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  1. #21
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    It's comforting to know I'm not nearly as far out there as you are!

    I have a Mori MV65B VMC that is about 19 tons. It has 8 pads spread over a 10x10' area under the main casting (base is one solid piece unlike some 60" VMC's that have outboard supports in x). When I got it I was going to pour a foundation for it, but I couldn't be 100% sure the mill would stay where I planned to put it. Turned out, fully assembled, it was way too big to fit where I planned it and I moved it to a different place in the shop. The concrete under the machine now is 7-8" thick and has 18" of packed 4" crush and run over geotextile. The same spot on the floor was home to an 18K lb Mori VMC and the floor showed no sign of moving during leveling. However, with the 38K lb Mori in the same spot the floor was flexible under the extra weight. It leveled up and holds level, but I think a proper isolated foundation is needed to use the machine to it's potential.

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  3. #22
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    Nerv, if this is the machine I think it is, then I helped a previous owner get it going many years ago when it was in California. Regarding the interlocks, much of what we did was to bypass the interlocks to at least get it to home and prove that it fundamentally worked, with the intent of re-engaging them later as we were able to figure things out. I have a Maho MH1200C (5 axis) with 532 control (386 based, not 486 VME card based like yours) and had to do the same to get it running many years ago. The interlocks are a pain, but they are there for a reason, and if they don't work, it is often because a door is not closed properly (because it's bent or the switch is bad), or because something isn't hooked up (like the huge coolant tank/pump system you referred to). Or there could be a failed part or course. The way oil pump on mine, for example, was intermittently bad and would shut my machine down. I fixed it by swapping a transistor on the I/O board. For the MC800H, the coolant system was the main thing we had to bypass for our initial bringup. Bypassing it was done by literally shorting past the interlock relays in the electrical cabinet. I don't like doing that, but before we spent the time messing with the machine, we needed to see if it actually ran (would home, run the spindle, and move in all axis). So you may still find some of what we did in the machine. Crimp connectors and wire bypasses.

    The machine was eventually sold to a company in Canada - which is why I assume yours is the one I worked with as I see you are in Canada. I don't know what they did with it after that. I was told they intended to bring in Maho techs to complete the task of brining it up, but this was maybe 5 years ago.

    Because your CNC532 control is the 486DX based VME card version, if I remember correctly, you should be able to attach a standard VGA LCD monitor to it if the CRT displays are bad. That's what we did in the beginning. I think one of CRT's was bad, so we had to use an LCD. So forget anything you've read about LCD retrofits for your machine as your machine works with standard VGA LCD monitors.

    I have PDF scans of the manuals and schematics that came with that machine if you are interested. PM me.

    Regards,
    Michael

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  5. #23
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    Thank you for commenting on this, I'm sure you are right this is the same machine.

    Makes me wonder how many machines like this even made it over to North America.

    I have been cleaning the Knoll drag style chip conveyor and been studying the entire coolant system that was built for this machine. Never seen that style of chip conveyor before, at first I was wondering where the conveyor belt was. Someone removed the float operated pump from that conveyor as well as cut some of the big pipe that comes from the initial coolant screen on the conveyor side. Any photos or info on how this is supposed to look would be very helpful. I'm hoping I can track down the removed pump and bring it back to original condition.

    I'm thinking of using that main coolant filtration unit as a central coolant system for all my CNC machines and just running float operated pumps from all my other machines to that central unit. I think it holds 1100L? Makes every other system I've seen seem like a joke, including a couple CNC grinders.

  6. #24
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    Fantastic reading-waiting for some more

  7. #25
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    Good day everyone. The big Deckel Maho is almost ready to be moved, again.

    She is largely undressed, mind the rust colored sections, it is mostly rusting metal chip dust that came off the top sections when they were removed. All will be shiny when we are through:

    20170802_202304.jpg

    So I thought I would get a quote on the missing chip guard for the X axis that is clearly missing in this picture. Anyone want to guess how much DMG wants for an item like that? Lets just say I had others quote on the same part and they came in at 1/4 the price. That is not a typo or an exaggeration.

