    topslide-handle-error.jpg
    Remove the handle assembly. Heat the spokes close to the hub and bend the handles out some and it will clear. It will be easier to use as well....
    Cheers Ross

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  14. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    Remove the handle assembly. Heat the spokes close to the hub and bend the handles out some and it will clear. It will be easier to use as well....
    Cheers Ross
    I'll do that; I'll have to weld the spokes to the hub though, or they'll unscrew and flop around in use and be annoying.

    Future disassembly will require cutting.

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    I would use lochtite

    Peter

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    Well that is interesting!

    Are you sure that a rack is intended to go in that groove? On the Thiels and possibly also Deckels there is a chain fitted and the handle has a little sprocket. A rack will work just as well, possibly even better but it will be a more expensive way of doing it.

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    There was a sort of sprocket for a chain, but no chain.
    With the grove being just 10mm wide and 11mm deep, something quite specific has to go in there.

    I went with the rack and gear because I could get them. The parts didn't cost too much but had to be cut down a lot to fit.

    The sprocket is slightly damaged, as if excess force was applied.
    At least one person of reduced intelligence has had hands on this mill, so it could be that a lever was used instead of releasing the clamps...

    The coolant pump didn't work because someone wired it backwards.
    The gear change mechanism was badly molested, missing parts.
    Some strange wires had been added.
    Someone broke a pulley trying to pry it off instead of using a puller.
    One gear is totally stripped of teeth.

    Loctite; I don't think it would be nearly strong enough.
    Welding is definitely strong enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark in Portugal View Post
    Loctite; I don't think it would be nearly strong enough.
    If the parts are cleaned and you use the correct adhesive, it is PLENTY strong enough!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    If the parts are cleaned and you use the correct adhesive, it is PLENTY strong enough!

    Yes, but if he is going to heat and bend the spokes for clearance, that would kill the LocTite....
    Personally, I would silver solder the spokes in position after the bending...Silver will give a much cleaner joint over a weld bead, easier to get it all around the spoke as well..
    You will already be getting things hot to make the bends....assemble the spokes with the flux on the threads, do the bend and while its hot flow in some
    silver and your done....

    Cheers Ross

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  21. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by billmac View Post
    Well that is interesting!

    Are you sure that a rack is intended to go in that groove? On the Thiels and possibly also Deckels there is a chain fitted and the handle has a little sprocket. A rack will work just as well, possibly even better but it will be a more expensive way of doing it.

    Think the chain is used because its way less affected by chips and swarf.....A rack will tend to jam up if it gets even small chips and dirt down in the teeth......A chain has lots of open space for chips and the like to
    be expelled or pushed clear of the driving sprocket....

    That rack might be well covered....but we all know how chips can sneak into impossible spaces......Can't tell, but if the teeth of that rack face up it will make a nice spot for junk to just drop in and lodge.

    Cheers Ross

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  23. #117
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    Guys, it's a 10 minute job; weld it, heat it, bend it, regrease it.

    top-slide-handle.jpg

    The rack is teeth down, while chips could fly up into the slot in some setups, it's not a problem I'll be losing any sleep about.


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