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  1. #1
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    Default Good metal plate shear

    Does anyone have any ideas of a good shear to get when buying one or know of a good one for sale. I need one but am having a hard time finding one that fits my needs. I have an excelsior and it shears 11 gauge by 8' but it isn't working out to good. I would like another mechanical that would do 3/16 or 1/4 x 12' but an 8' would work too. Please let me know what you think and the older the better.

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    Theres some good ones out there, try to find one that you can get parts for still, prior the buying it.
    You should plan on spending approximately $ 13,000.00 - $ 20,000.00 for a decent used one around 1/4" x 10', I bought a 1/4" x 10' accurshear for around
    $ 15,000.00 plus another $ 2,000.00 for rigging.

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    The Accushear I used was reliable, though the in/out backgauge counter wasn't accurate.
    Made a gratifying Kaaa-Chunk! when it cut.

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    ya so does mine., I need to adjust my back gauge, its running a 1/16" off in 10'

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    This is the advise I got when looking for a Cincinnati mechanical shear.

    1) make sure there are no letters in the serial number. Letters means the machine was make, most likely, in the Europe and Cincinnati did not get the plans back for those machines and there are some unique parts on those machines that would not be available except to custom make.

    2) get a machine that has a foot pedal to cycle the machine versus the long trundle bar that does across the bottom of the machine.

    3) The hold downs should look like these:
    http://static.auctionservices.com/im...96/3_large.JPG

    With those three things, you probably have an 1980's or newer machine. It will be either a 2CC10 or a 1810G model shear. That is the same set of plans that Cincinnati uses to make their $80K mechanical shears today.

    Mine is a 10' x .25" mechanical and I love it. If you go thicker capacity, you have to dig up the concrete as some of the machine sits below grade for Cincinnati shear that are 3/8" and above.

    I made a template out of laser cut .125" metal to locate the holes for anchoring the machine. The concrete was much less that ideal. In a few years, when I build my own machine, I will pour my own pad.

    20150228_163532.jpg Photo by Jimmy-pop | Photobucket

    20150228_152122.jpg Photo by Jimmy-pop | Photobucket

    20150228_163539.jpg Photo by Jimmy-pop | Photobucket

    https://goo.gl/photos/126ZyBki66cEBegr6

    For mechanical shears, I'd stick with Cincinnati, Wysong or Niagara.

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    I was wondering what everyone's thoughts are on a Pearson shear. A guy in the state has a Pearson shear and it will shear 1" x 12' but it's a beast. This thing weighs 60000 and I really don't want to fool with the foundation, moving it and the power requirements (75 hp). He will load it for me and I would have to have it moved of course. I really don't know if I need this much shear or not. It is adjustable to shear down to 1/16" and it would be all the shear I would ever need. Any thoughts on a Pearson shear, are they still supported.

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    Quote Originally Posted by todd goff View Post
    I was wondering what everyone's thoughts are on a Pearson shear. A guy in the state has a Pearson shear and it will shear 1" x 12' but it's a beast. This thing weighs 60000 and I really don't want to fool with the foundation, moving it and the power requirements (75 hp). He will load it for me and I would have to have it moved of course. I really don't know if I need this much shear or not. It is adjustable to shear down to 1/16" and it would be all the shear I would ever need. Any thoughts on a Pearson shear, are they still supported.
    You better check out the rigging and foundation requirements on that one first. That is an oversize load, so it will either have to be broken down or permitted. Either way is more money. If you just use 3 times the machine weight in the foundation that is 60 yards of concrete. Impact loads are typically more. But 60 yards at $300/yard placed and finished is $18,000 alone.

    Free could well be to much to pay unless you need it and already have the overhead crane installed.

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    Kind of what I was thinking too; a little bit much.

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    That is WAAY too much shear. something like this is probably 480v or more and probably not going to run off a squril cage phase converter. Probably going to need 48" of reinforced concrete and there is probably only one or two riggers that can move a 60k# machine and that will be major cash.

    shipping my 17,000 shear from Ohio to Az was only about $1700. Riging was $700 (crane and versalift) minor concrete work, $300, minor 3phase electric $300. Rebuild a Ross air valve $300. Dedicated air line from compressor, dedicated dryer, new pressure regulator, water separator, oiler $500.