    Know that if you are investing in this equipment and the company behind it, you had better have one or more of the following:

    1. Tremendous amounts of almost unlimited money. Unlimited money works too.
    2. A warranty that covers pretty much everything.
    3. Machine tool, electrical and PLC diagnosis and repair skills that allow you to keep it going for 99% of all issues, as well as knowledge and relationships with everyone in the industry that can make or repair what you can't.

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  9. #26
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    After working another day on the MC800H...

    The vertical thick walled structural sections have been removed, as well as the stainless steel sheeting on the side furthest from the ATC. This has exposed pretty much the whole side of the moving parts of the machine, as seen here:

    20170804_212230.jpg

    While placing the bolts and shim back in place from the front vertical member, I couldn't help but see a shiny end of an object that was well tucked out of sight from virtually all angles prior to removing that vertical HSS. Upon closer inspection it is in fact the linear glass scale for the X axis. This machine does have Heidenhain glass scales on all axis! I'm very pleased to make this discovery. It was said in a post here somewhere that all Deckel Maho machines came standard with glass scales and I felt like my machine unfortunately did not have them. Well it does, and they are well protected!

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  11. #27
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    After several more days (weeks) working on the Deckel Maho I thought I would post an update.

    Entire ATC dismantled, large thick steel backing plate removed from the machine: The ATC assembly on this machine weighs over 3 tons.

    20171005_170712.jpg

    Because the machine has been sitting a level of difficulty has been added by not moving any linear axis or ball screw until the machine is fully dismantled and the ways/screws properly cleaned. This has made the project much more difficult but in the long run it will likely save quite a bit of damage to the bearing blocks and ball nut assemblies.

    Next, entire APC (Automatic Pallet changer) removed. First I pulled the spare table and had no choice but to clean the vertical linear blocks in place due to the design of this assembly. The linear blocks are less critical in this assembly but it went well regardless. All hydraulic parts in perfect condition. I purchased the appropriate caps for the hydraulic fittings on the machine and plugged all lines as they were removed. Much easier to clean removed without worry of debris ingress into the hydraulic system. I especially worry about the Hydraulic valves as they require the utmost cleanliness at all times. Just about everything on this machine uses hydraulics rather than air to run.

    20171011_145109.jpg

    Next, all electrical was pulled from the main casting and tilt rotary trunnion assembly while the hydraulic lines were pulled into the casting from the rear cabinet assembly. The way the lines are routed this is the easiest approach. Once again, the Deckel Maho designers were really on the ball with the electrical design. All electrical to the machine is divided by section such as ATC, APC, Each axis, door switches and so forth. These have junction boxes that all the small wiring from that section runs to and then one large water proof quick release connector with a main cable that runs back to the cabinet. This makes removal of any major part very easy as the whole section will come off as a module. Very well thought out.

    Once a manual hydraulic pressure unit was assembled with a gauge and custom hose for the machine, the trunnion locks were released to allow manual tilting of the B axis and then removal of the rotary table access plates that are underneath the trunnion. Once removed the connections and hoses were removed, as well as all servo connections. Both Heidenhain rotary scales are accessible from the left panel that is shown removed in this photo:

    20171014_172018.jpg

    This allowed for complete detachment of the electrical cabinet assembly:

    20171017_165740.jpg

    More to follow...

