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  1. #21
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    I did one about the same tonnage I used 3/4"x 12 for my cross beams and table and 1x4 of the up rights 49" between uprights the top crossbeam is boxed by the cylinder and it visibly doesn't budge I'm sure getting some decent deflection though. but my table is terrifying Im going to have to stiffen it up start getting above 30 ton range it starts getting spooky creaking and groaning thats were I stop I copied a baighlys design

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    So I will be adding back to the design some perpendicular pieces to the uprights. I was thinking 1/2"x 2-1/2". Is that sufficient?

    Several of you had mentioned a better suited cylinder. I'm curious to hear what might be an ideal choice?

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    Quote Originally Posted by CPM2014 View Post
    So I will be adding back to the design some perpendicular pieces to the uprights. I was thinking 1/2"x 2-1/2". Is that sufficient?

    Several of you had mentioned a better suited cylinder. I'm curious to hear what might be an ideal choice?
    I have a typical c-channel press for bearing pressing stuff with a 35 ton mechanical jack that works great. I really prefer the mechanical screw jack to an enerpac setup. It's much faster.

    I run tools in my 100 ton press. I built it from 2.5" steel plate and used a 10.5" hydraulic cylinder. Powered by a 10HP motor and 3000 PSI pump.

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    Pay attention to the raise mechanism (small cable winch) on the press Ries built . . . A simple cost effective way to adjust your press.

    We have this on our press along with bearing mounted cylinder slide (which we use all the time). We also used a pneumatically powered Enerpac pump with a foot pedal to control raise / lower so you have your hands free. It is much quieter than an electric pump.

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    Keep all the deflections in the press as low as you can afford. I don't know the total deflection on my 35T Dake under significant load, but its a lot. When something gives or breaks the press wants to jump off the floor. Deflection is stored energy, and thats bad news.

    I agree with the robustness of a larger cylinder ram. I think my Dake is a 6" ram.

    Don't forget a safety shield! Make it convenient and easy to use. If its a pita it won't get used.

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    Why are are you dreaming about presses? Seems a bit strange to me.......

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    adama: What kind of rivets and what diameters are you needing to do?

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    Check out the press in this video. Does not look like anything special but they said they had it up to 150 ton during the video. Notice the round pins and non wallowed pin holes. Also, note the side of the press are not solid bar stock either but look to be 3/4-1" thick angle. Press looked to have min deflection when the shaft broke free. I think it might be wise to revisit your design and base it off of proven designs. Heavy Metal Machining Part 1 - YouTube

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  11. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by B-Mathews View Post
    Check out the press in this video. Does not look like anything special but they said they had it up to 150 ton during the video. Notice the round pins and non wallowed pin holes. Also, note the side of the press are not solid bar stock either but look to be 3/4-1" thick angle. Press looked to have min deflection when the shaft broke free. I think it might be wise to revisit your design and base it off of proven designs. Heavy Metal Machining Part 1 - YouTube

    I am finding a lot of presses designed the same as mine. This one in the video, a 100t Enerpac press has solid bar stock verticals which seem pretty close to the dimensions of my 50T. Why would the use of overkill solid verticals be so bad if the are so many high end presses designed this way?
    PRENSA ENERPAC - YouTube

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    this company makes a press called a servex press they have been around for quite a number of years.

    It has a screw adjustment for the ram and is either power assisted

    hp100-parts-list.jpg for some reason it wanted to attach here instead of at the bottom of page...hand operated one shown.


    or pump by hand, the pump by hand is useful for straightening shafts. I like the 100Ton press as its frame is large enough to do most if not all work needed.
    I know because i used to own one.

    Contact Us - CEM International

    see brochures01-hydraulic-press-brochure.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Street View Post
    this company makes a press called a servex press they have been around for quite a number of years.

    It has a screw adjustment for the ram and is either power assisted

    hp100-parts-list.jpg for some reason it wanted to attach here instead of at the bottom of page...hand operated one shown.


    or pump by hand, the pump by hand is useful for straightening shafts. I like the 100Ton press as its frame is large enough to do most if not all work needed.
    I know because i used to own one.

    Contact Us - CEM International

    see brochures01-hydraulic-press-brochure.jpg
    I would love to have a rough screw adjustment. I had access to a press with it and it was a useful accessory.

  14. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Ries riveting how did you find it? did you need to guide both tools to keep it centred? Have some to do on the press. Equally i have a long term job we have been mulling over for a year or 2 now thats got a couple of hundred rivets, but to reach would need something akin to a 2' G clamp with both a wide and deep throat to get the needed clearances.


