Choice between Fiber laser or CO2 laser ?
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  1. #1
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    Default Choice between Fiber laser or CO2 laser ?

    Hello,

    We are searching for new Laser machine. Now we are having Trumpf 4KW CO2 laser machine. We are cutting more than 95% mild steel and hardox in thickness range from 0,12in (3mm) to 0,79in (20mm). In future we would like also like to cut 1in (25 mm) on the laser so we are thinking about 6 KW laser machine. Now is very popular fiber technology but we don't know if this technology is also so appropriate for thick mild steel..or we rather stay on CO2 technology ? Does anyone have experience with 6KW fiber lasers ? Does it CO2 technology abandons? How is with the cost comparison between fiber and cO2 laser if someone has some data maybe ? And then also possibility of cutting mild steel with nitrogen in lower thickness range, fiber lasers have high speeds in this case but what is with the gas consumption ? And how is with spare parts with fiber lasers and maintenance is it cheaper than by CO2 lasers and how much ? Maybe has someone experience with these things and can help with some advice or data...and which company you recommend ?

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    We have 2 Fibers and 4 CO2's (2 Mitsubishi Fibers, 1 Mitsubishi CO2 and 3 Amada Pulsar CO2's). 1 8K Fiber is on an FMS set-up along with 1 CO2 4.5K. The other 4K Fiber is on it's own FMS. And the 3 other CO2's are stand alone units.

    We just got the 8K Fiber online Mid January but I can say compared to the 4.5K CO2 it averages 3 times faster on .120 (3mm) CRS. That just translates into less consumables and less assist gas which = less money and better return.

    I saw a demo at Mitsubishi where they went from cutting .075 (1.9mm)to 1 Inch Plate in less than a minute without the operator touching the machine. It has an Auto Focus Head and auto Nozzle changing.

    Most of our cutting is on 1/4 and less down to about .036 on CRS, HRS, SST and Aluminum.

    The latest time studies I did showed the speed of cutting is related to the number of pierces and how long the cuts are. If the part has a lot of corners and pierces the overall average speed drops. Thus a .120 CRS part can and will cut faster than a .105 CRS part.

    Data:

    .105 CRS Total linear inches of cut on a sheet = 5130.34, time 34 minutes = 150.892 IPM average.
    Part Size: 17.025 x 4.137 with 19 pierces per part. Cutting condition: 500 IPM Insides, 1000 IPM Outside

    .120 CRS Total linear inches of cut on a sheet = 5976.57, time 38 minutes = 157.278 IPM average.
    Part Size: 54.062 x 5.472 with 50 pierces per part. Cutting condition: 700 IPM Insides, 700 IPM Outside

    .134 CRS Total linear inches of cut on a sheet = 2521.24, time 24 minutes = 105.056 IPM average.
    Part Size: 27.000 x 6.681 with 15 pierces per part. Cutting condition: 700 IPM Insides, 700 IPM Outside


    Looking at the .105 vs .120, just like a Race Car the Machine has to slow down for the corners.

    I would highly recommend looking at Mitsubishi. We ordered second Mitsubishi 8K last week. Should be here in March. This will replace the 6K Fiber in the other FMS.

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    The one better than the other point has been pretty fluid over the last couple of years, the fibre technology is making big big inroads and is pushing ever higher power levels. The fibre energy efficiencies are so much better too, you can run a 8kw fibre on less incoming supply than a 4kw CO2. maintenance wise its nearly non existent on fibre compared to CO2, there’s just no beam path consumables till you get to the output lens. No constant beam path nitrogen purge or any of the vacuum issues of the CO2 resonator, fibre lasers are fundamentally simple solid state devices.

    I too like the Mitsubishi, but credit were its do, one of my suppliers runs a Trump and the cut quality is always nice from them.

    Speaking to the local Mitsubishi service Tech, he says a few places are sticking with Large CO2 and Amada and a few others are continuing to develop it as supposedly in ultra thick stainless it still has a edge in cut edge quality, but he was talking 30-80mm thick. Well outside what your contemplating.

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    You can choose Signvec Technology pte ltd. Signvec one of the best engraving industry. we are offering all type of laser products like fiber laser marking machine.cnc laser, engraver etc.

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    Hello...first i would like to thank everyone for the answers, but I still have a few questions...your supplier which runs a Trumpf laser has a Fiber laser or a CO2 laser machine ? and what is the power of his laser ? material and maximum thickness of the piece he cuts for you ?...well we are interesting in fiber laser, but we are not quite sure that the quality of the cut would be enought good especially in thicker range, when we would cut 20 and 25 mm mild steel..maybe you have some experience..is it possible to cut holes in which comes threads with fiber laser and to what thickness ? maybe you have some experience ?

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    Have you looked at DDL (Direct Diode Laser) I believe it is suppose to support fast cutting speeds on thicker materials vs the fiber and provide better efficiency than a fiber laser as well.


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