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  13. #28
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    Next up - The Spindle. Much harder to deal with than a vertical machining center and not being able to move the ball screw or the blocks made it even more difficult. First the Spindle had to be held in position by placing a large bottle jack alongside the ball screw. Then the Ball screw was carefully removed from above and withdrawn from the machine. On this machine, all linear axis must have their ball screw removed before that axis casting (or spindle) can be removed. Many other machines have a cutout where the ball nut attaches to the axis to facilitate removal of that unit with the ball screw still in place, not so on this machine. This is particularly important in the event the Y Axis column needs to be removed. The ball screw cannot be removed from that axis with the electrical cabinets in place. If an owner of this machine didn't take the ballscrew service into account when they placed the machine, they may place it too close to a wall and not actually be able to remove the X axis ballscrew at all. This is the case where it sits now, I can partially remove it enough to remove the casting, but complete removal will wait until I get it to my shop.

    One interesting feature on the MC800H is the auto brake that is present on the Y axis (vertical axis). If the belt breaks a spring loaded follower simply engages with a splined ring attached directly to the Y axis ball screw. The screw will likely only rotate 20 to 30 degrees before the brake locks the screw from further motion. What an excellent feature! The Hitachi VS50 for example does NOT have this. Belt breaks and the spindle is going down hard.

    This brings me to yet another feature on the big Deckel Maho that I've never seen: Auto resetting torque limiters on all linear axis with urethane limit stop cushions. Because the machine relies on linear scales for feedback, the belt driven sprocket on the ball screw doesn't have to be absolutely in the same orientation relative to the screw for the machine to know where it is. If the machine hits something, the screw will automatically "pop" it's spring loaded balls internally that are in detents set to a specific torque. It rotates a preset amount and clicks back together, no harm done. The control likely can tell the servo has exceeded the rotation for the recorded linear movement to throw an alarm so the machine stops... no bent screws or wrecked bearings. The limit stops will absorb the motion of an axis if something goes seriously wrong and an axis decides to run past the limit switches. Very well thought out.

    20171019_134018.jpg

    Next the vertical Y axis casting. This was difficult to remove because of where it was sitting when it was stopped. As mentioned before, no ballscrew is to be turned or linear block moved until everything is properly cleaned and lubricated. The ball nut cannot be accessed directly due to how close the nut was to the drive end bearing assembly. Complete removal of all the end components including the bearing housing allowed access through the casting to the ball nut bolts. The banjo union connection to the nut was particularly difficult as there was only enough clearance to turn a wrench 15 degrees before flipping the wrench over. Very tedious, but at least it was possible.

    20171019_185622.jpg

    This is where the project is at now. Not much left, one more day and everything can be moved. It would be nice to keep the trunnion casting attached to prevent any chance of alignment issues later.

    20171019_191812.jpg

    Once moving is complete I will follow up with progress as the machine is thoroughly cleaned and rebuilt. Many small problems have already been found and some poor maintenance choices as well. One benefit of such an extensive job on the machine is catching all problems one by one as the entire machine is brought back to life. Once finished, the machine will be able to be powered up with a very minimal amount of potential issues lurking from past neglect. Performing maintenance on a machine fully dismantled is much easier too just due to accessibility. Much like comparing working on an engine in a car vs on an engine stand.

    Until next time.

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  15. #29
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    That is a lot of work, especially considering the standard of your last rebuild. Do you have any idea when you will be done ? Or how many hours you think you will use total ?
    I'm sure it will be good as new when you're done.

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    Hi Panza, I'm not sure when it will be finished, hopefully end of the year/early 2018.

    Once it is here I can work on it full time while I'm running my other machines so it will be easier to put in more hours per day.

    I don't know the total hours, I'm confident though that if I added them all up and multiplied that by shop rate I still would never come close to what it would cost to try to get a machine with the same specifications in the same condition this machine will be in when I've put in that time. Also it is nice to have intimate knowledge of the machine moving forward so I don't have to rely on DMG or an outside service tech to keep the machine going.

    Just a guess, I probably have 250 hours in so far? Taking the machine apart without causing any harm, bagging/marking everything, and just figuring out how certain assemblies need to come apart takes much more time than assembly. I will spend several hours cleaning and servicing as I put it back together but still I don't think I'm too far off the half way point. My large ultrasonic cleaner is handy because it can clean parts in labeled ziplock bags while I'm working on something else, all the while not getting grime on myself or breathing in cleaning fumes. Cleaning fasteners especially is dead simple and extremely effective with the unit.