    I ran over 8000 1/4" stainless rivets with the dies shown in the picture- I made the dies on the lathe, from mild steel, used a ball mill to make the form.
    1/4" and 3/8" stainless are no problem cold, with 30 tons.
    1/2" diameter stainless rivets I had to press hot- heat the rivet first.
    I just tack welded my die holding plate to the lower cross beams, to keep registration, it workedfine.
    I also bought an Enerpac C shaped (G clamp in blighty) device, but it only takes a 10 ton cylinder- enough to do 1/4" rivets cold, but no bigger unless they are hot. I use that one for site work, when I need to set rivets someplace that hauling a thousand pound press up a ladder might be troublesome. I think mine is the A-210 model.
    Arbor Press, C Clamp Press & A Series Press | Enerpac

    rivets are pretty forgiving. Its not like pressing a bearing in a machined sleeve- you are squashing something.
    Especially hot, you can get away with a lot. My buddy Steve Howell is the king of this- he makes riveted connections the likes of which we havent seen in fifty years or more.
    Instagram
    Steve special ordered, from China (anyang) a "2' G Clamp ) thingie some years ago- its a portable hydraulic press he hangs from the ceiling for riveting.
    He has also fabricated his own, from plate, and retrofitted some older punches and presses with cast iron frames to do this sort of deep throat riveting.
    He probably knows more about this than anybody in the USA right now, most likely the world. He does riveting up to 1 1/2" dia.
    there are pics of some of his deep throat riveters on his website-
    Ballard Forge Seatttle Blacksmith and Ironwork

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    Thanks Ries, that answers a lot of questions. Rivet wise its just 1/4" steel, but in a range of head flavours across these jobs. Glad the mild steel tooling worked, will do the same for the riveting i have to do. So far i have only had to do one job that involved riveting and that was also a 1/4" rivet, but through a 16 gauge 5/8" circular tube, obviously you can't squeeze it as it just buckles in the tube, ended up just 3D printing a head on with the TIG :-) Its only a depth stop though for a internal suspension type spring to rest on.

    Heat wise, will probably just use the TIG its really quick and easy to heat a stem like a rivet end up to red heat in seconds, but if i can do 1/4" cold that sounds all the easier. 10 ton number for 3/8" rivets is real useful to know, gives me a solid variable to plan around! Had looked at those enpac clamps, but they don't give me the throat i need, will just get some profiles cut in hardox, knock my own up, will be a lot cheaper too, I can probably just clamp that in the vice and bring my job too it, its something akin to a oil drum size C section with flat ribs to be riveted in.

    As to press and tonnage, i have never met some one yet with a press that could do anything they wanted - never had a job come up that needed more tonnage. For me a circa 10 ton riveting G clamp style press is next, but theres a long standing interest from multiple customers for pressings, but im then looking at a circa 200+ ton and a good 24" of real stroke + probably additional clamping cylinders before that becomes even remotely viable. Issue there is with limited lifting gear here, making a 200 ton press is seriously logistically challenging.

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    Dave Probst built a press that has some features that your might want to copy. Unfortunately, his website has disappeared with the build article. Here is a couple of links to pinterest with some photos of the press.

    Rick

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    I do not have any learned tips or advice on the building of your press. I have witnessed the building of a engineer's dream press once upon a time. It took almost six months to build, not counting design time. The press was carefully though out, and was intended to solve 99% of the press applications we encountered. It was six feet wide, and almost nine feet tall, with all the bells and whistles. It failed in a spectacular fashion on the second day of service, when the designer tried to break the sample weld of a job seeker. Hydraulic oil dripped from the 22' ceiling for weeks. The moral is: Be conservative in design, don't try to make it do every job that could possibly come through the door, and give your press time to prove out. Regards, Clark

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    Quote Originally Posted by sealark37 View Post
    I do not have any learned tips or advice on the building of your press. I have witnessed the building of a engineer's dream press once upon a time. It took almost six months to build, not counting design time. The press was carefully though out, and was intended to solve 99% of the press applications we encountered. It was six feet wide, and almost nine feet tall, with all the bells and whistles. It failed in a spectacular fashion on the second day of service, when the designer tried to break the sample weld of a job seeker. Hydraulic oil dripped from the 22' ceiling for weeks. The moral is: Be conservative in design, don't try to make it do every job that could possibly come through the door, and give your press time to prove out. Regards, Clark
    holy shit that is rich!!! I seriously hope that engineer is long gone hahahahaha

  21. #37
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    Ok update on the riveting. Strange i know but one side of the job was mushroom head other side std half sphere dome end what ever you wish to call it. Its a match the original bit type deal.

    Unguided, it was a struggle, tonnage no issue, but it was ugly, rivet would tend to buckle side ways a bit. Forming the sphere end. parts could not be clamped think to crossing bits of 1" wide 1/8" flat probaly did not help.

    Guided with the exact same tools just mounted in a die shoe and it was a simple easy job, i forget the tonnage i ran but it was in the circa 3-4 ton range.

    Probably could have done with a little more rivet length ideally too, maybe a 1/16" more to get a fuller head. Bottom mushroom tool was just mild steel, top tool was water hardened carbon steel aka silver steel over here as it was a tool i made a while back.

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    We have been very busy this last yeah with the Semiconductor industry being so hot. We haven't had a lot of time to work on the press but, we are now winding down on the machine work. Should start assembling next week. All components are in house like the pump, cylinder, hoses, gauges, etc. Just need more time now..
    20180220_091044.jpg20180220_091037.jpg

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    ^ yeah i keep thinking i need to get the time machine built, then i can deliver all the other stuff i need and still have time to spare.

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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    ^ yeah i keep thinking i need to get the time machine built, then i can deliver all the other stuff i need and still have time to spare.
    Haha, yeah, that would help with allot of things. Let me borrow it when you get the time machine together.


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