How to/ Best way ... Solid rivets into alum doors
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  1. #1
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    Default How to/ Best way ... Solid rivets into alum doors

    So I have been working on a project that builds aluminum carts. There is a lot to them and a lot if carts to build. Currently we build it from 100% aluminum, hinges and all. These are for industrial food companies.

    What I currently do is weld 2) 2 1/2 OAW alum hinge x 24" long to a 1 1/4" sq tube post and 1/8" alum door, because I am copying what they currently have. The problem with this design has always been the alum hinge itself. It wears out fast.

    I want to install a stainless hinge, with the idea of solid riveting the hinge to the door using counter sink rivets from the door side to keep sanitary, and to mechanically attach it to the 1 1/4" tube.

    I have never done solid rivets before and after reading a lot of them on here, I am looking for advise on how to keep the rivets to a reasonable price. As in can I use my ironworker to smash the rivet to set it? Should I use alum or ss rivets? If I use ss rivets, I need a hell of a tool to set them. Alum I could be fast at.

    The idea is to put 4 rivets per leaf (24") on the door side, these things get beat heavily at times.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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    Used Machinery & Industrial Equipment | HGR Industrial Surplus

    I like this one, you could weld up whatever throat you need:
    Used Milfo Riveter | HGR Industrial Surplus

    Bowl at back holds rivets, each ram cycle gives it a spin, and they orient and come down a track, setting ready to go at the ram.

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    How do you determine what size rivets it can handle?

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bondo View Post
    How do you determine what size rivets it can handle?
    Call them and ask? Website is another option...Start there, need it for phone # anyway.

    Permanently fastening small or semi-tubular rivets | Orbitform
    These guys might be worth a call also:
    Special Machines/Services | Production Components
    Last edited by Rob F.; 03-11-2020 at 09:01 PM. Reason: Add links

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    I've used a hydraulic rivet/insert/stud machine very much like this video:

    I noticed some great benefits after using it for installing studs in a panel like the video. After that one job i consider such a machine absolutely required if there's production pressing going on.

    Mine has a foot pedal that brings the ram down, makes contact applying moderate pressure and a second tap on the pedal goes to full pressure and sends the ram back up. That's exactly what is needed to have consistent results and a single foot is all you can spare.
    You can make adjustments to the pressure and easily dial in the point where the insert is flush but not leaving a mark on the sheet.

    About material, you may need to use aluminum rivets, stainless in aluminum may be a corrosion problem, especially in in the food service environment.

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    the shop i work at currently rivets end of pins for chain applications, including stainless pins.
    The pins are not hard so i would go for stainless rivets over alum ones as they will be stronger.

    here is a couple of links to the machine brands we have, i don't have the model nos with me but they will be different to what you require anyway.


    Orbital Rivet Presses

    Turner Machine Tools

    You could also look into the way they used to do it with steam boilers they are riveted in a different way.

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    Can you go to an upgraded aluminum hinge, maybe with a SS pin? How fast is this wearing out? What is the weakest link? Going to solid rivets and and SS hinge might be nice, but do you get the glory or just the pain? If it’s not your company’s product don’t volunteer a major improvement without some expectation it will pay off for you.
    The quantity and price point is slso a factor, is it thousands of units a year? Big money? Then go for it.

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    that may be a issue above but...somewhere someone should improve a product, who gains ? most likely everyone if its fairly worked out.
    State one unit could be a field testing sample it you don't have a method of testing it by cycle count to prove it out....proving it first would be best if you can.

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    For industrial food I would recommend you determine the cleaners used on these carts. You are using all aluminum for a reason. Also check USDA regulations and get a written reply.


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