    Upgrading the monitors to LCD's and making it all appear factory will add a little time as well as refurbishing that big coolant unit and chip conveyor.

    I'll be posting pics of the move later this week. I should have moved the trunnion and main casting by now but we had the F450 picker truck that was planned for the move stolen the night before. Ugh, thieves.

  17. #31
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    Bummer about the theft.

    Amazing machine to do such a project on. I feel seriously challenged by my little MH400E. You are in a totally other league there.

    I would love to see some photos of the electrical cabinet /cabinets.
    Mark

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  19. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milacron View Post
    not running....at HGR Surpus
    Isn't that redundant?

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    Further progress:

    The fixators (Adjustable wedge feet) came with an option to the have the bottom milled flat to attach to a sub steel plate. My feet were not milled but the drawings from Deckel Maho show that it is supposed to be mounted to plates? I get from this that the machine was never set according to the manufacturer's specifications. First it was necessary to mill the bottoms of the fixators flat as per the drawing from the supplier of the fixators themselves:

    20171117_020717.jpg

    This gave me a chance to try out an old 4 inch facemill I had sitting that came with my Hitachi. Worked awesome for this.

    Here is the before on the right, after on the left:

    20171117_021942.jpg

    Next up was the sub plates that attach below the fixators. Here is the recommendation from Deckel Maho:

    rkiii.jpg

    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing, so instead of the recommended 275mm (10.8") x 214mm (8.4") x 30mm (1.18") thick plates I went to 14" x 14" x 1.25" plates instead. They have much more area and should give me roughly 60 psi max on the floor when the machine isn't moving. Here is one of those plates being milled:

    20171116_210422.jpg

    Next onto giving the fixators some maintenance...

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    The fixators are thought to be maintenance free items but when I took them apart such was not the case!

    20171117_023924.jpg

    From the OE supplier these units have sliding parts coated with a special dry lubricant that contains molybdenum and graphite; Molykote D-321R. I sourced from one of my local bearing suppliers, quite expensive but I think worth it for this application.

    I had to use denatured alcohol to wash the old coating off the parts, all the other milder cleaners didn't make a difference to this coating. It is like paint, really slippery paint. The thrust bearings needed to be cleaned and repacked with grease, overall they were in good shape just a little bit of corrosion and didn't move as smoothly as they should. After cleaning and recoating they work like new.

    Next came prepping the floor for grouting the big plates down. My floor has a densified hard top layer so that was chipped away for the areas that would be grouted. Then the floor was dampened with wet rags for over 24 hours prior to pouring. I also matched drilled the holes for the 5/8 studs and used A7 Acrylic to fix them in place. Also the forms were prepared:

    20171121_020905.jpg

    The fixators have a very limited adjustment range so you have to get the machine pretty level when the feet are grouted. The fixators are for fine tuning with a precision level. Initially the plan was to grout the plates down using measuring devices and levels but instead the entire base casting was hoisted above the floor, the fixators and subplates attached to the casting and the entire assembly leveled in the air in position. This meant leveling the subplates and the main casting as well as aligning everything to the floor. Sounds easy enough, took longer than anticipated. For this setup it was good to do it all this way due to how much the floor was uneven. The grout thickness is 2" on one foot and as thin as 1" on another foot.

