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  1. #81
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    ...and some photos as I've been progressing through... painted surfaces cleaning up well.

    20191006_033530.jpg

    Linear bearings cleaned, repacked with grease and rods cleaned up as well as I can really hope for. Slides very smoothly now.

    20191006_033613.jpg

    Quite a bit more work still needed on the sliding gripper assembly, I'll post more as I go through it. It is nice that the cylinders are all hydraulic and that the hydraulic system was still closed when I started. I mentioned earlier that I invested in new caps to plug each fitting as I took it apart and I'm glad I did because I don't have to deal with corrosion on any of the cylinders, especially the ones that were in the retracted position which almost all of them were.

    More to follow in the next few days.

    [email protected]

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  3. #82
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    An update on the MC800H and the SL6B. Been working on both every day since my last post. The Mori is at my bay where I'm doing a run of long cycle parts so I'm working on it while machining. The MC800H is still at my home shop so I put in a few hours every evening as time allows.

    Mori SL6B:

    I've been still fighting the urge to repaint everything vs just the castings and paneling (Which are already done). The rear of the machine's paint is in pretty good shape so repainting is really only an aesthetic exercise at this point. I may opt for plan C where I build a booth over the machine and spray just the cabinets without removing them from the machine. I know I said I could never paint a machine without taking it apart but I usually don't paint inside the electrical cabinets anyway. This approach would be a good compromise between cost/time and appearance. Anyway, some photos of actual progress:

    20191010_183347.jpg

    I've removed the sliding tailstock base completely now and quite a bit more of the paint has been removed from the base casting.

    I removed the self contained pneumatic chuck...

    20191011_182106.jpg

    I'm pleased to report the special seals used to transfer air from the fixed ring to the chuck are in perfect condition. Everything will need to be cleaned but there is virtually no corrosion or damage of any kind which is a relief since replacement of that chuck would be very expensive.

    I will be completely dismantling that chuck to clean and lubricate its internals. I question the quality of the air that was used in the previous shop(s) where this machine was used so cleaning it and all the air system components gives me a great known starting point. As with the large Maho, I never even applied power to this machine before I pulled it apart. Trying to do anything with a machine that has sat for a long time, especially with some of that time outside will almost certainly do completely unnecessary damage...

    20191011_182215.jpg

    Here you can see the chuck and the stationary air ring removed as well as additional surface prep on the castings. Next I'm going to remove the sliding carriage assembly to inspect the turcite and remove old lubricant as well as any chips or debris that managed to get in there. At the same time I can closely inspect the condition of the way wiper lips. There is quite a bit of work yet to do on the Mori but besides general neglect there is nothing that can't still be in usable condition with a little care. I am concerned about the main spindle gearbox, that might have some issues as well as the internals of the turret and it's curvic coupling. I'll cover that soon.

    As for the Deckel Maho.... (Please see my next post)

  4. #83
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    The progress on the Maho has been unfortunately slow. When an assembly starts to become difficult when coming apart that is a good time to stop and give real thought as to how to proceed without damaging anything, so far I'm managed to stay patient enough to "do no harm".

    The sliding arm bearing in particular has been tricky. I acquired another puller and made some collars to get the end bearings removed so I could finally pull the shaft out. After that I was able to remove the shaft from the bearing and get it largely cleaned but the motion still wasn't smooth enough. I took the arm to my press and removed the recirculating bearing itself to see if there were any set screws which are accessed from the outside of the bearing that would prevent me from removing the ball guides.

    Turns out this is a THK Ball screw spline, one of the few Japanese made parts I've found on the machine:

    thk_ball_spline.jpg

    I've removed the seals and will be ultrasonically cleaning the bearing once I manage to get the retainer out. I've found a replacement for not all that much money in the event this one cannot be properly refurbished which is a relief. On Monday I'll call my local supplier and see what they are new.

    I don't think the shaft is in bad enough shape to warrant getting another one made from a THK supplied shaft. I've been toying with the idea of taking the shafts to get DLC coated to help prevent further issues down the road but that might be overkill as this machine will always be well serviced from this point onward, at least as long as I own it anyway.

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  6. #84
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    Update on that ball spline assembly:

    The ball retainer inside the unit cannot be removed without damaging it. THK uses a permanent adhesive to assemble both parts of the retainer. After several attempts to try to get it apart I decided it wasn't worth damaging it so I cleaned the internals as much as possible and reassembled with fresh grease. It works pretty smoothly now.

    I assumed taking the pivoting arm assembly apart would be simple enough but I didn't realize there were quite a few hidden parts within that made the whole assembly a bit more complicated. After trying several approaches to get it to come apart I found the tool holder alignment lugs could be pulled from the end of the unit which allowed for a custom small puller to be made and used to separate the aluminum casting from the steel backing plates.

