Good Books on Welding-Reference and Instruction
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  1. #1
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    Default Good Books on Welding-Reference and Instruction

    Hello Everyone

    I am looking for some good books on welding. I am trying to learn all I can on MIG, AO, and stick. I have access to all three of the previously mentioned equipment. I have watched several DVD's on all methods plus TIG. That is a good start but nothing beats practice and instruction from a human. I do plan on taking a class or two at one of the local tech schools unless I can find something more condensed. I have a well worn and well used copy of Machinery's Handbook. It is helpful but, in some cases, is pretty general.

    AO welding really interest me. TIG does also do the precise welds that can be achieved. AO seems to be an old fashion way of welding and I, for some reason, like old stuff and old ways of doing things. I also love to learn new things. Some of the books I have on machine work are older than I am.

    Thank you for any and all suggestions. If I get to be to big of a PITA(does not stand for people eating tasty animals) let me know.

    Grits

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    This Manual has impressed me more than any of the others that I've read to date.
    Sure did a lot more book reading before we got online.

    Fabricators' and Erectors'
    Guide to Welded Steel
    Construction

    https://ssl.lincolnelectric.com/linc...rodnum=FEGuide

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    Default Bood Reading

    We sure did. I am way behine on all my reading. It is sometimes nice not to have a computer or television to get back to old fashing reading. Reading is something else I enjoy.

    Grits

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    Good welding books are rare. I found one, though. It's a textbook used in many technical college welding classes. The title is "Welding Principles and Applications" by Jeffus. I own the 4th edition and use it sometimes. As with all technical books, I strongly recommend borrowing it from your local library and reading it first before deciding to purchase.

    Grant Erwin

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    Thanks Grant

    I will see if I can find a copy. Sometimes you can pick off a book like that on eBay.

    Grits

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    You are very wise to pursue OA welding as well as more modern techniques. OA welding teaches the basic principles of welding, something that is usually not so clear in other methods. If you learn OA welding, the other methods will come very naturally.

    Oxyacetylene Handbook by Linde.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike C. View Post
    You are very wise to pursue OA welding as well as more modern techniques. OA welding teaches the basic principles of welding, something that is usually not so clear in other methods. If you learn OA welding, the other methods will come very naturally.

    Oxyacetylene Handbook by Linde.
    that's somewhat true, most colleges still keep in a few credits of OA welding and I remember doing my time sitting in a t-shirt with what felt like a furnace pointed at your face welding mild steel in various funky positions. They say OA helps you learn the fundamentals of TIG and getting used to using both hands plus it's a little easier to see and control the heat. Ultimately OA is dead in the commercial world save for flame cutting.

    Personally I hate OA outside of using a rosebud to heat parts up and I don't use it for anything on personal projects. I don't like it cause it's slow and puts a lot of distortion and heat into the part, but that's personal preference.

    good books that's a hard one in terms of actual instructing on welding technique there are almost none as that is something you just can't convey all that great in books.
    http://www.welding.org/cart/training/gwbooks.htm
    hobart has some good books, I have the pocket guide, the GTAW book, and the engineering data sheets which I reference a lot of my job
    metals and how to weld them by the lincoln institute (I think?) is another one of those books that belongs on every welder's shelf.

    welcome to the world of welding, sounds like you're already hooked! I suggest you check out the forums at the american welding institute www.aws.org that place is full of useful information and frequented by many seasoned pro's

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    Grits,

    Reviews of quite a few welding books here:

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=30116

    franco

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    MetaRinka, our manual lathes, milling machines and shapers are also obsolete in today's commercial world, but they certainly do the job for me.

    OA is absolutely the most versatile welding apparatus for the home shop and is also the cheapest. It can do things no other welding machine can, like heating and cutting, as well as brazing and soldering. You can be totally set up for under $500. That's a down payment on anything else except a buzz box or puny 110 wire welder.

    I find TIG and OA compliment each other in developing skill. The TIG puddle is much clearer to see, the OA is more controllable (and can be more difficult to control until learned). Switching back and forth makes for REAL fast improvement in both processes.

    Knowing how to OA weld can be a real life saver. A ventilation fan was installed in the shop a few days ago. Once the duct work was in place, the fan had to be mounted. Unfortunately, the mount holes were under the motor plate, so no way to drill them. Easy enough.... weld on angle brackets. Great... go get the MIG. No extension cord long enough to reach to the other side of the shop. Uh, oh, leads too short to get on the roof. TIG won't reach, also too short. No long stick welding leads either (that's antiquated now, too). 50ft OA hose, throw the torch up, zip it up and back down in 5 mins. Old school saves the day.

    Tractor down out in the field?... no cord needed. Gotta stick a steel bracket on piece of cast iron? braze it. Aluminum welding without MIG or TIG, and without buying a few hundred bucks worth of additional gasses, tungstens, spool gun, etc... $2 can of flux. Hole in your old truck radiator? solder it up in seconds.

    OA welding, with its added heat can be a good thing in many cases. As the heat is more widespread, it reduces internal stresses on 4130 and 4140 weldments. Same for cast iron welding and brazing.

    Just like the old shaper in my shop or a distributor wrench, not something you use every day, but another bit in the bag of tricks that lets you do the seemingly impossible.

