which angle grinder should I buy? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I buy Metabo (German ones) and have a bunch of them. I love them for ergonomics and they have a safety clutch that can save you.

    Recently though we got a production job and I used a Milwaukee for it...it's smaller size was much better for the particular job.

    Milwaukee is made in China now and I don't know how long it will last... Used to be Milwaukee tools were noticeably higher quality, IMO.

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    I have a Mkita 5" (and a 9") and a Walter "Duron 5". I highly recommend the Walter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jshel2000 View Post
    I think it's made to run slower spinning 6in discs. . .
    You are quite correct. The issue for me is that I often need to use a 4 1/2" disk or flap wheel to get into a tight spot, and 9,000 RPM or less is way to slow for my taste! The one I got can accept 5" wheels and for me that is a good compromise. It is very powerful too, I haven't been able to lug it down at all! The guard is a bit deep for my taste so I am going to slim it down a bit.

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    I have Metabo and Makita and like both. I like the Metabo quick change feature. There's a drop pin to instantly stop the spindle and a special nut that loosens one turn so you can remove it by hand. Works good for me. My metabo is noisier than my makita. I don't know if the Metabo I have was made in China or not. It wasn't the cheapest model when I bought it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Honestly you guys shouting metabo want to try the makitas there so much better and cheaper it will make you sick and this is coming from some one that has both and use to be a metabo fan boy too. Every single metabo grinder i have been around owned or used is worse than a makita and cost more. Weather that be std 4 1/2" or 9" or even wet stone grinders, im sorry but i will never buy another metabo again. The metabo's all vibrate more, all make more noise and all wear out faster than the makitas.

    My metabo vari speed 5" has a wire cup brush sees ocasional use now and thats it, its just too loud and too much vibration to use all the time. The metabo wet stone grinder is still awaiting reassembly after braking its spindle polishing the concrete front door step, metabo took 3 weeks getting me a replacment spindle, that does not cut it for a industrial tool in my book hence i went out and bought the makita the metabo was not dropped, was not beaten on. The Makita that replaced it runs so much quieter, is more powerful despite being the same physical size and weight and unlike the metabo it does not over heat at the lower half of its speed range. Its ground over 300 square feet or concrete to mirror polish and then some! Unlike the metabo that failed after just 100 square feet of work! Equally unlike the metabo it is sealed and waterproof, a key feature for a wet grinder so its not zapping the shit out of you all the time.

    I even have a straight electric die grinder from metabo because i use to rate there stuff and buy only there power tools, even that runs worse than a friends makita with damn near identical speed range and power. Like for like the only metabo thing i have that i have not found a better version of and thats the 18V metabo cordless drill, that things a monster and whilst it now occasionally jumps out of gear, its had a hard life and owes me nothing, no other cordless drill 3 years back even came close torque wise, which was the reason i got it as i had a onsite job running large step drills in sheet metal and it was a ungodly number of holes and i wanted cordless do to the location!

    As to dewalt grinders, i don't know if its only the low end ones i have seen, but there all pretty cheap and nasty IME and the brush holders are plastic not metal.
    My issue with Makita is really nit-picky, but none of their high end stuff uses a rat tail/trigger grip. I just don't like that style of grinder. They do make a couple trigger grips which I posted above (because I do know that they are built like tanks) but they are about 2.5 amps weaker than the other grinders I'm looking at. I don't know how much of a real-world difference that'd be, and hopefully you could fill me in, because that's the only thing keeping me away from the Makita.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Heaton View Post
    You are quite correct. The issue for me is that I often need to use a 4 1/2" disk or flap wheel to get into a tight spot, and 9,000 RPM or less is way to slow for my taste! The one I got can accept 5" wheels and for me that is a good compromise. It is very powerful too, I haven't been able to lug it down at all! The guard is a bit deep for my taste so I am going to slim it down a bit.
    I think I may be converting to buying a 4.5 inch or 5 inch grinder. I was mainly worried about heat, but the more I think about it, I don't think it would be that much of an issue. Also, I am not going into very tight spaces, it's almost always cleaning up welds on the outside of a steel frame, so I am fine with the longer grinder.

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    The metabo is similar to some branded as Bosch. What I like about those German ones is first when the brushes wear down they shut down the machine to prevent arcing damage. Second some of the models have a safety clutch system or ones I ran would just plane shut down if you overloaded the motor. You had to lift the disc and wait for the motor to restart. Third the guards and disc mounting varies but on a lot of machines no wrench is required. The nut is knurled and loosens by hand.
    Most of these small machines are damaged by people overloading them causing the armatures to overheat. The other major damage is with the commutator arcing from badly worn brushes. If you want any small tool to last run it at full speed unloaded for about ten seconds before you set it down. That extra air cools off the armature and prevents residual heat from building up after use and cooking the armature windings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jshel2000 View Post
    looking on amazon right now. To be honest, not that it's fein's fault, the product page is kind of sketchy, and another one had a review that said they didn't get the rat tail model.
    Fein seems to be under-represented in US and Metabo/walter over-hyped.

