fastset/easiest way to cut 1/8" x 3/4" angle CRS?
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  1. #1
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    Default fastset/easiest way to cut 1/8" x 3/4" angle CRS?

    The cut isn't a precision cut and has a 1/8" of flexibility. I am currently using a horizontal bandsaw, but it is taking more time than I would like for cutting and positioning. I want to say the metal yard I buy stuff from has a "nibbler", but am not sure that is the correct term since I am not finding many results when I search HGR (nearest place to buy used).

    Any other options, or idea what other terms to search under?

    Thanks
    Chris

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    "Angle Shear" is the term you are using. 3/4x1/8" angle is no problemo.

    Roper Whitney #4 would be a good choice.

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    At the fab shop I worked at we used a metal devil type circular saw for cutting all our carbon steel lengths. Super fast and leaves clean cuts.

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    Ironworker or piranha but those are big beastly machines.
    Really awesome and super useful though.

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    3/4" angle with an 1/8" wall?

    Ironworker w/ angle shear: 1 second
    Metal Circular Saw: 3 seconds
    Bandsaw: 5 seconds

    The value added portion of the job doesn't seem to take much time. Perhaps you should put a little effort into your setup and that would be a more efficient savings. How are you cutting the angle? Are you cutting it like an "L" or a "<" ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by CatMan View Post
    3/4" angle with an 1/8" wall?

    Ironworker w/ angle shear: 1 second
    Metal Circular Saw: 3 seconds
    Bandsaw: 5 seconds

    The value added portion of the job doesn't seem to take much time. Perhaps you should put a little effort into your setup and that would be a more efficient savings. How are you cutting the angle? Are you cutting it like an "L" or a "<" ?
    good question. In hindsight, I may stick with the bandsaw. I am using my bandsaw to do the prototype. However, if made in volume, I can stack the angle and cut 20 at a time. Naturally, time wouldn't be as fast as the Ironworker, but it will give me time to find a used ironworker for the right price.

    I was cutting them like this ^ for my prototype, but in bulk, they would be >

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    You could triple stack cut them in a chop saw or 1000 stack in band saw if you know how to properly do that. For one and twos I just use the cut off wheel. You also have to think about clean up of the end. Ironworkers sounds great but it could leave a hell of a burr depending on adjustment. Chop saw will leave a nice burr, a steel chop saw or bandsaw will leave minimal clean up.

    Sent from my 2PS64 using Tapatalk

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    Ironworkers are great tools but I don't know any with a 1 second cycle time and from my experience it was clunky to line up your mark for shearing and almost impossible to get a straight cut because of how it torqued the piece while cutting (maybe ours was just too old and loose). It can also deform the ends a good bit. The circular saw is just as fast as cutting through a 2x4 and it's easy enough to square up and get a nice straight cut with minimal burr, setting up for angled cuts is simple as well. Stacking pieces in a bandsaw can be fast too but if something moves or isn't lined up right for whatever reason, you just cut X number of pieces to the wrong length.

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    I agree about the circular saw with respect to being easy, but would liken it to an abrasive saw where there would be a mess in the shop when running it for production.

    I think stacking in a bandsaw would be easiest. I could triple up and do 30 at a time, easy and having cut stacked, have never had a problem with alignment.

    I still like the idea of the ironworker if I could set up a stop and measure them off quickly. Never thought about torquing. I have never used one. I will look more into that before buying.

    Thanks for the input/ideas

    Chris

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    did some of that with stacks of 2" angle would just run a bead of weld up the butt ends so nothing could move had to throw away the butt though

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    I haven't found much I can't cut reasonably quick in a good bandsaw.

    If you have a decent 1" blade or bigger saw it should cut through a healthy stack of thin angle real quick.

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    Just want to point out for a one off a hacksaw and a vise will do this job toot sweet with very little setup time if you don't have to look for your hacksaw.

    metalmagpie

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    Another vote for a R/W manual angle shear. Fast as you can load it in there and push the handle down. Fraction the cost of an ironworker, unless you can justify the ironworker for other jobs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CatMan View Post
    3/4" angle with an 1/8" wall?

    Ironworker w/ angle shear: 1 second
    Metal Circular Saw: 3 seconds
    Bandsaw: 5 seconds

    The value added portion of the job doesn't seem to take much time. Perhaps you should put a little effort into your setup and that would be a more efficient savings. How are you cutting the angle? Are you cutting it like an "L" or a "<" ?
    In my experience of all of the cutting methods you listed bandsaws are the easiest to setup so that they take forever to get through anything. It seems to me like this is a case of misusing the bandsaw, or maybe there are many different lengths that need to be cut.

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    Iron workers are great for larger runs of rough work... 10-20 min to set up, hours of chomping. If your cutting up 10 or less lengths of material, go for a band saw (welded stacks).
    You want to turn 100+ lengths of angle into smaller bits of angle (and can deal with a slightly chewed up end) go for a ironworker.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PlasmaOnTheBrain View Post
    Iron workers are great for larger runs of rough work... 10-20 min to set up, hours of chomping. If your cutting up 10 or less lengths of material, go for a band saw (welded stacks).
    You want to turn 100+ lengths of angle into smaller bits of angle (and can deal with a slightly chewed up end) go for a ironworker.
    I disagree. It seems to me it's always faster to use the ironworker. In one setup you have to measure, clamp, and wait for the saw (even if short), while otherwise you just mark your angle, feed it in, and chomp it off.

    If we are talking in terms of ROI then I agree an ironworker is overkill for short runs.

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    If the bandsaw is taking longer than you would like, maybe it's time for a bigger bandsaw?

    I always like excuses to buy a better tool.

    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caspian View Post

    I was cutting them like this ^ for my prototype, but in bulk, they would be >
    NO in bulk they would be like, >>>>>>>>>> :-)

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    I've got a Whitney 3 x 1/4 hydraulic angle shear and notcher. The shear is double cut so it doesn't mangle the end of the angle. I wouldn't even consider using it to cut 1/8 x 3/4 angle, regardless of quantity. I'd cut it in a band saw. If there's much quantity, then stack it and run a weld across the back end.

    The shear/notcher is handy when building a frame or similar work where you cut a couple pieces, measure, cut another one, etc. The notcher allows for coped corners which are far quicker and cleaner than mitered ones. But for any sort of production cutting on small angle its far easier and faster to get accurate clean cuts via sawing.


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