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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveKamp View Post
    Making adjustments to motion control is what G-code is for. If the gantry cut fine using the 'old technology', and the 'new technology' can't cut as well as the 'old technology', then there's clearly something wrong with 'new'. It's a torch... there's a hundred-something volts at 80A coming TO it, and once burning, it will cut, and it'll do it a whole lot better, and a whole lot faster than my oxy-acetylene kit can freehand. It doesn't make a bit of difference wether the torch is in my hand, or on an old gantry, or a new one, it does what it does just the same.



    It's just a connector, and I have connectors, and a soldering iron... no fear of working with either.
    Fools rush in....your on your own....I'm done trying to help you.

  2. #22
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    sounds like a hobby type app, where the number one concern is low cost. In which case, it should work. Many of us here make lots of parts, and have lots of expenses, and actually need to turn a profit on the job- hence, we pay lots of money for reliable machines that work when you push the button, or, better yet, when an employee pushes the button.

    In that case, there isnt much of a way around doing it "right", which usually means spending money.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    sounds like a hobby type app, where the number one concern is low cost. In which case, it should work. Many of us here make lots of parts, and have lots of expenses, and actually need to turn a profit on the job- hence, we pay lots of money for reliable machines that work when you push the button, or, better yet, when an employee pushes the button.

    In that case, there isnt much of a way around doing it "right", which usually means spending money.

    This is certainly my case. If I were in business, I'd have 30,000 sqft of heated, lighted, varmint and insect-exclusive building, with one part dedicated to 'dirty' operations, and the other side dedicated to 'clean', and my back lot would be fully paved 8" thick so my forklifts were never at risk of getting stuck. I'd be investing 750k on a laser, and running a dozen tons of sheet through it a month... but I'm not.

    This is my hobby shop... a 5 acre farmstead with one 150 year-old dairy barn housing my woodworking shop, one grainery building that will soon be home to this CNC gantry, and two old pole-buildings that are in process of getting replaced by a pair of steel-framed workshop buildings with 10" thick insulated, heated concrete floors, ample lighting, and a 6 ton overhead bridge crane traversing the south wing, and a 10t overhead bridge crane traversing the west. When done, one part of the south wing will have three horizontal mills, a steptoe shaper, two vertical mills, three engine lathes, one second-op lathe, and eventually a VTL. At the north end, I'll have my CNC universal mill, and probably add a CNC swiss lathe. The far south end will be the 'dirty' end, where my surface grinders and other abrasive activity will occur, and there'll be a movable partition with the gantry on the other side, and my welding will be at the south end. along the 'back' side of the gantry area.

    I realize that it doesn't sound like the average 'hobby' shop, but that's what my category of 'hobby' requires. I use my shop to repair and restore, prototype and sometime do a short run of 'small' manufacturing when I see the need to do so. It is NOT a profit-intended endeavour, things I do for others are often compensated, and enough to help pay for what it costs me to have, but my shop is simply a very large, but very flexible toolbox that gives me the ability to make things happen on my own terms.

    The gantry will servie as many non-plasma purposes, as it will serve plasma... perhaps more. In it's previous life, it produced millions of tons of parts used on everything from HVAC ductwork to Humvee armor, to John Deere harvesting machines and most recently, components for the new bridge being built across the Mississippi here. It went into operation in '85 as the only CNC machine in the shop... it rapidly overtook the pattern-following flame-cutting table, and around 2006 was joined by a Trumpf laser. Recently, a Makino fiber machine showed up, and this area of their shop was converted to raw-material handling... and I happened to be in the right place, at the right time. They finished cutting the last batch of parts from some 3/4" plate (happened to be an order that I had cut for my company) and the slag in the table was still warm when I shut down the system and disconnected the power.

    So the short story, is that my wife really wanted a yard-moose.... the flat steel moose. The size she wants is about $400. Think I can burn one for less? Yeah, I do. I can also cut 84 gussets and 20 splice plates, 200 angle plates and a bunch of other pieces for the trusses of my south wing a whole lot quicker and cheaper than using a pair of gas bottles. If they need a little cleanup with the flapper-disk, so be it.