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    Let’s go another way. Long ago the kids and the thieves ended my high end grinder collection. The H F china tool store sells 4.5 inch grinders for 10 to 12 dollars on sale. I did the unthinkable and bought one. It worked so I bought another and another etc. For 15 or so years they have given great service and were as close to free as you’re going to get. Take a hundred dollars of your hard earned money and buy 5 or so of them. Use your change to outfit each grinder with a different wheel, grinding, flap, cut and an assortment of wire wheels. You will not believe how productive you will become and all for about 100 dollars.
    A lot of grinding is to dress welds. If this is the case, I would suggest that a welding class or at least some practice with a good hand may do wonders to reduce time with the grinders. A high bead profile is common for MIG, welding down hill helps flatten beads, but watch to ensure you have adequate penetration. A TIG welder will cut grinding time to almost zero.
    Best of luck, Mike

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  13. #30
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    I've used all of those grinders you listed, as well as the feins. My preference is the makita for flap disc, a metabo 6" for cutoff disc, and that's it. For grinding, get a 9" and get it done. I like the 7 for the wire wheel. If it's finer than the 7, I'll occasionally run a 4 1/2, but usually have to go to die grinder(metabo).

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    Almost forgot....Fein went to shit when they lowered their prices a couple years ago.

    I saw bearings burned out in 4 1/2" grinders that were less than 6 months old....meanwhile, there was also a 6" fein that had been going at the same rate for years.

    They went from a black coated metal to a die cast gearbox and the quality seemed to go to shit.

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    I like the DeWalt, I have several as I do not like changing the disks.
    I just purchased two of the 60v cordless and they are the greatest, work just as well as a corded grinder. A little over your price point but by far nicer to not have to deal with the cord.

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    Quote Originally Posted by snowman View Post
    Almost forgot....Fein went to shit when they lowered their prices a couple years ago.

    I saw bearings burned out in 4 1/2" grinders that were less than 6 months old....meanwhile, there was also a 6" fein that had been going at the same rate for years.

    They went from a black coated metal to a die cast gearbox and the quality seemed to go to shit.
    Thats what I was affraid to hear, my experience is only from the older ones when they still painted them..

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    Quote Originally Posted by jshel2000 View Post
    My issue with Makita is really nit-picky, but none of their high end stuff uses a rat tail/trigger grip. I just don't like that style of grinder. They do make a couple trigger grips which I posted above (because I do know that they are built like tanks) but they are about 2.5 amps weaker than the other grinders I'm looking at. I don't know how much of a real-world difference that'd be, and hopefully you could fill me in, because that's the only thing keeping me away from the Makita.
    Can't comment on switch style, me i prefer a switch to a trigger. As to the 2.5 amps weaker, IMHO you need to try one, can not stress enough i have never encountered a makita with a real world lack of power. The only 2 i have been able to directly compare is the so called wet grinder - stone polisher as i have both from each brand and there directly comparable. Its basically a low variable speed angle grinder with a water feed through the spindle. Metabo is rated at 9.6 amps makita is rated at 7.9 amps. Ergo 1.7 amps less to the makita hence rightly so you expect less performance right? Unlike a angle grinder a wet polisher you use the whole face of the disc onto the work, hence torque needs are a lot higher. The metabo has a over heat protection feature and if your grinding more than about a square yard's worth of surface expect it to kick in, lower speeds it stalls out easily and the overheating is noticeably worse at the lower half of the speed range. Despite the less amperage the makita gets the job done, never gets warm at any speed and is smoother and damn near impossible to stall at any speed. I use to hate wet grinding with the metabo, it made it a serious vibrateing electrifying chore, now with the makita, its just the crawling around on me knees that i hate about the job!

    Above all when it comes to angle grinders and metal, you need to spend the money on consumables, buy the good ones and the results are good, splash the cash on something like 3m Cubitron abrasives, weather that be discs, wheels or flap discs and productivity will go through the roof. If your grinders stalling out either it has a problem or your using too much pressure or far more likely shitty consumables are loading up - going blunt and not cutting worth a damn. Dressing off single pass weld beads should not be a struggle with even a small 700+ real world watts Bosch, makita or metabo grinder. If it is, look at your consumables, because whilst a bigger grinders always better - faster, something is wrong with the abrasives if that is causing you a issue. The so called ceramic - synthetic abrasives are well worth the slight extra cost, give them a go if you have not done so and im not trying to be a sales rep, its a night and day diffrence.

