Draining a landslide, help needed designing push pipe - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Honestly some simple drainage under the rebuilt road and further down the hill will stop that from happening, not sure how much perforated pipe is there but over here its pretty dang cheap compared to a few hundred meters of road bed.
    I think the 'simple drainage' under the road would merely be situated in material that is part of the entire hillside sliding down. The whole mountain is slipping, not just the road. We have many such situations in northern California and the solution isn't to screw with the existing slipping road, it's to relocate the highway to a completely different location, one that isn't moving. Do a little search for 'Last Chance Grade' in Del Norte/Humboldt County, CA

    Stuart

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    I read first page, no time for the rest. Its a hot real estate market there, sell, find some place else.

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    I think the 'simple drainage' under the road would merely be situated in material that is part of the entire hillside sliding down.

    Yep thats right were you want it, take that water, flow it through any pipes you wish, you want to stop it soaking down and keep the land dry, a few percent difference in moisture is all it takes between slide or not.

    You normally do it in perforated plastic so as it dries out and things move - settle a little you don't get cracking and leakage like in clay tile.

    over here the pipe is but a couple of quid a meter and it goes in fast with a plow like arangement.

  5. #64
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    As atomarc said, this is a case of the entire mass hillside slipping. You can put all the tubing and pipes you want into the landslide, and the tubing will happily come down with all the rest of it.

    We now know that many of these locations are ancient landslides. When LIDAR surveys hit this area, they found hundreds, if not thousands, of previously unknown ancient landslides. Unfortunately, the soil engineers don't have any cheap solutions for stabilizing such sites. Which is where this thread originated: expensive, non-guaranteed treatments to hold things off a little while longer.

    The Oso landslide was fundamentally different to the current Hwy 101 landslide. In the Hwy 101 landslide, a large chunk of surface is slowly and fairly uniformly slipping down the face of the mountain. At Oso, a massive chunk of nearly vertical bluff let loose as a nearly instantaneous and catastropic (and multiply lethal) earth flow.

  6. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    As atomarc said, this is a case of the entire mass hillside slipping. You can put all the tubing and pipes you want into the landslide, and the tubing will happily come down with all the rest of it.

    We now know that many of these locations are ancient landslides. When LIDAR surveys hit this area, they found hundreds, if not thousands, of previously unknown ancient landslides. Unfortunately, the soil engineers don't have any cheap solutions for stabilizing such sites. Which is where this thread originated: expensive, non-guaranteed treatments to hold things off a little while longer.

    The Oso landslide was fundamentally different to the current Hwy 101 landslide. In the Hwy 101 landslide, a large chunk of surface is slowly and fairly uniformly slipping down the face of the mountain. At Oso, a massive chunk of nearly vertical bluff let loose as a nearly instantaneous and catastropic (and multiply lethal) earth flow.
    If the slip is do to peak rain fall - soil saturation then trust me you only need a few percent drainage to deal with it.

    If the whole mass is sliding because its that unstable when dry surely the vibration from ever passing car would make it move? Very few places experience that, simply because if the site is that unstable it has already moved to the bottom of the hill.

    This is kinda basic at the beech sand castle engineering, keep the moisture in check and baring earth quake style events it will stay still.


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