    After all this, the grout was mixed and poured. I used Sika 212 Non Shrink Precision grout. Here is some advice for anyone about to use the same stuff: First, be extra diligent about building the forms to be water tight. My first attempt at this one of my forms had a big leak and I decided to shovel everything out and do it over again before it cured, in hindsight that was a good choice, the grout itself is pretty inexpensive. Anyway, the second tip is to measure out your water for a full bag mix, and if you are only mixing a partial bag weigh out the powder and the water prior to mixing. Only a small amount of water changes the viscosity of the mix by a very large amount. The bag recommends 4.6L for a whole bag, and this produces a very pourable mix that is just about self leveling. It filled up the forms with ease and I had no issues, which was good because with the feet attached to the casting I can't get access to most of two sides of the forms. When I ran out of grout and needed to mix a partial bag, I went just a little light on water and it poured too thick. It wasn't obvious until pouring began but it wasn't flowing to the back of the forms and that created a big problem due to the limited access. Water was mixed in quickly and overall it went fine but if I were to do it all again I would mix by weight first like epoxy for composite work.

    After a few hours the fixators were detached from the main casting, the casting lifted, the forms knocked off and the edges finished at a taper from the plate to the floor. It looks pretty good so far! Now the grout is curing with some damp rags and polyethylene bags over the exposed surfaces to keep the moisture in and prevent it from drying out.

    20171122_234040.jpg

    Seems to be working well so far... a couple more days and I'll be bolting the MC800H down to her new home.

    Mark: I will send many shots of the electrical cabinets when I get to that point. I will be putting new caps in every drive prior to putting power to them so there will be plenty to see during that time. As for the stolen truck, it was recovered yet again! The owner of the truck was so tired of it disappearing from his yard that we struck a deal and now it's mine! That unit makes moving the parts for this project much easier: 04 F-450 Diesel 4x4 with a Hiab 035 Folding picker crane and a 10' flat deck behind that. I'm going to mod the electrical quite a bit on that truck to make stealing it very difficult and I will not be posting about it

    Dave

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  24. #35
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    Just a very quick update: Machine is fixed to the floor and now slowly coming back together! X axis casting has been installed, Y column has been cleaned as well as the spindle, pulled the spindle cartridge out and inspected the internals for any signs of corrosion.

    Before:

    20171005_180236.jpg

    After:

    20180108_164736.jpg

    I've been getting excellent support from the extremely helpful staff in DMG Germany, which brings me to some interesting numbers about the MC-800 series of machining centers:

    62 MC800's were built. They came with a few variations to the spindle and table. The "U" version had a spindle that could hydraulically swivel between vertical and horizontal, though it had to be locked in one of those positions so it couldn't be considered an axis like on the newer machines that followed it. Only 7 of these were ever made.

    Next we had the "V" vertical spindle version, which really was similar to another machine in their lineup so they only made 7 before stopping production of that variation.

    Last there is the "H", like the one I'm restoring. Of the 48 that were built, only 24 had the tilting rotary table and the other 24 had the B axis table (4 axis machine).

    I'm not sure how many were SK50 and SK40, SK50 was standard. Of all the various configurations, only 3 were brought to North America.

    Since my machine is being completely gone through I wanted to know if there are any really weak points of the design that I should look at while it is torn all down. They said the machine was very solid, the reason they didn't keep making it was because of the sheer expense of the design. I can believe this, this machine is built like a tank with all sorts of very clever features that are still quite rugged to protect the machine. Elastomeric end stops and the aformentioned auto resetting torque limiters on ALL axis as a start. Must have cost a fortune to build.

    Has anyone on this entire forum ever operated one of the various MC600 or MC800 machines?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerv View Post
    ...I've been getting excellent support from the extremely helpful staff in DMG Germany
    I would certainly hope so. There should be a shrine to you in the headquarters lobby.

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    How did it look inside the spindle ? Looked quite bad on the outside, but now it looks mint. Original paint came out great too.

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    THIS is one of the best threads ever in here.

    I myself know nothing about Mahos as such ..
    Your dedication, skills, openness, honesty and pics/docs are extremely appreciated.

    But seeing Your work, and the issues and-or mechanicals from the other MT builders, is a huge major major benefit for me at least.

    Fwiw..
    I used to do IT refits on expensive equipment in the pro industrial tv/movie/video areas for processor boards etc.
    In the 386/486 times, and ongoing.

