Betenbender press brake & Dies 190 ton x 12' - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I have a Cincinnati 230 ton hydraulic, I love it. Other shops are so jealous of it. I am purchasing 2 top dies and 1 bottom die so I can cut it to lengths as needed. I like cutting the dies at 1/2 and 3/4" lengths it's a lot easier to get closer for smaller material then. My brake has locking plates that hold the dies at 24" so I'm cutting my dies to be 24" every 2. So I will cut a 2" and 22" etc. This will allow me to clamp them back into the brake very easily and not hold 8 smaller pieces.

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    On the same note, what if you have a 18" pan, a 17 1/4" pan or a 11 7/16" pan... You need to make sure you have enough smaller dies to make all of the completely odd sized pans or you will be cutting more down to size and loosing bigger dies

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  3. #23
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    IMHO if you check out most tooling suppliers all the big names do sectional top tools, the lengths are pretty std and they add up to give you anything you will need, its not something you need to reinvent. Cut em the standard sizes and the combinations work out just fine for everything.

  4. #24
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    Thanks for the input Bondo, I'm not yet sure how tall of a drip pan that I will have to make, as far as the sizes I picked, I feel that I will cover 90% of what ever size I come across, maybe more.

    Adama, when I asked the tool supplier that Betenbender recommends, he never indicated that they already had a list on how to cut them up to cover all the bases...
    So I did it myself hoping I have my bases covered.

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    Default Press brake Die wear

    what is the biggest culprit for ruining press brake dies other than the obvious ( Bending to thick or to hard of steel. )

    I know rust is a killer on sharp bits... So my guess is rusty plate.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Portable Welder View Post
    what is the biggest culprit for ruining press brake dies other than the obvious ( Bending to thick or to hard of steel. )

    I know rust is a killer on sharp bits... So my guess is rusty plate.
    Well, the killer for ours was the chain used to move the punch & dies back and forth. Guess someone forgot it was there, and tried to bend it. Instead, the chain died, along with a 1" chunk in the center of the punch.

    But more common problem is going to be repetitive, short length bend jobs, that center the tonnage on a small piece of die. If you start getting jobs that repeat a lot, call the die company and see if they have any short pieces to save yours.

  7. #27
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    Diamond plate is probably the biggest die destroyer. Diamonds down really digs into the bottom die. Diamonds up isn't as bad but it depends on where it actually falls.

    I suggest you keep a special die set if you plan on making a lot of stair pans.

    For bending stainless steel, I use the brake urethane rubber. It works great keeping it scratch free. The biggest pita is keeping it on the bottom die. You get about 100 bends per use in average.

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  8. #28
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    Thanks Bondo, I really appreciate your advice, I have already been looking for a set of used dies for doing this type of work so I don't ruin my new dies...
    Also, thanks for the tip about urethane for doing stainless.

    To all that have replied, I would just like to say thanks for your input, even though I have owned a welding,fabricating and steel erecting business for 30 years, I still have a lot to learn when it comes to press brakes, so any tips are greatly appreciated.


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