Equipment to start Welding and Fabrication Shop. - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    May 2003
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    Buckeye, AZ USA
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    You will want to figure out what "kind" of fab work you want to do. Around here, there are two kinds. The ones that deal with farmers and the ones that don't. Farmers are hard on equipment and there is never a loss for work. Most work is large; spreaders, combines, tractors, etc. you will want to either hire someone else for help or get a partner.Remember. Farmers are "CHEAP BASTARDS".
    The shops that don't deal with farmers do everything else and usually are too elegant to work on farm equipment. Regardless, If your shop is making money now, you may be spreading yourself thin by trying to grow too big for a one man shop. Figure out what you can do and build up your equipment from there. A lot of machines sitting idle don't make money. JMHO
    DQ

  2. #22
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    Jul 2005
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    Midlothian, Virginia
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    Lots of good suggestions above.

    Find an old retired guy in your area who has been there, done that. Buy him dinner. Pick his brain.

    Search for other welder/fab sites and see if they have an equipment/capabilities list, like some machine shops.

    Have any community colleges or similar schools nearby? Talk to the instructors and glean what information you can.

  3. #23
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    I have a mixed machine/welding shop and have a close friend with the same on a larger scale.

    For me, TIG and MIG are essentials as well as a nice mitre bandsaw. I recently aquired a 15' X 30" t-slot table that has made many jobs simpler.

    I can say for my friend that a large grainer and a CNC punch were his best investments. If you find a reasonably priced grainer they open doors for sheetmetal.

  4. #24
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    Mar 2018
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    UNITED STATES
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    Welding Shop-Everything You Need to know About Welding
    Everything You Need to Know About Welding

  5. #25
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  6. #26
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    May 2018
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    You have a mix of MIG and TIG work, suggest go for the MIG work first if you're trying to approach this incrementally. Can get a relatively inexpensive used welder, and relatively easy to learn.

    Being able to do TIG work will make you stand out more, and you'll need it for the AL and SS sheets, but in terms of skills and equipment, it's a larger investment. Also, each TIG job might be different enough that if you are starting out you're gonna need to invest extra time in figuring out the right approach with prep, gas, filler, other techniques.


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