FRiggn' Best Soldering Iron I've ever used....
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  1. #1
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    Default FRiggn' Best Soldering Iron I've ever used....

    Had to post this one, but was not sure where- So Fabrication zone seemed like a good place.

    I do and have done a '*bleep' load of soldering. Parts on & off. Tinning, SMD, discrerte, A to Z. I saw this review on Hadaday and bought one for a Vector drive board I'm fixing. I dont rave much online, but this thing had me at hello.

    Review: TS100 Soldering Iron | Hackaday

    UY CHAN Upgraded Original TS100 Digital OLED Programmable Pocket-size Smart Mini Outdoor Portable Soldering Iron Station Kit Embedded Interface DC5525 Acceleration Sensors STM32 Chip Fast Heat (B2) - - Amazon.com

    Now... this is 3/4 of the story. For a bunch of features & enhancements there is a freeware github firmware upgrade that really helps this thing sing. (took 2mins... literally).
    GitHub - Ralim/ts100: The Feature Packed Alternate Open Source firmware for the TS100 iron by miniware.

    Gets super hot, super quick. long reach w/ a very narrow neck.
    Anywho..... Had to share. I'll never plug in a weller again unless it's the monster size for #6 gauge or something.

    Just too cool not to share.
    CG.

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    Ever used a Hakko? I find them pretty decent. Bought my first one about 5 years ago and it's got some serious miles on it now. Hasn't missed a beat. Heat is instant.

    Weller is like bottom of the barrel shit isn't it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    Ever used a Hakko? I find them pretty decent. Bought my first one about 5 years ago and it's got some serious miles on it now. Hasn't missed a beat. Heat is instant.

    Weller is like bottom of the barrel shit isn't it?
    Weller made the first battery soldering iron? Never soldered with one. But they were awesome for making smoke from medical type plant residues. So many years ago. No combustion so no light to give position away.

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    I have a beat to hell Weller soldering gun I bought when I was putting together those Radio Shack project kits when I was a kid. I am kind of amazed at how long some of the tools I own have lasted. That sucker is probably 45 years old. I suppose if I needed another one I would buy a Weller, I wonder how their quality is now?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    Ever used a Hakko? I find them pretty decent. Bought my first one about 5 years ago and it's got some serious miles on it now. Hasn't missed a beat. Heat is instant.

    Weller is like bottom of the barrel shit isn't it?
    I'm an electrical engineer and I approve this message.

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    Can't remember the last time I needed to load new firmware into my 1980's WTCP. Just bought a nearly-new one last year...

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    Metcal, these use an RF power supply and curie temp tips, so do not rely on thermal load of the tip. The RF power supply supplies power as required to keep the tip at a *constant temp* by the bimetal construction of the tip and curie point. You can stick a 1/4" chisel tip or SMT rework tip in a handpiece and solder a big component, or a tiny tip for an tiny part or pad requiring the microscope and not burn the pads off or lack sufficient heat. The tips can also be had with different set-temps, to change a tip, you simply pull the cylindrical coaxial tubular tip out of he handpiece and slide another in. I've been using them since early 80's at IBM (they bought boatloads of them for manufacturing lines and such) when they first came out; patents have run out and there are a couple of people now still using the technology. The older Metcal power supplies and handpieces and many tip varieties (the STTC tip/socket versions are the best IMO), are readily available on Ebay and are bulletproof; I have two of the old tower looking power supplies and handpieces that are 25+ years old and work flawlessly, and you can still get any STTC shape/temp tip.

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    The best soldering irons I've ever used are the RF powered Metcals. They can switch from soldering tiny little SMD components to soldering high power devices to heavy copper planes just by swapping tips, which are plug-in, no tools required except a silicone rubber pad to protect your fingers.

    At home I have 2 of the Edsyn Loners (1 used to travel) with the adjustable temperature control in the handle. They've never disappointed me.


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