    A system might have cost 200k$ in 1990, for example, and I refit the system with a new HDD or main processor board, making for 20x better results in start-up times or 3x better productivity at 300$ / hr in 1996 or so.

    Or fixing a high end (movie/industrial) frame-grab recorder to be 10x more productive, via a sw process I wrote.

    - (I brute forced the sw via a VB sw script, since it was not reliable over multiple frames.
    Simply ran 1-n frames, killed it, re-started it.
    I used simple silly perfectly reliable sendkeys commands in windows, with some dumb delays (in ms) to allow action.
    Basically ran the sw via menu/kb emulation.)

    Probably all or almost all of your sw and systems would run on more modern hw and processors.
    Imho .. based on a lot of experience.

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    OldWrench,

    I think the guys at DMG do not really know how extensive of a go through I'm doing here. I love talking about the machine with the guys from Germany direct because they were actually involved with it and seem to be the only ones who even know about them anymore.

    Panza,

    Thanks for your feedback! I'm shocked by how well the paint is coming back. I think it is partially due to the way I'm cleaning it. I have this specific type of scotchbrite-like 3M pad (white colour) that is very mild that doesn't really scratch the paint, I use it to clean semi precision parts with WD-40 in it, and painted parts with Windex in it. The fumes are much more tolerable this way than many of the other cleaners I've used and the results are great. It is also fast. It is excellent at cleaning hoses and cables because it holds the cleaner without wicking it away like a cloth does. On high precision surfaces I'm using brass only with WD40 and lower precision steel a low abrasive scotchbrite (green) and the really rusted areas I touch with agressive scotchbrite (brown). I read into them and these pads are all made from different ceramic or oxide abrasives. I have experimented with almost every cleaning approach imaginable over the years with restorations and this is what I use now. Acids are horrible, though I still use heated phosphoric pumped through rusted coolant systems. Methylene Chloride is great if you want to kill yourself, very hard to get out of seams afterward. I could go on and on... My ultrasonic is great for certain things with Simple Green HD, great for precision parts.

    The internals of the spindle were quite good, the taper I touched with brass and it only has very minor staining. The special grease needed for the drawbar is on it's way now from Kluber. The high pressure swivel coupling at the rear of the spindle however is bad news through and through. I'll see if I can save the ceramic/carbide sealing surfaces and replace everything else, but as of now it is all seized solid. I know that is a very expensive part because of the brand (Glyco), I'm not sure if Dueblin makes a replacement or not, they seem to be a little less costly and can be sourced from over on this side of the pond. The coupling for my other machine was quite reasonable compared to the numbers I'm seeing from Glyco.

    Hanermo,

    Thank you as well. I am very interested to hear your take on this. I have been asking Heidenhain this very question.

    The VME based EPC-8 CPU card in my control has a 486 DX2/50 Mhz processor. My limited understanding is that once processors went from 32 bit to 64 bit data bus with the advent of Pentium architecture the software would need much more work to properly function on the newer computer. Once the jump to 64 bit data bus is complete I can upgrade to a pretty new computer, providing it still can run DOS and the BIOS is setup to still use the memory as it was originally laid out. Having said that, upgrading the software (or perhaps just drivers?) to use a more modern setup so I don't have to use the battery backed SRAM card as a HDD would probably be nice too. Perhaps the machine could be configured to load all the previously SRAM data into volatile ram upon startup so there are no access speed bottlenecks? I would love to be able to save my parameters (constants) to the actual HDD so they are not volatile. If the machine could be setup to save all volatile data to the HDD on shutdown and reload on startup, the worry about losing data at all would be greatly reduced. Once again, your thoughts on this are appreciated.

