Best steel for making an Anvil? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by davycrocket View Post
    Just searched 'advanced search' selecting max distance away that I wanted to go to pick up..
    *snip*
    Can you not do the same via Ebay USA ?

    Davycrocket
    Probably better yet is searchtempest.com with one's postal ZIP as base, and a max distance. Starts with CL, devolves to ebay, so covers both in one go. Experience sez you've got to run the search often, and be prepared to move with alacrity. The good stuff usually goes FAST.

    CAVEAT: Sorting through 'anvil case', 2 to 22 lb toys, and 'anvil WANTED' not marked as wanted 'til opened, is tedious. Then one gets into the obvious smelter fugitives....

    But eventually, the search I just ran DID turn up quite a few 'proper' anvils, typically at 1/5 to 1/2 of equivalent new prices..

    ....and at about 350-400 miles out, sadly, Metro DC being more in the biz of hammering the taxpayer's pocketbook than forging anything useful...

    Bill

  2. #42
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    I have had a Nimba, made from 8640, for about ten years now.
    I love it.
    I guess a forged anvil might, theoretically be a bit better than a cast one, but my guess is you would need to do very heavy duty work all day every day to notice much difference in lifespan.



    The designer and original maker of Nimba's, Russell Jacque, was a friend of mine, and the current owner and maker, Jim Garrett, is a friend of mine too, so I am sure that prejudices me to some degree, but I think they are one of the finest anvils you can buy, new or used. And they are made in the USA.

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  4. #43
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    Default Usae of old Rail to make anvils

    If one needs to make an anvil, then the best Railroad rail to use is a worn, (ie flat) 120 or 150 lb type ( ie, 150 Pounds per Yard).

    The proper shape can be made by cutting out the ends of the web, to give clearance for a good Bic, and a clear through-holes for Swages, hardies, and other tools,( at the square end). BY grinding and finishing, the finished form can be achieved.

    Heat treating to top can also be achieved easily, with a bed of Charcoal, a blower, and a large Quenching tank.

    ( Most HD rail these days has Patented "Induction" Hardened tops, anyway.)

    Naturally, this will still only give you a "medium weight" Anvil. For the really heavy work, the above mentioned Commercial anvils are the best...but are you Handforging Locomotive drive rods, or similar?

    Occasionally good, heavy Blacksmiths anvils come up for sale in Farm clearances, etc...one has to keep an eye out...

    Regards,
    Doc AV
    AV Ballistics Film Ordnance Services

  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by fciron View Post
    Last time I checked I was a professional blacksmith and I have no idea what you're on about. I plan on continuing to use 'forge' the way I always have and I hope RayJohns enjoys forging on his anvil no matter what kind he gets.
    Hi Lewis,

    I was still sort of curious to hear what you mean when you use the term "forge". You say you are a professional blacksmith - and that you have no idea what I'm talking about - but everything I can find suggests that my definition of the term is right on the mark.

    I'm certainly not a professional blacksmith (not by a long shot) but I did recently speak to a guy who is. I asked him specifically about my use of the term forging and if I was incorrect or not.

    Here is what he said:

    "forging is altering the granular (crystal) structure through pressure (impact or compression) doesn't matter how you achieve it hot or cold. i.e. smashing metal is forging. technically simply bending a bar is forging."

    His sentiments on the subject seem to be supported by Wiki's definition of the term also:

    Forging - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    A quote from the Wiki link above:

    "History - Forging is one of the oldest known metalworking processes. Traditionally, forging was performed by a smith using hammer and anvil, and though the use of water power in the production and working of iron dates to the 12th century, the hammer and anvil are not obsolete."

    That seems to support my comments regarding forging metal on an anvil - at least as near as I can see.

    Let me know if you have something to add and/or if I'm overlooking some aspect of blacksmithing or metal work or forging, etc.

    Thanks!

    Ray

  6. #45
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    Default wanting insite on building my own anvil

    Quote Originally Posted by gwilson View Post
    I made the patterns for all but a few of the anvils used in Williamsburg's blacksmith shop. We got them cast out of 4140 and hardened. The first pattern I made was in the late 70's,used hard daily,and they are not sway backed yet. Cast in Texas. Foundry went tits up,and they lost my pattern. I'm not sure where they are getting the 2nd. pattern(of an earlier type anvil) cast,but they are 300#,and cost $1500.00 each!! Ouch! I retired before they sent the pattern off.
    was wondering if you had any idears on anvil steel types. 4140,4130,5160, S7/; what kind of tool steel is this? never herd of it. I have the money to buy a good anvil I just want to do it my self conquer it battle it ect.... thanks in advance Weber.


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