    The squaring arm is dead nuts perfect over 10'. All my work is metric and it is within +- 1 mm diagonally over 10 feet. Love this machine. I can imagine how beautiful a brand new mechanical shear must be to see. If I were to ever order one, I'd have to leave it raw steel.

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    I use this search engine to search craigslist nationally.
    SearchTempest: Search all of Craigslist nationwide & more

    This is how I found my shear. Retired original owner selling off his equipment. Ideal situation. $15k

    Also, use search on this website:
    Bidspotter.com | Industrial, Commercial, Plant and Machinery auctions

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    Do not bother with ebay. you'll notice the magic number of $29,000 or $30,000 on everything, press brake or shears. Those are all machines bought at auction for $10k and resold by dealers. Stay away from that racket. I could tell you one story that happened to me ... jeez.

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    Thanks for the advice guys. My shear is having problems. I had the motor rebuilt at 450 bucks, the clutch is not engaging properly and it's being a Pima if you get my drift. Long story short, the hub that engages the clutch had been broken before I got it and was brazed none too straight. I have the material on the way and am going to make another one but if it doesn't work, well ........

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    Todd,

    This looks like an awesome machine. This is exactly the same machine as mine except alittle newer based on the serial number. The computerized backgauge is really nice too versus the analog read out mine has. It has the pedal, later model hold downs and no letter in the serial number.
    Cincinnati mdl. 2CC10 ¼

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    It is a nice shear and I'd love something like that but as usual it's on the other side of the world. I was hoping that something would show up in SC, NC, Ga, Va. Or Fl. but who knows.

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    FWIW, don't forget about the 80s electromechanical AMADAs, I asked a tech who was delivering new knives if he knew anything about them breaking down, and he said his boss had bought NOS clutch assemblies 25 years ago, and they are still on the shelf. Never had a problem with mine. Beautiful/simple machine.

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    I saw this one on the Milwaukee Craigslist but says it's located in Green Bay. Was posted 2 days ago from what it says.

    Looks really nice in pictures.


    Cincinnati 1010 Power Squaring Shear

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    What are everyone's thoughts on a Niagara sl 12? I'm looking at one and am thinking of getting it put in motion. It will shear 3/16 x 144" but was also wondering if the same shear would shear 1/4" x 96" without hurting anything.

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    A place I worked in 1979-81 had a 10 10 Niagara, that thing was a HOSS! It would cut 10' wide 10 ga steel as fast as you could feed it in. No twist in a 1/2" wide 10' drop. Awesome machine! I would not shear over what it is rated, quick way to muck up a nice machine.

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    Well, my plans for the shear got axed. Yesterday, I told everyone that I was looking at a sl 12 and told my wife about it and she said talk to the bank and see what they can do. Anyhow...... long story short, something changed between yesterday morning and last night. She had a good point that I need to start making some money before I spend more money . In her defense she is right; I'm trying to get this shop going but really getting frustrated. I've got a lot of old equipment that needs repairs sad to say. I am wondering though what would be the chances of getting my old dinosaur shear fixed? I wonder if machinery solutions here near me could do that or if I could retrofit this machine. The problem lies in the hub that slides on the shaft to engage the blades. It's been brazed up so much and out of alignment when it was brazed so bad that it won't slide freely from being out. I'll try and post some pics later on so everyone can see what I'm talking about. Frustrating, very, very frustrating to say the least!

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    You kinda told on yourself. Long story short, if you didn't have the old clutter in your shop and if the tools you did have were operational and able to make money, (even if it not alot of money) it sounds like she would be supportive of updating a broken machine. But to her, this is not updating a broken machine. As a woman and wife, she sees your old machines as expensive waste and clutter that knows no end.

    You could do yourself alot of good by going through your entire shop and purging EVERYTHING that is just clutter. Top to bottom cleaning, even if it's painful. Old, big heavy machines included. Lots of runs to the scrap yard, even with the low prices. Organize shelving, hang a couple lights, sweep the floor and look as if you take this serious.

    It's more about making a clean start and get you focused on starting a shop. A break from your days as a hobbies and man cave decor. It will demonstrate seriousness and commitment to your wife that you are not just adding more sh!t to your boneyard.


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