    Obviously the response rate of the servo loop will not change as these boards are seperate in the VME computer, but honestly I don't have a problem with the numbers I'm seeing for the machine's max feedrates and servo loop, I'm more concerned about the rate at which the control can process code for detailed contouring work. Almost all I do is contoured surfacing and I don't want to get bogged down by the control. My Pentium based Fanuc 18i machines do not have any problems keeping up (They have HPCC). I also do not wish to dripfeed at all.

    For all I know Philips was able to get the 532 control quite efficient and it will do all I need as is? Just going through the list of all the features my control is setup with let alone the elaborate PLC that was developed for it makes me wonder why anyone would want to do a "PC" retrofit? The only way I will consider a retrofit on this machine is with a new Heidenhain control. Anything else would be a step backward.


    Dave

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    All the intel processors are backward compatible.
    More/less all roms / eproms are as well.

    1. It is probable the machine could load the sw from a sdd modern solid state hard disk drive ..
    2. This might require upgrading the main board, typically cheap.

    Both 1. and 2. are potentially complex.
    The right way is to clone them, then work on secondary hw binaries only.

    Often the old bios wont see/use/recognise new sdd drives..
    but a tiny linux utility can change the drive descriptor parameter in the primary hdd fields, and it then works perfectly.
    This has to do with lots of historical stuff..

    A new fast board will work just fine as a new faster 32-bit board vs the old one.
    An SDD drive will be a major benefit.
    Since your setup probably uses no (does it ?) custom IO boards, most/any new motherboard will likely work fine.

    Using suitable cloning sw, the current HDD can be cloned onto a modern SSD.
    It will be vastly better, because of the file access latency being 100x less.

    --
    You will not get 64 bit performance.
    This is immaterial for Your use.
    You can get *fast* 32 bit performance and **fast** hard drive via SSD.

    The SSD is about 100x more important than You probably can imagine.
    Really.

    ((64 bit needs specific sw for it.))

    I think, and have understood, usually parameters for the machines are on battery backed sram and cannot be changed.
    If it is possible to change the drive/address then using a new drive should be possible.
    Changing a binary assignment in memory, and then writing it onto a drive, is not that hard.
    I/We first did that in 1987, +/-, on CP/M stuff.

    Hth..


    Quote Originally Posted by Nerv View Post

    Hanermo,

    Thank you as well. I am very interested to hear your take on this. I have been asking Heidenhain this very question.

    The VME based EPC-8 CPU card in my control has a 486 DX2/50 Mhz processor. My limited understanding is that once processors went from 32 bit to 64 bit data bus with the advent of Pentium architecture the software would need much more work to properly function on the newer computer. Once the jump to 64 bit data bus is complete I can upgrade to a pretty new computer, providing it still can run DOS and the BIOS is setup to still use the memory as it was originally laid out. Having said that, upgrading the software (or perhaps just drivers?) to use a more modern setup so I don't have to use the battery backed SRAM card as a HDD would probably be nice too. Perhaps the machine could be configured to load all the previously SRAM data into volatile ram upon startup so there are no access speed bottlenecks? I would love to be able to save my parameters (constants) to the actual HDD so they are not volatile. If the machine could be setup to save all volatile data to the HDD on shutdown and reload on startup, the worry about losing data at all would be greatly reduced. Once again, your thoughts on this are appreciated.

    Obviously the response rate of the servo loop will not change as these boards are seperate in the VME computer, but honestly I don't have a problem with the numbers I'm seeing for the machine's max feedrates and servo loop, I'm more concerned about the rate at which the control can process code for detailed contouring work. Almost all I do is contoured surfacing and I don't want to get bogged down by the control. My Pentium based Fanuc 18i machines do not have any problems keeping up (They have HPCC). I also do not wish to dripfeed at all.

    For all I know Philips was able to get the 532 control quite efficient and it will do all I need as is? Just going through the list of all the features my control is setup with let alone the elaborate PLC that was developed for it makes me wonder why anyone would want to do a "PC" retrofit? The only way I will consider a retrofit on this machine is with a new Heidenhain control. Anything else would be a step backward.


    Dave


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