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    I've got quite a few welding texts. One of the best is from the John Deere Company's "Fundamentals of Service" line of books, titled simply "Welding"

    Their publication number is FOS5208NC. About 300 pages, including appendices. Covers all the common methods and some metallurgy and design.

    It was hard to find, mine is secondhand, from Powell's in Oregon.

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    I have a whole shelf full of welding books, but one of the best, shortest, easiest to understand, and most used, is "Welders Handbook" By Richard Finch, HP books.
    Cheap new, even cheaper used from ABEbooks.com or Amazon, it covers all types of welding, and is a great place to start.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=EOi...um=1&ct=result

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    Quote Originally Posted by mulesandheelers View Post
    This Manual has impressed me more than any of the others that I've read to date.
    Sure did a lot more book reading before we got online.

    Fabricators' and Erectors'
    Guide to Welded Steel
    Construction

    https://ssl.lincolnelectric.com/linc...rodnum=FEGuide
    I bought this book based on this posting. Frankly, I found it to be a complete waste of money. The book
    is very text-heavy, and refers constantly to sections of the AWS welding code, annoyingly not quoted.
    There is zero content as to how to weld, or how to fit, or even how to design weldments.

    On a scale of 1 to 5 I'd give this one a big fat zero.

    Grant Erwin
    Kirkland, Washington

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    I have a whole shelf full of welding books, but one of the best, shortest, easiest to understand, and most used, is "Welders Handbook" By Richard Finch, HP books.
    Cheap new, even cheaper used from ABEbooks.com or Amazon, it covers all types of welding, and is a great place to start.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=EOi...um=1&ct=result
    I am amazed, Ries. I checked that one out of the library and found it shallow, insubstantial, and also with too many errors. The guy claims he uses his O/A torch for welding ten times as much as any other way. Of course, his
    focus is almost entirely on welding up aircraft frames, maybe that's why.

    On a scale of 1 to 5 I'd give that one a 2.

    I still strongly suggest "Welding Principles and Applications" by Jeffus. That book is completely on how to weld. It will tell you how to weld in any position with nearly any technology and is full of pictures to make sure you get it.

    Lots of guys recommend "Modern Welding" but this is much much better than that one.

    Grant

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    Default That post describes EXACTLY why I have my torches!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike C. View Post
    MetaRinka, our manual lathes, milling machines and shapers are also obsolete in today's commercial world, but they certainly do the job for me.

    OA is absolutely the most versatile welding apparatus for the home shop and is also the cheapest. It can do things no other welding machine can, like heating and cutting, as well as brazing and soldering. You can be totally set up for under $500. That's a down payment on anything else except a buzz box or puny 110 wire welder.

    I find TIG and OA compliment each other in developing skill. The TIG puddle is much clearer to see, the OA is more controllable (and can be more difficult to control until learned). Switching back and forth makes for REAL fast improvement in both processes.

    Knowing how to OA weld can be a real life saver. A ventilation fan was installed in the shop a few days ago. Once the duct work was in place, the fan had to be mounted. Unfortunately, the mount holes were under the motor plate, so no way to drill them. Easy enough.... weld on angle brackets. Great... go get the MIG. No extension cord long enough to reach to the other side of the shop. Uh, oh, leads too short to get on the roof. TIG won't reach, also too short. No long stick welding leads either (that's antiquated now, too). 50ft OA hose, throw the torch up, zip it up and back down in 5 mins. Old school saves the day.

    Tractor down out in the field?... no cord needed. Gotta stick a steel bracket on piece of cast iron? braze it. Aluminum welding without MIG or TIG, and without buying a few hundred bucks worth of additional gasses, tungstens, spool gun, etc... $2 can of flux. Hole in your old truck radiator? solder it up in seconds.

    OA welding, with its added heat can be a good thing in many cases. As the heat is more widespread, it reduces internal stresses on 4130 and 4140 weldments. Same for cast iron welding and brazing.

    Just like the old shaper in my shop or a distributor wrench, not something you use every day, but another bit in the bag of tricks that lets you do the seemingly impossible.

    I have a set of torches with a few welding tips, and I use the a LOT! I dunno how often you guys find yourselves filling the bottles, but I fill them about every 3-4 months. That's IMPRESSIVE for me. It's starting to get expensive though. I have my gas welding stuff on a modified 2 wheel dolly. MOST of the time, I use it for soldering/brazing, or heating a stuck bolt. The other times I use it for cutting, and RARELY welding. I usually prefer to weld using other devices, but it does come in handy.

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    Grits,

    I am a big fan of the publications from miller electric, and also of their machines:

    http://millerwelds.com/education/tools/#training

    you can buy their instructor or student package for $35 or $25 respectively. I found their mig book to be the easiest to understand of any I have ever read. Even though from experience I knew how to make a lot of it work, there were nuances and details that were clearly and effectively laid out so that I got noticeably better after reading the book.

    the package includes info on tig/mig/stick

    -jon

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    For what it's worth, here's a 10 page thread on books:

    http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...ad.php?t=30221

    My son used Welding Principles and Applications (6th edition - Larry Jeffus) as a text for his recent classes. Quite detailed and around 800 pages. $100. plus

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    There used to be a little pocket-sized book called The Oxy-Acetylene Weldor's Handbook (note the "o" in "weldor) put out originally, I think, by Linde, and later sold by Sears. I don't think it's in print any more, but it's a very useful little book if you can find a copy. I seem to have misplaced mine, but it had a lot of good basic info.


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