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  19. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Can't comment on switch style, me i prefer a switch to a trigger. As to the 2.5 amps weaker, IMHO you need to try one, can not stress enough i have never encountered a makita with a real world lack of power. The only 2 i have been able to directly compare is the so called wet grinder - stone polisher as i have both from each brand and there directly comparable. Its basically a low variable speed angle grinder with a water feed through the spindle. Metabo is rated at 9.6 amps makita is rated at 7.9 amps. Ergo 1.7 amps less to the makita hence rightly so you expect less performance right? Unlike a angle grinder a wet polisher you use the whole face of the disc onto the work, hence torque needs are a lot higher. The metabo has a over heat protection feature and if your grinding more than about a square yard's worth of surface expect it to kick in, lower speeds it stalls out easily and the overheating is noticeably worse at the lower half of the speed range. Despite the less amperage the makita gets the job done, never gets warm at any speed and is smoother and damn near impossible to stall at any speed. I use to hate wet grinding with the metabo, it made it a serious vibrateing electrifying chore, now with the makita, its just the crawling around on me knees that i hate about the job!

    Above all when it comes to angle grinders and metal, you need to spend the money on consumables, buy the good ones and the results are good, splash the cash on something like 3m Cubitron abrasives, weather that be discs, wheels or flap discs and productivity will go through the roof. If your grinders stalling out either it has a problem or your using too much pressure or far more likely shitty consumables are loading up - going blunt and not cutting worth a damn. Dressing off single pass weld beads should not be a struggle with even a small 700+ real world watts Bosch, makita or metabo grinder. If it is, look at your consumables, because whilst a bigger grinders always better - faster, something is wrong with the abrasives if that is causing you a issue. The so called ceramic - synthetic abrasives are well worth the slight extra cost, give them a go if you have not done so and im not trying to be a sales rep, its a night and day diffrence.
    the unfortunate scenario that I'm in, why I made an account and posted on this forum, is that the only angle grinders I can test out are shitty cordless grinders and one Milwaukee paddle switch grinder that I hate (because it's a paddle switch). I'll probably ask around the forum more to see how much 2.5 amps makes a difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jshel2000 View Post
    I'll probably ask around the forum more to see how much 2.5 amps makes a difference.
    That is like selecting cars by how MUCH gasoline they use per mile. More is not necessarily better but there may or may not be some correlation.
    Bosch is one of the few that specify actual OUTPUT power. Electric heaters have also 15 amps input but it still sucks at grinding steel!

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  22. #37
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    My Metabo was stolen after 25 years of use. In a rush, I bought one of those HF grinders. Don't. After 5 or 10 minutes of use, your hand starts to tingle from the vibration, and eventually you have to put it down, and your hands still feel like they are vibrating. I have used the replacement Metabo for hours, only shutting down to change consumables, without the problem.

    Hand arm vibration - Worried about your hands?

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    I have and used about every brand out there. First question to ask is how much grinding are you doing. If your be Beviling and grinding welds all day go bigger 6" or more.
    I have certain grinders for certain jobs. I use a vary speed 4 1/2 for polishing concrete surfaces. Works great doesn't bog but does get warm after a lot of pressure grinding. I have a Milwaukee with a paddle switch that I use 6" cutoffs wheels. Love it easy on off without having the switch unlock at half cut. I have dewalts but honestly the safety levers on switch are a pain to engage without using both hand to lock.
    My newest set of grinders are Bosch. 7.5amp 11k rpm grip area has a little more length to get your hand away from wheel area. Easy on/off switch. Menards has on sale right now 2 pack with grinding wheels for 80 bucks. They have quick adjust shields too no tooling cam locks.
    I personally think metabo and fein are way over priced. I can buy half a dozen bosch's for the price of one.
    I've burnt two grinder in my life one I arced the cord when metal fell on cord and arced the cord. Second was a cheap hb. When they give you spare brushes that should be a clue. IT SUCKS.

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    Bosch ones use to be great, but it seams like things have changed, one of my customers must have at least a dozen of them in various models - flavours but all 4 1/2" all the newer ones have the gearboxes strip, old ones just keep on chugging with just the occasional brush change.

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    I bought a Makita 4" way back in 1978 or 79 for $80. I installed new brushes and a switch 2 years ago. It is now my #2 grinder. I bought a new Makita 4-1/2" with soft start and variable speed. The soft start is nice and I use the variable speed a lot more than I ever expected to. I think I paid around $180 for it. The switch takes some getting used to, but I like it. We will see if it lasts as long as the first one.

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