buffalo ironworker
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  1. #1
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    Question buffalo ironworker

    I would like to get everyone's thoughts on a buffalo mechanical ironworker. I want an ironworker so bad that I can taste it, but I don't have 5 or 6 grand. I do know a guy that has a large (about a 1 1/2 buffalo mechanical ironworker ) that he says he will take a grand for that has a large lot of tooling with also. I know that mechanical ironworkers are dangerous, but the bottom line is this; don't get your hands caught in the machine or ELSE!!! Also, my way of thinking is this; whether it be mechanical or hydraulic, you are screwed either way if you do get your hands under it correct? Also, I would like to know if anyone can give me any idea as to how thick a piece of steel that this machine will punch and shear. Thanks for any advice that anyone can give me.

  2. #2
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    You can find a lot of info if you google them.
    I got a great deal on a Buffalo 1/2 that was made in the 40's. It had a lot of functions and my favorite was the coper. It would take a 2" X 2" bite out of 1/4" steel and was great for shaping. They are great to run on a phase converter because the flywheel does the work not direct hp. I ordered a manual for mine and it cost $50. and was mostly jiberish but it did have ajustments and parts breakdown.
    I was notching a piece of steel and the machine pinched my finger between the work and the approach to the cutter. I drew back and counted my fingers and luckily they were all there but one was a little flatter and hurt like hell! I've been around machinery and off road equipment all my life and I do respect it but that thing got me!
    That was when I decided to get a hydraulic machine. With mechanical when you step on the peddle SOMETHING is going to get cut. Step on the peddle and there is no turning back. With hydraulic you can stop in the middle of the stroke and back up.
    I now have a 50 ton Scotchman Ironworker and I love it! It doesn't have as many options but it's a hell of a lot safer!
    If you are desperate I would get the Buffalo but if you can hold off for a deal hydraulic is much better. Also the older mechanicals won't pass an OSHA inspection, they don't have proper guards.
    Either way an Ironworker is worth it's weight in gold for fabrication. They will easily pay for theirself if you have the work to support them.

  3. #3
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    A 1 1/2 will do 4" angle. Its about a 65 ton machine, depending on how old it is. 6300 pounds for the one shown above, but its from the twenties. Newer ones may be slightly different, but 6000lbs is in the ballpark.

    Buffalo's work. They are just a bit scary sometimes.
    They are usually quite cheap, considering what they weigh- scrap value isnt much less than selling price a lot of times.

    New punches and dies are available to fit them, cheap and in stock from Cleveland Punch. Shearing and notching blades are a bit more hassle- usually made to order, and pricier, but lots of shear blade companies out there know how to make parts for Buffalo's.

  4. #4
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    Cool

    We had a Buffalo 1 1/2 that was made in the late 70's and it was a great machine. The best news is they are still in business and you can get some parts. http://www.bmt-usa.com/products.htm I would grab one in a minute no matter what shape its in...Bob
    Bob Wright Metal Master Fab
    Salem, Ohio Birthplace of the Silver and Deming Drill, all others are copies.

  5. #5
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    Default ever get the iron worker

    i just got a buffalo from ebay,need to pick it up next week,will look good siting next to my webb iron worker.

  6. #6
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    We have a number of old machines in Durham, NC that came out of our old family business. We are trying hard to get specifications on them for a museum display and noticed the English Brothers catalog that is pictured in this thread and hoping that it might have them featured. Does anyone have information or knowledge of these equipment pieces or know if they are pictured in the English Brothers Catalog or where I might get a copy?

    -Elames (?) 300 tn press brake manufactured 1939 somewhere up north USA dbww_01_01.jpg
    -Cincinnati shear 1936 dbww_01_05.jpg
    -radial arm drill - model unknown dbww_26.jpg
    -Beaudry & Co. Hammer dbww_01_02.jpg
    -Niagara Nibbler dbww_01_03.jpg

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  8. #7
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    hydraulic ironworkers are safer than flywheel ironworkers cause in general if something overloads machine they stall with hydraulic pressure relief valve and hopefully less damage done to machine
    .
    knew guy got his hand pulled into a power metal roller (rolling 3/8 plate) and he put in reverse to get his hand out., broke every bone in his hand and it was never exactly healed fully. got to be always careful

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by stmlandplan View Post
    We have a number of old machines in Durham, NC that came out of our old family business. We are trying hard to get specifications on them for a museum display and noticed the English Brothers catalog that is pictured in this thread and hoping that it might have them featured. Does anyone have information or knowledge of these equipment pieces or know if they are pictured in the English Brothers Catalog or where I might get a copy?

    -Elames (?) 300 tn press brake manufactured 1939 somewhere up north USA dbww_01_01.jpg
    -Cincinnati shear 1936 dbww_01_05.jpg
    -radial arm drill - model unknown dbww_26.jpg
    -Beaudry & Co. Hammer dbww_01_02.jpg
    -Niagara Nibbler dbww_01_03.jpg
    You really need to start a new thread.

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  11. #9
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    To Forum Monitor:
    I posted to this thread several weeks ago in search of some information on several other pieces of equipment... but now most of these pictures are popping up in Google searches with the title of 'Buffalo Iron Worker' ....this of course is not correct. I would like to remove my post and i will repost each piece of equipment under the proper name. How do I remove my post?


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