    20191014_110525.jpg

    Inside each side of the arm are a pair of fingers which can only be opened when a spring loaded pin/wedge unit is pressed from the side of the arm. This automatically happens when the arm is in the position of grabbing or releasing a tool. The advantage of this of course is that the tool cannot come out of the arm when it is not inserted in the spindle or tool changer.

    In the past this entire unit had the magnetic pickups for each linear movement set a little off I think, at least a couple of them. There has been minor markings on the ATC from when the arm tried to move when it shouldn't have been able to be given that instruction. One plate that retains the springs for the finger release wedge is actually damaged as part of it was ripped clean off (The plate can be seen in the middle of the picture above). I'll be making a new plate that will be either thicker or add another countersunk screw to hold it down so it can't lift and catch again resulting in the same damage.

    This is half way through the cleaning process:

    20191014_140053.jpg

    It is good to take the time to learn how each component is assembled and intended to function to aid in future maintenance when it is in use. Although this assembly will not require much maintenance it certainly will need a little TLC from time to time just to make sure no coolant has washed out the lubricant and started to cause problems. I'm confident the arm has never been apart since the machine was new.

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  8. #85
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    I'm curious as to your cleaning methods and equipment. It always seems that cleaning represents a significant portion of the time required on a rebuild project like this.

  9. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    I'm curious as to your cleaning methods and equipment. It always seems that cleaning represents a significant portion of the time required on a rebuild project like this.
    Please see post 39 in this thread.

    The cleaning process on the MC800H is almost all of the time spent, made worse by the fact I'm trying to make it as close to new condition as possible without resorting to part or paint replacement. Some parts will be replaced and other parts will be repainted but I'm trying to minimize this.

    Today finally I completed the disassembly of the large sliding arm. It required some heat with a torch to remove the final stubborn key that was pressed into a hard to access ground shaft and I'm very pleased nothing was nicked or otherwise damaged in the process. There have been several parts found that would have contributed to ATC problems which makes the effort feel that much more worthwhile.

    20191017_012812.jpg

    arm_clean1.jpg

    On the Mori cleaning is becoming a balance between removing any corrosion/sludge/chips and actually removing the paint right down to the castings for repainting. I made great progress on the the Mori today and hopefully the Z axis saddle/ X axis slide assembly will be removed tomorrow.

    20191016_182020.jpg

    20191016_181918.jpg

    It is interesting to note that the Z travel on the Mori is restricted only by parameters, not mechanically (The ball screw has threading right until the box ways end). Because the chuck is so large (Z depth) the travel is reduced to prevent the turret from hitting the chuck body. For the work I do I'm seriously considering putting on a large diameter 4 jaw manual chuck which would be much "thinner" and increasing the travel to suit. I would much prefer the extra grip and adjustability as well as peace of mind of the 4 jaw over the faster self contained air chuck. We'll see what happens... I would love to hear what others think. I will be using this machine for API threading up to 16" material and larger solid round bar.

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  11. #87
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    If you are not doing a bunch of the same parts then a manual 4 jaw makes sense to me.

  12. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerv View Post
    Please see post 39 in this thread.

    The cleaning process on the MC800H is almost all of the time spent, made worse by the fact I'm trying to make it as close to new condition as possible without resorting to part or paint replacement. Some parts will be replaced and other parts will be repainted but I'm trying to minimize this.
    Thanks! Ditto that on time spent....

  13. #89
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    This message is for "hanermo" who has a full inbox at the moment...

    You mentioned early in this thread that you have experience with old school computer challenges like what I'm dealing with in regards to the VME-based control on the MC800H I'm restoring.

    I have that same control on my DMU50V and I'm trying to get away from the HDD it has now to get something more SSD. I read about items like this:

    Transcend 8GB IDE PATA 2.5" SLC Internal Solid State Drive SSD Model TS8GPSD520 - Newegg.com

    and this:

    YouTube

    and I wanted to get your feedback. I also found some VME blades that have large SSD's too:

    VME SAS/SATA Solid State Disk Module | Phoenix International

    I don't need large internal data, I just want fast rear/write access if possible to improve performance during boot, loading and switching between modes. My main worry is getting the DOS based computer with it's old BIOS to recognize one of these options. Any feedback you have on this would be awesome. If it worked for the other MC800H too that would also be great since that memory is battery backed and I would prefer something that can't "die" per se. Then again, with a backup copy I prefer the fastest possible solution so maybe that EXM-2A Solid state card isn't a bad choice? It makes me wonder if I could "downgrade" from the HDD in my DMU to using the same EXM-2A. Less memory for programs (Which I don't use, I drip feed everything always) but faster performance?

    Obviously anyone that has feedback on this is welcome to put forth their ideas.

  14. #90
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    Make sure you make a copy/mirror of the HDD, one day it will go faulty and then you have a real problem.It contains among other software the unique parameters, PLC program and motorlist.

    A SSD wil not make your machine faster , the controller has a 386 or 486 processor and that sets the limit. A SSD however would be far more reliable but complex to get it running on the old VME controller


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