  4. #24
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    Let me know your preferred brand of flap discs so i can get shares in that company, sure doug will join me, we might as well befit from your love of grinding :-)

    Seriously good luck, im sure it will be awsome on thick stuff, just clean the dust up if you plan to rout wood and such before switching to plasma cutting metal, even if it has a dust extraction unit, a fire in one in like a blast furnace.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Thats just it, the NEW tech does not work slowly, the NEW tech confines the plasma jet tighter, this makes it significantly hotter, this heat melts the shit out of the edges of your work piece causing you rework if you don't move it fast enough. Optimal travel speed is the number one deciding factor in edge quality with plasma cutting. Please under stand were stressing this, not to make you spend more, or to show off, but so that you don't repeat the mistakes of others, your free to do what ever you wish, but if you don't want to spend the rest of your life grinding your cut parts you would do real well to hear us out. This is not shitting on you for running something old, this is a problem that has caught a lot of other people out and has significant real world costs associated with putting right something that can simply be minimized from the start.
    I entirely understand that, and I'll have to take that into account at every step in the future, but those aren't insurmountable problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Accelerating correctly and fast enough is what lets you plasma in near drilled hole quality holes in sub 1/2" materials, please do some more reading on this, it matters and it will let you cut better parts and save you a lot of work in the future.
    When you get the hand torch running have a play and see how travel speed affects the cut, then maybe you will understand - believe us.
    Frankly, it will be rare that I'd need drilling-quality results in anything that small, but I've already seen plenty of what this system AS_IS has done... if the jet is hotter, I'll find a way to make it work.

    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    FYI hope you have north of 40 amps single phase supply to run that thing on single phase, to the best of my knowledge no one commercially offers a single phase plasma at a true 80 amps output.
    As far as 'current' product is concerned, there's probably not many, but this supply is no spring chicken. The PAK1000XR was shipped from factory with single-phase 230 available at the connections inside. I've got well over 200A available on my shop supply... but for this machine, I doubt I will need more than a 50A range plug will endure. OCV 250, with 80A at 115v and 70% duty cycle. It's only gonna pull 8.5kw or so, which is well below the 12kw available at 240v/50A. If I get a serious need to go mobile, I have a 4-cylinder 20kw engine-driven generator that'll feed it single or three phase, too.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Let me know your preferred brand of flap discs so i can get shares in that company, sure doug will join me, we might as well befit from your love of grinding :-)

    Seriously good luck, im sure it will be awsome on thick stuff, just clean the dust up if you plan to rout wood and such before switching to plasma cutting metal, even if it has a dust extraction unit, a fire in one in like a blast furnace.
    I'm no stranger to grinding- With exception of a few things I've had my laser shop guy cut for me, everything I've built in the past was restricted to non-robotic techniques... gas torch and lots of flap disks... if you already own stock an ANY abrasive company, I've already bought you plenty of beer. No matter how THIS system turns out, I know I'll be doing better, faster, and with less work after, than I've had to do in the past. If I need really, really, really good quality, I'll just send the DXF to my guys across the river and have them illuminate the raw materials with their toys... my stuff won't be that critical.

    I imagine I'll have plenty of iron and aluminum to mix with wood and plastic to make some really scary stuff. Since I've got two tables, I'll be reserving one for plasma, the other for routing, specifically for the reason you've stated. Nicely, they're downdraft, and I've got a really, really big blower (from one of my grain drying bins) that will be serving as the motivation for my fume extraction (the entire 'dirty' side of the shop) as well as paint-booth that'll be in one of those same grain bins... and as a bonus, I'll be applying the experience of shoveling slag out of these two tables (20+ years of it) to the slag/dust management design... perhaps even using one of the old sweep augers (from the grain bins) to pull the spoils out into sensible containers... we shall see.


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